Death Proof @ 10

Long divorced from its Grindhouse double-feature billing which dropped into the Miramax by the Weinstein Brothers’ Dimension films in April 2007, Quentin Tarantino’s gloriously (and often misunderstood) Death Proof turns 10 today. Not only is it an exceptionally feminist revenge flick (Laura Zarum over at Flavor Wire has plenty to say on the subject), but like all of Tarantino’s work, it is eminently re-watchable. Back in April 2007 the Cinecast came into its modern 3 hour incarnation (previously episodes were well under an hour) due to a lengthy, lengthy conversation on the Grindhouse double feature, and if you go all the way back to that episode (fittingly it is episode #42!), you can hear what the hot take version was, or if you are a regular listener, you will be well aware that Death Proof comes up a lot on the show, to this day.

The Film Stage has more.
So does ComingSoon.

Trailer: Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight

Prominently featuring Kurt Russell and Samuel L. Jackson, I’m getting a very delicious Django meets The Thing vibe here. Paranoia, guns, shacks, prisoners, a laundry list of great character actors (Walton Goggins, Tim Roth, Demian Bichir, Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern, Gene Jones, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Zoe Bell) and a lot of excellent dialogue. It is oh so easy to be all in for this 70mm shot western.

Friday One Sheet: The Hateful 8

The promise of a ‘Western with winter’ in the vein of The Great Silence, Ravenous, Jeremiah Johnson or McCabe & Mrs. Miller is just about as compelling as just about anything in cinema for yours truly. You can guess at the tingle that this particularly painterly poster offers. Kudos to Quentin Tarantino and other keeping the genre alive (and this year promises to be particularly kind for gunslingers and ne’er-do-wells.) The Hateful 8 with its gritty tagline (I can practically hear that line being spoken by Kurt Russell or Bruce Dern) alongside foot prints and blood. And a collection of hardened men against the backdrop of gently falling snow. Bliss.

Cinecast Episode 364 – Fetishizing the Pen

And you may find yourself living in a shotgun shack. And you may find yourself in another part of the world. And you may find yourself behind the wheel of a large automobile. And you may find yourself in a beautiful house, with a beautiful wife. And you may find yourself in the seats of the third row. And you may ask yourself, well…How did I get here? We ask ourselves the same questions. With no main review this week, we’re stuck with our home viewings and The Talking Heads. Which is plenty when you consider the likes of Quentin Tarantino, Woody Allen, John Turturro, Fisher Stevens and James Cameron. With nothing to talk about, it’s a mouthful folks (two, actually).

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 
 

Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 360 – It’s Like Mustard

 
Sone famous once said that a person’s character can be defined by what he chooses to complain about. What do you despise? Is it Max Brooks? Is it Steve Guttenberg? The video streaming entity such as Vudu? Or is it someone/something else? By all means sound off! So yes, we explore the depths of our personal hatreds on this week’s Cinecast, but equally so, we also share some fondness, nay love, for Charles Grodin, Jean-Marc Vallée, Brent Spiner, Chris Tucker, Louis C.K. and yes, even Mel Gibson.

Documentaries and Ozploitation occupy the bulk of this week’s conversation. Steve James’ documentary, Life Itself (aka you’re better off just reading the book) and Russell Mulcahy’s creature feature, Razorback. But, and this is important. don’t even bother downloading this show until you’ve purchased your 4-pack of Midnight Run sequels. Yeah, it’s that kind of show.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 
 

Would you like to know more…?

Mamo #285: 2012 Unchained

Happy new year! Mamo casts its eyes back on the year 2012, the year in which the Avengers assembled, the Dark Knight rose, and the words “Mayan apocalypse” turned out to be referring to Taylor Kitsch’s career. The Matts give a broad survey of what worked, what didn’t work, and what were (in our wide and varied opinions) the best films of the year.

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo285.mp3

Review: Django Unchained

Django

After watching Jamie Foxx boldly strut on a chestnut mare with circular-lensed shades through the sunny Mississippi countryside, I find it almost impossible to imagine Wil Smith doing the same without bringing the bulk of Quentin Tarantino’s Western/Southern enterprise crashing down. There is a steely gravitas to Foxx (see also Jarhead, Miami Vice) that works when he evolves to cowboy super-shooter (and instrument of revenge), but more importantly, there is a generous yet unassuming vulnerability when he plays off Christoph Waltz that makes the picture decidedly human amongst all the heroic bloodshed, sweaty mandingo wrestling, horse murder, and flowery language. The look and tone of the film is as grab bag as the range of its cinematic influences. Moments that recall John Ford’s Monument Valley grandeur and snowy echoes of Sergio Corbucci’s The Great Silence sit uneasily against the farcical parody of Birth of A Nation‘s ride of the Klan (feat. Jonah Hill!) or a man being violently torn apart by dogs. Django Unchained may feel like a 10 hour HBO miniseries crushed down to just under 3 hours, but it is a cornucopia of delights and it does what its director does best. That is to say, let great actors have memorable scenes of dialogue (or silence) together, whilst setting the non-acting scenes to exceptionally curated music.

Would you like to know more…?