Billy Bob Thornton’s JAYNE MANSFIELD’S CAR Heads to DVD and Blu-ray This December

Anchor Bay Films announced today the Blu-ray and DVD release of Billy Bob Thornton’s Jayne Mansfield’s Car. Currently available On Demand and on iTunes, the film will be in stores on December 10, 2013.

In what critics are calling his best work as writer/director since Sling Blade, Academy Award®-winner Billy Bob Thornton stars along with Oscar winner Robert Duvall, two time Oscar®-nominee John Hurt and Golden Globe®-winner Kevin Bacon, in this story of fathers and sons, wars and peace, and the turbulent time that changed America forever.

It’s 1969 in a small Alabama town, and the death of a quirky clan’s long estranged wife and mother bring together two very different families for the funeral. But do the scars of the past hide differences that will tear them apart or expose truths that could lead to the most unexpected collisions of all?

 

Review: GET LOW

getlow_01

You are pretty much guaranteed quality in a Robert Duvall performance, any Robert Duvall performance, whether it is small cameo support (From The Conversation to The Road) or the lead in an intimate drama or even a Civil War epic. He is, simply put, one of the great actors of all time – one who can do both larger-than-life screen demolishing performances and quiet, subtle acting with his eyes alone. Yet about once every decade he really brings something special to the table; a particularly memorable character, a very intense performance. In the 1960s, his feature film debut, he plays the haunted and pale Boo Radley in To Kill A Mocking Bird; in the 1970s he immortalized his love for the smell of napalm in the morning as a general who like to surf and plays Wagner when going into battle; in the 1980s he plays a quiet, down-on-his-luck country singer who does odd jobs for room and board while trying to put his life back together; and in the 1990s his turn as the bombastic Apostle E.F. might just be the best single performance of that decade. Get Low is with little doubt his performance of this decade, something that embodies all of those characters mentioned above, yet is its own multi-layered beast. The film itself maybe be accessible and easily digestible stuff, I am not sure that the world actually needs a warm and fuzzy inversion of Billy Wilder’s Ace in The Hole, but the Duvall performance is the thing. And it certainly does not hurt that his supporting thespians are Sissy Spacek and Bill Murray.

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GET LOW gets a Trailer (finally!)

getlow_01

One of the pleasant surprises of TIFF last year was Aaron Schneider’s debut film, the western/comedy/character-drama Get Low (Review here). Kind of a kinder, gentler, but still rather surprising take on Billy Wilder’s classic Ace In The Hole, with its media circus and mysterious trickster, but focusing on character rather than ‘portrait of america.’ It offers delightful performances from all of the leads. A classic straight-up sarcastic-comic performance from Bill Murray and a warm, gentle performance from Sissy Spacek are icing on the cake. But the knock-out central performance of Robert Duvall is one of his best.

Not to be missed!

Trailer is tucked under the seat.
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Review: Crazy Heart

Director: Scott Cooper
Novel: Thomas Cobb
Screenplay: Scott Cooper
Producers: T-Bone Burnett, Judy Cairo, Rob Carliner, Scott Cooper, Robert Duvall
Starring: Jeff Bridges, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jack Nation, Colin Farrell, Robert Duvall
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 112 min.

Not having read any other reviews for Crazy Heart at all yet, I’ve got a million dollars that says about 90% of them make reference to either 2008’s The Wrestler or in some way invokes the name of “His Dudeness.” Either of these comparisons are perfectly fair, though not altogether negative; at least not for this reviewer. Some will argue that the novel from which Crazy Heart is adapted, was released over two decade before Aronofsky’s The Wrestler even existed; but nonetheless, cinephiles are going to see an astonishing performance from Jeff Bridges and recognize that they saw this exact same story last year portrayed by Mickey Rourke. Though I don’t necessarily fall on the side of arguing that that is a bad thing, it is a little distracting once in a while with its obviousness.

Bridges is Bad Blake; a broke, traveling musician who roams from town to town playing tiny venues to aging, but adoring fans of his country music. We soon find that Blake is suffering from alcoholism and it’s beginning to effect not only his profession but also his personal life. It’s clear his past is troubled and layers are slowly removed as the film wears on to slowly reveal what those troubles are. Relationships have always seemed to be a problem for Blake, but after meeting a young journalist (Gyllenhaal) during an interview, he finds himself smitten with this single mother and so begins a rocky and likely doomed relationship. Over rocks and bumps, Blake continues to spiral downwards and the proverbial (and literal) scrapes Blake inflicts upon himself begin to get deeper and more severe; eventually inadvertently cutting others, even the ones he claims to love.

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Crazy Heart Poster and Trailer

So maybe a little on the corny, melodramatic side but still… merging too of my favorite things into one (music and film) with a cast I won’t be able to skip and I’m convinced we’re probably looking at something kind of special here; particularly for Jeff Bridges.

Directorial debuts are also something nearly always special as there’s no ingrained sense of “have to do it this way.” New film makers do it the way they know how which often leads to risks and lucky mistakes.

Rounding out the cast is Maggie Gyllenhaal, Robert Duval and Colin Farrell. This looks like Jeff Bridges’ take on The Wrestler. I’m sold.

Bad Blake (Jeff Bridges) is a broken-down, hard-living country music singer who’s had way too many marriages, far too many years on the road and one too many drinks way too many times. And yet, Bad can’t help but reach for salvation with the help of Jean (Maggie Gyllenhaal), a journalist who discovers the real man behind the musician.

 

TIFF 09 Review: Get Low

getlow_01

You are pretty much guaranteed quality in a Robert Duvall performance, any Robert Duvall performance, whether it is small cameo support (From The Conversation to The Road) or the lead in an intimate drama or even a Civil War epic. He is, simply put, one of the great actors of all time – one who can do both larger-than-life screen demolishing performances and quiet, subtle acting with his eyes alone. Yet about once every decade he really brings something special to the table; a particularly memorable character, a very intense performance. In the 1960s, his feature film debut, he plays the haunted and pale Boo Radley in To Kill A Mocking Bird; in the 1970s he immortalized his love for the smell of napalm in the morning as a general who like to surf and plays Wagner when going into battle; in the 1980s he plays a quiet, down-on-his-luck country singer who does odd jobs for room and board while trying to put his life back together; and in the 1990s his turn as the bombastic Apostle E.F. might just be the best single performance of that decade. Get Low is with little doubt his performance of this decade, something that embodies all of those characters mentioned above, yet is its own multi-layered beast. The film itself maybe be accessible and easily digestible stuff, I am not sure that the world actually needs a warm and fuzzy inversion of Billy Wilder’s Ace in The Hole, but the Duvall performance is the thing. And it certainly does not hurt that his supporting thespians are Sissy Spacek and Bill Murray.

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Extended Thoughts (TIFF 09): The Road

John Hillcoat's The Road

When it was announced that Australian director John Hillcoat would be taking up the challenge of bringing the bleak and difficult novel, The Road, to the screen it seemed liked the absolute perfect match of director and material. After all, his gritty and fly-coated outback western The Proposition had that right mix of apocalyptic and tender that is the essence of Cormac McCarthy’s prose (the crisp non-nonsense sentences are as sparsely worded as any book that I have read, yet finds power and poetry in its repetition). And are not many post-apocalypse survival movies similar in tone and execution to the modern anti-western? Make no mistake, this is a handsome, consistent and harrowing adaptation of the work, but it is not quite a filmic masterpiece because I fear the novel as it is, is not translatable from the written page to the screen. There is something about letting the immediacy of each small sentence in the book sink in slowly, whereas Hillcoat and co. have only 2 short hours with with to pain their gray portrait of a world in ruin. It is a faithful adaptation of the book to be sure, many of the “Day After Tomorrow” images in the gawd-awful trailer cut by the Weinstein Company are (thankfully) not in the in the film, and any scars or signs of its length (and likely troubled) production history are not evident on screen. Rest assured that The Road is the quiet and intimate drama, and very likely to be the bleakest multiplex movie of 2009 (should the distributor finally stop shuffling it back in the calender again and again) as it should be; yet, nevertheless between book and screenplay, something of the soul was lost in translation.
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Cinecast Episode 138 – Not too TIFFicult

Episode 138:
Kurt and Andrew finally face to face at the same table. We cover a lot of highlights from the Toronto International Film Festival but specifically the much anticipated John Hillcoat film, The Road and Werner Herzog’s whacky remake of Bad Lieutenant starring Nicolas Cage. Sleep deprived but hopped up on espresso and instant noodles, we forge on through the 4am hour.

Enjoy and thanks for listening!

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show content

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://www.rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_09/episode_138.mp3

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The Road FINALLY Gets a Release Date!

The Road Movie Still

In what has been a long and turbulent road, we’re finally getting firm information on the single film which has been discussed the most since this site’s inception: The Road. The John Hillcoat adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s bleak, post-apocalyptic world was originally scheduled for release late last year, we assumed in time for Oscar, but at the last moment, the film was pulled off of the schedule and, for lack of a better term, shelved indefinitely and considering we’d only seen a few photos of the film, it looked like it might never come out even though it features Viggo Mortensen, Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce and Robert Duvall.

Good news! The wait is nearly over. Though it’s still a few months away, Bloody Disgusting has news that Dimension Films has finally set a release date and unless they change it again (I sure as hell hope not!) we’re going to be seeing Hillcoat’s new film on October 16th.

REJOICE!

Cinecast Episode 95 – Fcuking Amazing!

cinecast_promo.jpg Matt Gamble

Episode 95:
In which Mr. Matt Gamble of Wherethelongtailends.com joins the fray to help discuss Tropic Thunder, some more Woody Allen, a new top ten list and other goodies and tangents.

Click the little Audio Icon until we get our Widget back in order:

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://www.rowthree.com/audio/episode95.mp3

Unwrap the complete Show Notes…
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