Cinecast Episode 202 – Obviously You’re Not a Golfer

 

It is a cornucopia, a smörgåsbord, a veritable potpourri of cinema, as the Cinecast regulars get together with nothing on the agenda other than to talk about what they have watched, in the cinema, on the DVD and streamed from the internet or (in an exciting technology development, from the Computer Hard Drive.) Andrew continues to dig into the Foreign Language Nominees with Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Biutiful. Kurt comes at Oscar a different way with the new documentary on the man with the midas touch when it comes to little gold men, Harvey Weinstein. And Gamble talks best animated film of 2011 with a preview of the flat out awesome Gore Verbinski/Nickelodeon/Industrial-Light-And-Magic Johnny Depp western, Rango. From there, we go from the occult, to Penelope Cruz DTV failures, to two vastly different takes time travel from the 1980s to Chinese shopping malls. Then it is onto Romans wandering about Scotland, Aussie crime dynasties and suburban teenage prostitution rings! It is all a part of your complete breakfast.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_202.mp3

ALTERNATIVE (no music track):
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_202-alt.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…
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Folman Waltzes into Futurological Congress

The Futurological Congress Book CoverStanisław Lem is a master. The Polish writer of science fiction saw his works translated into 41 languages but for film fans, he’s perhaps best known as the author of “Solaris”, a novel which has not once but twice been adapted to film. Now it appears like another of Lem’s works will see life on the big screen.

Ari Folman, the director of the devastating Waltz with Bashir (our review), has signed on to adapt Lem’s book “The Futurological Congress”, a darkly humerus story detailing the exploits of Ijon Tichy as, according to Wikipedia, “he visits the Eighth World Futurological Congress at the Costa Rica Hilton. The book is Lem’s take on the common sci-fi trope of an apparently Utopian future that turns out to be an illusion”.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Folman plans on mixing live-action with “dreamlike animation” to tell Lem’s story. I have a feeling we may have another A Scanner Darkly on our hands and frankly, that’s not a bad thing. I’m looking forward to seeing a film from Folman that I can stand to sit through more than once and this sounds like it could be it.

Now, to track down that novel…