Cinecast Episode 405 – SPECTRE-tacular

 
Kurt is back from Montreal’s Fantasia Film Festival, and he might have a thing or two to say about the movies, the town and the folks at that festival. At nearly two hours we can only say brace yourself for genre-overload. But first, Matt Gamble joins Kurt & Andrew midway through the conversation on Christopher McQuarrie’s installment of the Mission Impossible franchise. Kurt loved it. Andrew liked it. Matt, well, Matt watched it. Practical stunts, exceptional set-pieces and the ass-kicking talents of Rebecca Ferguson and a cleaned up and ready for prime time Sean Harris are all on the conversational docket. While there is no full “True Detective” segment this episode (we’ll cap the remaining three off, next time) there is a full Watch List for your listening pleasure, and Matt does briefly chime in on this season of “True Detective,” along with the doc on Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau remake disaster, and Adam Sandler’s Pixels. Andrew covers off the cult classic Wet Hot American Summer and its direct-to-Nexflix sequel. Finally we settle the Mara Rooney / Kate Mara confusion (sort of).

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 

 
 

 

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Blu-ray Review: The White Queen

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Directors: Colin Teague, James Kent, Jamie Payne
Writers: Philippa Gregory, Emma Frost, Malcolm Campbell
Producer: Gina Cronk
Starring: Rebecca Ferguson, Amanda Hale, Faye Marsay, Eleanor Tomlinson, Juliet Aubrey, Janet McTeer, Max Irons, James Frain, Aneurin Barnard, David Oakes
MPAA Rating: 18A
Running time: 580 min.


Author Philippa Gregory has been writing historical based romance for decades and though adaptations of her novels have come before, none have managed to garner much attention or fanfare. BBC, the go-to for period dramas, took on the task of adapting Gregory’s “The White Queen,” the first in a trilogy of novels set during the War of the Roses. What’s interesting about Gregory’s take is that the story is told from the point of view of the women who toiled behind the scenes to shape not only their lives but history.

“The White Queen” opens shortly after Max Irons is crowned as King Edward IV. A womanizer, he falls for a beautiful widow who stops him on the road pleading for her husband’s lands and moneys be returned to her so that her sons may have something to inherit. Smitten, Edward spends the night with Elizabeth Woodville (newcomer Rebecca Ferguson) promising to make her queen, a promise he delivers on against everyone’s wishes. As Queen, Elizabeth proves to be a force to be reckoned with, guiding Edward in affairs of the state which pit her against Richard Neville, the Earl of Warwick who is known to many as “the Kingmaker” for his ability to make and dethrone kings as it pleases, or more accurately, benefits him.

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