Trailer: Blade Runner 2029 – The ACTION Picture


 

The latest advert for Denis Villeneuve’s sequel to cult classic science-fiction-noir Blade Runner, is made for television. With that in mind, I never expected the tradition and history of this film to result in a generic shoot-em-up action picture, but hey, that is how one gets butts in seats. Of course, the trailer also gives more glimpses of the wonder post-urban world that cinematographer Roger Deakins and producer Ridley Scott magnificently deliver.

The internet is ‘freaking out’ and telling people not to watch this, as they embed it in the very-same ‘warning article.’ I am less caring about Spoilers, and more curious as to if this film will indeed be an action picture, and not an atmospheric, thoughtful science fiction film. Knowing Villeneuve (who recently made the nearly-gun-and-explosion-free Arrival, which brimmed with thoughtful sci-fi concepts and sophisticated film grammar, I am expecting the latter in spite of this bit of marketing.

 

Second Trailer: Blade Runner 2


 

If you want action and chases and a lot more Jared Leto, well then, this recent trailer for the Blade Runner sequel is probably tailored to your liking. Sure it sells it like a more conventional action-blockbuster, which I am confident it will not be, but there is your marketing department for you.

Also getting a healthy amount of trailer time are Robin Wright and David Bautista, but the real star here is the production design by Dennis Gassner and the cinematography by Roger Deakins.

Trailer: Blade Runner 2


 

The full trailer for Denis Villeneuve’s epic-scaled Blade Runner sequel has arrived, and it is glorious. In terms of future hologram bespackled cities, Ghost in the Shell, in hindsight was simply an amuse-bouche to the feast that Roger Deakins has prepared for us. Cold grey-blues, Fury-Road oranges, infinite whites, and twinkling Atari lights.
Oh My.

In terms of new cast members Robin Wright and Jared Leto introduced here, as does Ana de Armas (blink at the right point, and you will miss Dave Bautista).

I hope the story is as beautiful as everything on display here. I expect nothing short than greatness, even as I believe that movie will explicitly, in no uncertain terms, finally INSIST that Deckard is a replicant, and likely all of the police force.

Blown away here at the moment, though. Enjoy.

Friday One Sheet: Blade Runner 2049

Unfortunately it looks like the rage that was minimalism isn’t quite dead yet. I say unfortunately because while minimalism has its time and place, I tend to prefer creativity and flashiness and color – when it’s done well. Minimalism tends to stifle creativity and encourages laziness. Case in point here. Not these aren’t handsome looking posters; on the contrary they are quite eye-catching and definitely set a mood. But at the same time, they’re kind of boring.

And if you ask me, they look like Mad Max: Fury Road and a Fast and Furious movie respectively. Which I’m hoping, Bladde Runner 2049 is nothing like; despite the fact that I do like those movies, I’m hoping Blade Runner: 2049 is a bit closer to something like Looper in tone; or at least in pacing.

At any rate, I remain cautiously optimistic about this film. One moment I’m excited, the next I’m apprehensive. This new poster set does really nothing to swing the proverbial pendulum either way for me. So here’s to more hoping and waiting.

Review: Song To Song

SongToSong

And so the prostitute says, “Create the Illusion, but don’t believe it.”

I am not sure if that is Terrence Malick’s thesis with Song To Song, an elliptical fairy tale of despondency, but the film does feature Val Kilmer wielding a chainsaw on stage at the SXSW music festival, so there is that.

It also embeds clips from Eric Von Stroheim’s Greed, offers heartbreaking relationship advice from punk rock goddess Patti Smith, cheerfully cuts off Iggy Pop in mid-sentence and makes a little time for Natalie Portman to wait tables and attend church services kitted out in Erin Brockovich inspired push-up bras.

Song to Song is Malick’s fifth film in six years, not including his forthcoming Europe-set WWII epic, to be released later in 2017. Apparently, The film has been in production in one way or another for seven years; long enough to recast Christian Bale (or re-purpose his footage into Knight of Cups) and lose Arcade Fire completely in the editing room. This means that the overall process overlaps all the way back with Tree of Life, the touchstone for his current mode of cinema.

The ongoing price to pay for scrapping conventional storytelling (and, you know, actual scripts) has yielded his work some superb benefits … for those keen to tune into his wavelength. Of course, this is not for everyone, and do not be surprised when many film-goers drawn in by the marquee actors and musician cameos flee the experience in frustration. Like it or not, Malick has, for some time now, been in the business of capturing elusive, immersive, Steadicam dreams of time and place that he subtly bends into narrative in the editing room.

Here he films in the in-between spaces of Texas, be it backstage casual at South By Southwest, the concrete and glass boxes of the wealthy, or windswept desert pools in the wilderness. You would not recognize this as the same Austin in the front half of Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof or the sprawling walkabouts of so many a Richard Linkater joint. And though the film features an impressively programmed and multifarious playlist, the soundtrack is less the music, and more the palpable ennui of gorgeous white young things trying to find themselves in a confusing world of indulgence.

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Trailer: Terrence Malick’s Song To Song

After the magnificent Knight of Cups and the egregious Voyage of Time: Life’s Journey in 2016, Terrence Malick is back (so soon) with a rock and roll sour romance (Mike Nichol’s Closer with guitars and keyboards?) featuring some of the best A-list actors working today: Michael Fassbender, Ryan Gosling, Rooney Mara and Natalie Portman. Not featured in the trailer are the host of other actors, Cate Blanchette, Clifton Collins Jr., Christian Bale, Benicio Del Toro, Holly Hunter, Angela Bettis, Val Kilmer, and Halley Bennett. Nor do you see the various musicians: Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Johnny Lydon or Arcade Fire.

Shot with his signature style (lots of voice over, wide angle lenses, and pretty much zero emphasis on narrative) with his usual cinematographer, Emmanual Lubezki, if you wanted to know what an indie-rock tale would look like from the elegiac master of cinema, well, the trailer is tucked below.

Song to Song opens on March 17th.

Cinecast Episode 465 – Ny Ny York

Award season is upon us and from here on out we’ll be diving into a lot of so-called “Oscar Contenders.” Perhaps no other film in 2016 is as universally lauded as Damien Chazelle’s La La Land starring Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling. Andrew and Kurt are finally able to put a discussion to this picture after Kurt had seen it months ago at The TIFF. Is it quite the spectacle everyone claims? From there, we quickly pound through a Watch List that includes Mozart in the Jungle, some b-level (c-level?) sci-fi horror pictures, Wes Anderson at his “most mature” and venture back to the Satruday morning cartoon cereals. This episode is kept a little tighter this week. If you want a little more from the guys, be sure to check out The Super Ticket with the Mamo Matts in which we talk a little movie called Star Wars Rogue One.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

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Teaser: Blade Runner 2049

Eschewing the cyberpunk rain and clutter, the first teaser trailer for Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner sequel is all arid and spacious. It gets the job done however, showing Ryan Gosling as the title character leaving the cluttered metropolis, accompanied by a key line of dialogue from the original film, to a desert wasteland, where he encounters a piano, and an aged Harrison Ford; hopefully not a Replicant.

The first key dialogue, “Things were simpler then” — As if the first film was anything but simple. With Villeneuve, the superb above-the-line team including Ridley Scott, Roger Deakins, Hampton Fancher and Jóhann Jóhannsson and the budget of two major studios (Warners and Sony/Columbia), we have a potential FURY ROAD situation. This is a damn fine thing.

Friday One Sheet: La La Land

There is certainly nothing wrong with simplicity. This minimal poster for upcoming Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling musical, La La Land, still offers plenty of information. The posh clothing indicates a swanky night out, the stage door sign indicated that this is likely the two performing. Not sure what the cool blue tint is indicative of, but the text helpfully offers that the film is from, Damien Chazelle, the director of Whiplash.

The musical premieres in Venice and Toronto in the coming weeks before getting a limited theatrical release in December.

Cinecast Episode 441 – Lust and Aimlessness

nice-guuys-cinecast

Back on track with Shane Black. The boys are able to reconvene this week with not one, but two main theatrical reviews for your spoiler pleasure. We start it off this week with Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling in a good old fashioned buddy-cop, action/comedy The Nice Guys. It really ties the room together.

Next up is Yorgos Lanthimos’ first English language film, The Lobster. This one is a little bit more difficult to parse out. It stars one Colin Farrell and one Rachel Weiss among others; it is a twisted and comedic (deadpan?) look at love, relationships and dating in a world painted like only this particular director can portray. Kurt and Andrew attempt to hash out what it all means. Kurt revisits the glory days of Saturday morning cartoons and Andrew just wishes he had seven bowls of Captain’s Peanut Butter Crunch.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

 
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Trailer: The Nice Guys

Shane Black works his ‘Laugh, Laugh, Bang, Bang’ magic here with the buddy comedy formula. Pairing up Russell Crowe’s hired muscle with Ryan Gosling’s accident-prone private dick. Drop in a period 70’s setting and, comedy gold. I like to The Nice Guys as filing the niche of the populist, low-brow version of Inherent Vice. This is a very good thing.

The earlier red band trailer offered a look at how violent and raunchy the mayhem was going to get, but this new full trailer gets more into the details of the plot (suicide, kidnapping, disco, porn stars, the mafia, human-sized bees, and the kind of noirish Los Angeles we know and love) but really showcases the chemistry of the two leads, and what appears to be one of Black’s top-tier screenplays.

The Nice Guys drops into cinemas on May 20th.