Cinecast Episode 275 – Flaming Zemeckis

Continuing with another week centered around an interesting title to talk about, Corey Pierce from CriticalMassCast joins us for a (SPOILER!) filled discussion on structure, themes and mouth-feel of Looper. Corey explains the ‘Rule of Awesome’ when it comes to these types of movies, and whether or not to nitpick. Kurt obsesses about the visual queues in the film and Andrew contemplates Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s adoption of Bruce Willis’ body language. We move on to grading homework, wherein Matt Gamble joins us for colour commentary and general merriment. The Watch List has Corey giving a mini-review of The Perks of Being a Wallflower, while Kurt falls down the Kubrick rabbit hole with visual essays both good and bad. Micro-discussions on The Fountain, Christopher Guest, Electric Cars, The Game, Alan Rickman and Compliance ensue.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 



To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_12/episode_275.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…
Would you like to know more…?

Review: Looper

[SPOILER ALERT – It’s excellent. Seriously, though, if you are adverse any advance hints of plot or character in Looper, consider this review peppered with very mild spoilers that make any sort of considered review even possible in this case.]

Empiricist founding father John Locke proposed a curious scenario with of all things, his socks. It goes something like this. If you had a hole in your sock and had to patch it over, you’d probably call it the same sock, more or less. But if you developed another hole, then another, to the point where all the original material of that sock was replaced, would it still be the same sock? Rian Johnson’s fantastic time travel film asks the question, after 30 years of life (and life lessons) are you still you? Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis are playing Joe, an assassin who kills for the mafia of 2070, even if the present is 2044. Time travel may have been invented somewhere between that span of years, but it was immediately outlawed and then equally immediately co-opted by the mafia as a unique way to dispose of people that they want gone. Send them back to 2044 and have a ‘Looper,’ a member of Joe’s profession, kill and burn the remains effectively destroying the evidence decades before anyone will need to look for it. The catch is that Loopers eventually have to be retired themselves, and are generally retired by themselves, unbeknown by themselves until they see themselves. Keep up with me now, we’re in the in the tall cane. Shockingly, these young assassins generally have a big night on the town after they retire themselves. But, like Logan’s Run or Minority Report, we all apt run in the end when given enough wind of what’s coming. So, when Young-Joe botches the murder Old-Joe, he has a bit of a conundrum. Actually, he has a full blown existential crisis, complicated by the fact that Old-Joe might just be Locke’s over-patched socks. That is to say, is Young-Joe really stepping on his own toes by telling Old-Joe to piss off? Or, going a step further, hunting him down for his mafia masters? From the other side of the equation, consider if you at fifty met yourself at twenty, wouldn’t you want to punch that young twerp in the face?

Would you like to know more…?

TIFF 2012: Looper Review

[SPOILER ALERT – It’s excellent. Seriously, though, if you are adverse any advance hints of plot or character in Looper, consider this review peppered with very mild spoilers that make any sort of considered review even possible in this case.]

Empiricist founding father John Locke proposed a curious scenario with of all things, his socks. It goes something like this. If you had a hole in your sock and had to patch it over, you’d probably call it the same sock, more or less. But if you developed another hole, then another, to the point where all the original material of that sock was replaced, would it still be the same sock? Rian Johnson’s fantastic time travel film asks the question, after 30 years of life (and life lessons) are you still you? Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis are playing Joe, an assassin who kills for the mafia of 2070, even if the present is 2044. Time travel may have been invented somewhere between that span of years, but it was immediately outlawed and then equally immediately co-opted by the mafia as a unique way to dispose of people that they want gone. Send them back to 2044 and have a ‘Looper,’ a member of Joe’s profession, kill and burn the remains effectively destroying the evidence decades before anyone will need to look for it. The catch is that Loopers eventually have to be retired themselves, and are generally retired by themselves, unbeknown by themselves until they see themselves. Keep up with me now, we’re in the in the tall cane. Shockingly, these young assassins generally have a big night on the town after they retire themselves. But, like Logan’s Run or Minority Report, we all apt run in the end when given enough wind of what’s coming. So, when Young-Joe botches the murder Old-Joe, he has a bit of a conundrum. Actually, he has a full blown existential crisis, complicated by the fact that Old-Joe might just be Locke’s over-patched socks. That is to say, is Young-Joe really stepping on his own toes by telling Old-Joe to piss off? Or, going a step further, hunting him down for his mafia masters? From the other side of the equation, consider if you at fifty met yourself at twenty, wouldn’t you want to punch that young twerp in the face?

Would you like to know more…?

Mamo #264: The Metatextual Implications of the Queen of England Conversing with James Bond

Mamo returns to the table and makes it round, essaying such topics as the third Hobbit movie, the recent TIFF ’12 announcements, Skyfall, The Dark Knight Rises, and the Star Trek: The Next Generation blu-rays. Grab a coffee and join us.

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo264.mp3

First Wave of TIFF. Rian Johnson’s LOOPER to open Fest.

I have to say that I’m both floored and delighted that the Toronto International Film Festival picked Rian Johnson’s Looper as their opening night film. (Not too long ago, Rian joined us for a cinecast episode). But the sci-fi action film is one of very many major titles slated for for the 2012 edition of TIFF. New films from Terrence Malick, Tom Tykwer, The Wachowskis, David O. Russell, Takeshi Kitano, Joss Whedon, Neil Jordon, J.A. Bayona, Chen Kaige, Baltasar Kormakur, Robert Redford, Joe Wright, Francois Ozon, Mira Nair, Derek “Blue Valentine” Cianfrance, Thomas Vinterberg, Noah Baumbach, Ben Affleck and many more (below.)

This is the first of many press releases from the festival (Which Variety leaked early; unfortunate for them, fortunate for us), and already the festival looks like a doozey. September cannot come fast enough!

Who is in for TIFF this year? Sound off in the comments section below on what (by the title or director) has got you excited thus far.

Initial Wave of titles.

“Looper” (Rian Johnson) (Opening Film)

“To The Wonder” (Terrence Malick)
“Cloud Atlas” (The Wachowskis & Tom Tykwer)
“Argo” (Ben Affleck)
“The Silver Linings Playbook” (David O Russell)
“Love, Marilyn” (Liz Garbus)
“Free Angela And All Political Prisoners” (Shola Lynch)
“The Place Beyond The Pines” (Derek Cianfrance)
“Midnight’s Children” (Deepa Mehta)
“Hyde Park On Hudson” (Roger Michell)
“Great Expectations” (Mike Newell)
“Inescapable” (Rubba Nadda)
“Twice Born” (Sergio Castellitto)
“English Vinglish” (Gauri Shinde)
“The Perks Of Being A Wallflower” (Stephen Chbosky)
“Thanks For Sharing” (Stuart Blumberg)
“End Of Watch” (David Ayer)
“Imogene” (Robert Puccini and Shari Springer Berman)
“A Late Quartet” (Yaron Zilberman)
“Much Ado About Nothing” (Joss Whedon)
“Frances Ha” (Noah Baumbach)
“The Time Being” (Nenad Cicin-Sain)
“Writers” (Josh Boone)
“At Any Price” (Ramin Bahrani)
“Venus And Serena” (Maiken Baird)
“Byzantium” (Neil Jordan)
“Quartet” (Dustin Hoffman)
“Ginger And Rosa” (Sally Potter)
“A Liar’s Autobiography” (Ben Timlett, Bill Jones, Jeff Simpson)
“Foxfire” (Laurnet Cantet)
“In The House” (Francois Ozon)
“The Impossible” (JA Bayona)
“Hannah Arendt (Margarethe Von Trotta)
“Mr. Pip” (Andrew Adamson)
“Capital” (Costa-Gavras)
“The Attack” (Ziad Doueriri)
“Zaytoun” (Eran Riklis)
“The Deep” (Baltasar Kormakur)
“Dreams For Sale (Nishikawa Miwa)
“The Last Supper” (Lu Chuan)
“Anna Karenina” (Joe Wright)
“The Reluctant Fundamentalist” (Mira Nair)
“The Company You Keep” (Robert Redford)
“Jayne Mansfield’s Car” (Billy Bob Thornton)
“A Royal Affair” (Nikolai Arcel)
“Dangerous Liasons” (Hur Ji-Ho)
“Thermae Romae” (Hideki Takeuchi)
“Caught In THe Web” (Chen Kaige)
“Dormant Beauty” (Marco Belloccchio)
“Everybody Has A Plan” (Ana Piterbarg w/Viggo Mortensen)
“Kon-Tiki” (Espen Sandberg)
“Reality” (Matteo Garrone)
“A Few Hours Of Spring” (Stephan Brize)
“The Hunt” (Thomas Vintenberg)
“The Iceman” (Ariel Vromen)
“Lore” (Cate Shortland)
“No” (Pablo Larrain)
“Outrage Beyond” (Takeshi Kitano)
“Rust And Bone” (Jacques Audiard)
“The Sapphires” (Wayne Blair)
“Tai Chi O” (Stephen Fung)

We Suggest You Do Not Watch The New Trailer for Time-Travel Action Film Looper

Actually, it is not only us; the director himself, Rian Johnson, tweeted: “If you’re already set on seeing Looper, I’d avoid any trailers from here on out. They don’t ruin the movie, but they tip a few little things” a few minutes ago. If you are already committed to seeing this film in September, as most of us in the third row most certainly are, then hey, why spoil things by watching the below advert for the film.

(But then again, I could not help myself and it is flat out fantastic!)

Good Friday One Sheet: H(a)unted Poster for Rian Johnson’s Looper

Seems like we’re being inundated with new trailers and posters this week, but of them all, this is the film I’m probably most excited about this year. I’m a huge fan of Rian Johnson’s Brick (my favorite film of 2005, in fact), and his follow-up The Brothers Bloom wasn’t too shabby, either. Now he’s re-teaming with Brick star Joseph Gordon-Levitt (who’s also doing pretty well in his career, if you hadn’t noticed) and adding the likes of Bruce Willis and Emily Blunt to the mix with a trippy sci-fi time travel story. And that’s all I know about the film, and all I want to know. This poster will be the last piece of marketing I look at for this film. I’m already sold.

Looper opens September 28th.

Look under the seats for the upside-down version.

Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 237 – One T or Two?

Well, Gamble’s Back. But after the Thanksgiving Weekend blow-out there is precious little in the way of new releases, making this show a Mega-sized “The Watch List” episode. Before we go there, we delve into our favourite female performances of 2011 (of all shapes and sizes.) One small observation: We talk a lot of documentaries this episode, and go over a lot of TV series; particularly Matt who was laid up with a sports injury for over three weeks and watched a metric tonne of TV/film/etc. The latest from Errol Morris, Werner Herzog, and another go around with Bellflower. Take it away Gamble.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_237.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…
Would you like to know more…?