Posts Tagged ‘Twin Peaks’

  • Lynch Shooting Twin Peaks Conclusion/Promo/Something.

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    The casting call for this is hilariously politically incorrect, as is usual for this sort of thing (see below), but are you ready for a tiny taste of Peaks after 25 years?


    “TWIN PEAKS PROMO. Directed by David Lynch. Shoots in Los Angeles on Tuesday, January 7, 2014. Prob a 6 hour or less day. Rate is 150/8. You must live in LA to submit. I don’t think SAG has jurisdiction on this, so SAG and NON can submit. I have called SAG to double check this and I am awaiting a call back to confirm.
    HOT Caucasian girl – BRUNETTE OR REDHEADS ONLY to play waitress. Age 18-27. MUST have an amazing body. Busty, very period looking face. Please submit two current color photos (one body shot, one face shot), your sizes, union status and contact info to: SandeAlessiCasting@gmail.com.”

    Hat-tip: Bustle.com

  • TIFF Review: Horns

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    “A“re you Horny?” asks Juno Temple of Daniel Radcliffe in one of the more tranquil moments in this goofy yet sincere adaptation of Joe Hill’s by all accounts quite good novel, Horns. Their two lovers, Iggy and Merrin lay like Yin and Yang across a spread blanket in the leafy Washington State forest, their own little eden. They kiss while the camera looks on from heaven only to have it then quickly drill down into the ground to look up from Hell as we learn that shortly after their playful kiss that Merrin is murdered and Iggy is kind of the chief suspect. David Bowie’s “Heroes” plays on a turntable only before it is physically impeded to produce that ominously SLLLOOOOWW deep sound that only vinyl can produce. The town mourns the loss of Merrin, its Laura Palmer, the perfect girl struck down in her youth. This kind of crime brings out the worst kind of weirdness in small towns. It is impossible to miss the Twin Peaks-y vibe going on here, hell, Heather Graham is even serving coffee and pie at the local diner. Iggy cannot convince anyone of his innocence, not his parents, not his future father in law and least of all the salacious local news media, but all of this become a heck of a lot harder when he literally starts to sprout horns from his head. Is he becoming the devil the town is all projecting upon him with their accusatory stares?

    I am all for jarring tonal shifts in films, the Koreans do this kind of thing masterfully, but the throw-back towards 80s high concept fantasy and 21st century addiction on CGI and bloated run times go together like oil-and-water. In spite of decent performances from the leads, there is something unflatteringly off about the storytelling and plethora of secondary characters. Director Alexandre Aja the storyteller seems to have peaked with Haute Tension a decade ago when he kicked off the wave New French Horror, his American work is glossier, but more muddled. While Horns is a step up from Mirrors or Piranha 3D, it is still muddled. He can never seem to focus on what is important – that is the love story between Iggy and Merrin. Cutting away for lengthy flashbacks, revenge story theatrics and procedural sleuthing work well in long form TV, but every element feels sloppy, rushed, and undeveloped. The film has a heyday with Iggy’s horns giving him the a kind of super-power to bring out the worst kind of pettiness in people where tone is over-the-top silly, more Joe Dante than Dante Alighieri. A woman comically gorges on donunts inhibitions and propriety thrown out the window, a doctor drops all levels of professionalism to screw his nurse, and the media have a literal scrum over a scoop. When this power starts to have his family and friends confess and misbehave, it becomes almost unbearably tragic. Separate scenes with Iggy’s mom and dad, played by Kathleen Quinlan and James Remar, see both parents reject their son in the most raw manner. Merrin’s father, a tiny but pivotal part handled by the always reliable David Morse, plays out with the kind of dark poignancy (“She was my favourite thing about you.”) of a Stephen King novel – this is perhaps no surprise considering Joe Hill is the Horror Master’s son.

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  • Cinecast Episode 300 – Lets Talk Some Shit!

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    For our MEGA-SUPER-DUPER-EXTRAVAGANZA episode 300, we do what we always do, talk casually about movies. Seriously folks, despite our inability to properly plan for these big milestone episodes, we appreciate our listening audience mightily, and their ongoing interaction on the site and by email and other means. To kick off the show, Andrew reads some listener mail which gets us right down into the minutiae of Park Chan-Wook’s Stoker (again.) This is a film we love to talk about! Kurt skims across the surface of three profound science fiction epics, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Solaris and Sunshine before getting mired in the bizarre world of Twin Peaks and Fire Walk with Me. We talk the legacy of James Cameron’s Titanic in all its goofy glory, as well as boats and tigers novel adaptations with Life of Pi. And we leave with a bang in the form of homo-erotic riff on Sergio Leone by way of Bill Murray’s Quick Change – the 1967 Japanese-noir-gangster-western A Colt Is My Passport.

    As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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    Here is the Music Player. You need to installl flash player to show this cool thing!


    DOWNLOAD mp3 | 81 MB
    if player is not working, try alternate player at bottom of this post

     
     
    Full show notes are under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Cinecast Episode 299 – Techincally, Literally and Actually

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    We don’t have much to get into today. Mostly were just shaking in our boots about the expectations for Episode 300. So far we’ve got nothing but we’ll figure out what to do for something at least a little bit different. For today, it’s all Park Chan-Wook and trying to pronounce Mia Wasikowska. Love doesn’t quite do it justice. Be prepared for SPOILERS though. We look forward to the next couple of episodes and Kurt gives brief impressions of his thoughts on Dreamworks’ The Croods, which we’ll talk a little bit more about later this week.

    As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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    Here is the Music Player. You need to installl flash player to show this cool thing!


    DOWNLOAD mp3 | 49 MB
    if player is not working, try alternate player at bottom of this post

     

     
     
    Full show notes and VIDEO version are under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Review: Stoker

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    When Pauline Kael wrote off The Coen Brothers’ 1984 debut, Blood Simple, she had this to say: “Reviewers who hail the film as a great début and rank the Coens with Welles, Spielberg, Hitchcock, and Sergio Leone may be transported by seeing so many tricks and flourishes from sources they’re familiar with. But the reason the camera whoop-de-do is so noticeable is that there’s nothing else going on.”

    Nearly 30 years later, style as substance has pretty much won the day as much as extruded franchised dinguses (and at the risk of boiling American Cinema down to two camps, I certainly prefer the former to the latter endless string of blockbuster product.) The South Koreans have been elevating arch style and glossy violence since the start of this young century. After dominating Japanese culture for a number years, and getting every single person on the goddamn planet to watch Psy’s Gangnam Style video on YouTube, it was only a matter of time before Busan’s top directors started coming to America to make Hollywood movies with caucasian A-listers. Earlier this year, it was Kim Ji Woon with The Last Stand, and later this year it will be Bong Joon Ho with Snow Piercer, but right here, right now, it is Park Chan-Wook with Stoker. Put aside any concerns that the Korean auteur’s particular style of filmmaking would be in any way dulled, diluted or even perverted by his entrance into Hollywood system. Putting his more literal vampire film, Thirst, aside for a moment, Stoker feels like the logical cultural transition from his cult ‘Vengeance’ Trilogy, a set of films that seemed to get more classy -and classical- as they went along. Here, his collaboration with screenwriter Wentworth Miller, handsomely merges Shadow of a Doubt and Let The Right One In together inside the tasteful glass house of Joseph Losey’s The Servant. Stoker is a hermetically sealed coming of age film with a taste for blood and emotional straight jackets. One of many exquisite images in the film is of candles on a birthday cake so casually extinguished whereupon a crystal casing is put over top of the lit flames, effectively and cutting off the oxygen, but allowing the smoke to linger in suspension. It is a telling enough portrait of the family dynamic to follow.

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  • Bookmarks for April 6-8th

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    • 20th Anniversary of the Death of Laura Palmer – How Twin Peaks Changed TV
      “”Twenty years after the influential cult television show began, David Lynch’s sci-fi, absurdist murder-mystery soap opera continues to scare and befuddle legions of viewers. Without it, there would be no ‘Lost’, ‘The X-Files’ or any of the countless serials habitually labeled “quirky” and/or “weird” since the show’s debut on April 8, 1990.”
    • Some Love for Tina Fey: No More Catty Best Friends
      “She makes me laugh, unexpectedly, sheepishly, loudly, thoroughly and consistently. She is, without question, one of the ten best comedians working today. She’s John Belushi doing Joe Cocker. She’s Richard Pryor killing on the mic. She’s Norm MacDonald cracking jokes about O.J. Simpson, Vince Vaughn standing on a diner table and Johnny Carson direct addressing his audience as K-Mart shoppers. I believe in Tina Fey because she makes me laugh, and that’s why, for the first time in my life, I’m going to see a comedy entirely because of its female star.”
    • Slumming it in the movies
      “The history of American indie film happens to be dominated by lowlifes and inarticulates. This is what happens when the godfathers of independent film are John Cassavetes and Melvin van Peebles, both attracted to working-class sparks. Complaining about intelligent guys wasting their talents on “low-lifes” smacks of snobbery, but it also ignores the fact that American indie film is and always has been primarily oriented towards the marginalized, who aren’t going to make movies about themselves, and certainly aren’t about to be the stars of mainstream films.”
    • My Friend Francis, The Commentator (DVD Commentary as Art?)
      “”What you really need—yeah, there it is—what you really need is a filmmaker commentary situation. Straight art, straight cinema—it’s gonna hit you between the eyes too hard. You need a buffer, someone talking, someone intelligent to talk you through the night and the images. And damn if Francis Ford Coppola is not the man to do it. He is. Yeah. In fact I believe Francis Ford Coppola could single-handedly bring anyone through heartache with his combination of DVD commentaries, wine, and pasta sauces. But let’s focus on the DVD commentaries.”
    • Dennis Hopper Blues: The Mix Tape
      “Doctors are more than likely telling Dennis Hopper to take it easy while he battles prostate cancer. It’s not easy to rest comfortably when he’s in court in a divorce battle and now ordered to pay his estranged wife $12,000 a month. Dennis Hopper, fighting until the bitter end. Let’s create a set of music around his situation, his films, etc.”
    • Chuck Norris is Dead. Werner Herzog Killed Him.
      “The San Francisco Guardian recently reported that the hottest new Twitter trend is the “Werner Herzog vs. Chuck Norris” tag, which modifies a Chuck Norris fact to showcase how film director Werner Herzog is infinitely more awesome. A choice example: “Chuck Norris counted from 0 to infinity. Werner Herzog counted backwards from infinity to 0.”

     

    You can now take a look at RowThree’s bookmarks at any time of your choosing simply by clicking the “delicious” button in the upper right of the page. It looks remarkably similar to this:

  • Bookmarks for November 23-30th

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    What we’ve been reading over the past week or so.

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    • A Top 10: Lengthy Tracking Shots
      From Godard to Scorsese. Showy Shots abound. There are plenty more to add (feel free to suggest in the comment, I am surprised they left out the big D.W. Griffith shot in Intolerance. Or for that matter, The Protector, Brazil, Serenity, Boogie Nights, Satantango, etc. etc. But then again, it is only a top 10.
    • Playboy does James Cameron (no photos!)
      “Avatar is made very consciously for movie fans. If critics like it, fine. I can’t say I won’t read the reviews, because I may not be able to resist. I spent a couple of decades in the capricious world of being judged by those not knowledgeable about the depth and history of film and with whom I would not want to have a conversation—with a few notable exceptions. Why would I want to be judged by them? For me, this past decade has been about retreating to the great fundamentals, things that aren’t passing fads or subject to the whims of some idiot critic. You can’t write a review of the laws of thermodynamics.”
    • SPIEGEL Interview with Umberto Eco on the vertigo of making lists
      “I was fascinated with Stendhal at 13 and with Thomas Mann at 15 and, at 16, I loved Chopin. Then I spent my life getting to know the rest. Right now, Chopin is at the very top once again. If you interact with things in your life, everything is constantly changing. And if nothing changes, you’re an idiot.”
    • ‘Nine’ Leads Indie Heavy Golden Satellite Nods
      While the awards – handed out by International Press Academy – are generally disregarded as a serious Oscar precursor due to their often inexplainable decisions, this year’s batch is definitely full of worthy nominees, particularly from the specialty sector.
    • More Mainstream Press for THE ROOM.
      “Tommy Wiseau’s “The Room” is a train wreck of almost incomprehensible proportions: Whole scenes are out of focus, while others are repeated in their entirety; characters appear without introduction, while others vanish without explanation; and the unfortunate cast engages in behavior that few would consider typical. All of which, of course, makes the painfully overwrought relationship drama one of the greatest comedies ever to be created entirely by accident.”
    • The Road Takes Desolate Journey From Page to Screen
      To deliver “The Road’s” worn and weathered ambience, Hillcoat avoided as much as possible the over-the-top digital approach employed by director Roland Emmerich for his post-apocalyptic spectacle, “2012.” Hillcoat shot “The Road” at 51 real-world locations to give the R-rated film, which opens Wednesday, an extra dose of authenticity.
    • 100+ Cliche Dialogue Lines
      ‘The Definitive List of Cliched Dialogue’ or just another day at the office for those ink stained grinders writing Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mark Dacacos or Steven Segal flicks.
    • Critical Shift: New Moon vs. Gone With The Wind
      Peter Howell considers what has changed in the critical landscape in how lurid melodrama and hammy acting was received in 1939 vs. 2009.
    • Tres Chic Twin Peaks Photo Gallery
      Quite an awesome (yet creepy) set of on-set photos taken during the taping of Twin Peaks by Richard Beymar.
    • The 99 Most Jaw-Dropping Movie Moments
      We love those movie moments that make us feel like we’ve been swiftly punched in the gut. The shocking scenes that give us goosebumps and gasps at the same time. Because we love those shock & awe bits so much, we’ve compiled our 99 favourites, counting down to the all-time greatest jaw-dropping movie moment.
  • Trailer for Aussie Ghost Fake-Doc, Lake Mungo

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    lakemungo_imageTwitch just posted a trailer for this nicely restrained ghost story from down under, Lake Mungo. A bit reminiscent of The Orphanage in all the good ways (and this review confirms my suspicions) with elements of perhaps Twin Peaks and making confident use of the faux documentary style. I am quite looking forward to this one, which was supposed to be released in 2008 on this continent, but now is a part of the 4th annual After Dark Films series “8 Films To Die For” and getting the usual limited release in theaters offered by that series on January 29th, 2010.

    Sixteen-year-old Alice Palmer drowns while swimming in the local dam. When her body is recovered and a verdict of accidental death returned, her grieving family buries her. The family then experiences a series of strange and inexplicable events centered in and around their home. Profoundly unsettled, the Palmers seek the help of psychic and parapsychologist, Ray Kemeny who discovers that Alice led a secret, double life. A series of clues lead the family to Lake Mungo where Alice’s secret past emerges.

    Trailer is Tucked Under the Seat.

    » Read the rest of the entry..