Friday One Sheet: The Killing Of A Sacred Deer

Yorgos Lanthimos Killing of a Sacred Deer is so nice that I had to see it twice, at different festivals on opposite sides of the world. All of the posters for his films have been noteworthy, and while this one is not quite as remarkable as the first poster, which happens to be my favourite one-sheet of 2017, it is a curious design. Upside down, kind of collage-y and I’m not exactly sure if Nicole Kidman’s neck is really that long, or it is just a trick of the eyes with the superposition. But this one is certain to cause double takes if it happens to be hanging at the local multiplex.

Trailer: Sophia Coppola’s The Beguiled

I am not sure how much of the trailer for Sophia Coppola’s new film is a spoiler or not. I’ve never read Thomas P. Cullinan’s novel, A Painted Devil, nor have I seen the Don Siegel/Clint Eastwood 1971 version of the film. I am guessing the marketing department figures with the existence of other properties, might as well sell the ‘turn’ to get butts in seats. Maybe. Either way, I am always interested in movies set in hermetically sealed boarding schools or orphanages, be in Picnic At Hanging Rock, Cracks, Melody, The Devil’s Backbone or If… And I’m all in with Sophia Coppola as a filmmaker, so when she assembles Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell, Elle Fanning, Kristen Dunst and others to be in a highly sexualized Civil War pressure cooker, well, it’s a pretty easy sell, spoilers or no.

The Beguiled will be in competition at the Cannes Film Festival in May. Hopefully it will get booed, because, as everyone knows, the films that get booed at Cannes are the ones that end up being pretty amazing. Coppola herself would not be new to the experience, because her own Marie Antoinette (an superb bit of contemporary film-making applied to a period piece) was rejected by the Cannes intelligentsia, but went on to be great, in spite of it.

The story unfolds during the American Civil War, at a Southern girls’ boarding school. Its sheltered young women take in an injured enemy soldier. As they provide refuge and tend to his wounds, the house is taken over with sexual tension and dangerous rivalries./blockquote>

Occultober – Day 18 – Eyes Wide Shut

Eyes Wide Shut
The password is “Fidelio.”

This might be a stretch, but there is no denying the visual and sonic power of the super-elite secret society meeting that is at the heart of Stanley Kubrick’s final film masterpiece, Eyes Wide Shut. Naked women are bathed in incense smoke before pairing off for frenzied sexual encounters for the viewing pleasure of grey-haired and Venetian masked ‘Illuminati’ in a massive New York Estate mansion.

This is only one incident in a night filled with so many potential sexual encounters and prostitution oddities, that the phrase ‘dream-logic’ is often applied when describing the experience. But then again, everything looks stranger and sexier at night. Most especially so for the state of Dr. Bill (Tom Cruise) just after told by his wife (Nicole Kidman) in an evenings indulgence with marijuana, that she almost ended their relationship years ago solely from sexual heat generated by merely a glance of a passing naval officer – and this while on holiday with their baby girl. While there is nothing overtly (or concretely) occult about Eyes Wide Shut, the whole film emanates a paranoid ‘other-ness’ of a man un-moored from what he thought was his perfect life. It has that ‘everyone is watching me’ conspiracy feel that is generated so effectively in classic Satan-pictures like Race With The Devil and Rosemary’s Baby. You’re not paranoid, Tom Cruise, if they’re really following you.

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Trailer: Grace Of Monaco

GraceOfMonacoStill

It seems that we’ve been waiting for some time for the release of Olivier Dahan’s Grace of Monaco. The movie was originally due late last year and then delayed, likely due to the fact that the family didn’t care for Dahan and writer Arash Amel’s take on Grace Kelly and looking at the trailer, it’s easy to see why the family would have apprehensions.

I’m only familiar with Kelly as a Hollywood starlet and always assumed that she’d left her life in the spotlight of the silver screen for a slightly different type spotlight and that she was happy there but it appears that her life, like real life, was not a perfect fairy tale.

Nicole Kidman stars as Grace and Tim Roth as her prince, Rainier III, in a tale that seems to cover a troubled year of Kelly and Rainier’s marriage as she deals with the pull of her old life and the realities of her new one.

I haven’t seen any of Dahan’s other films but I do love myself some Kidman action and Roth is always fantastic not to mention that the inclusion of Frank Langella as Father Francis Tucker, Kelly’s confidant, makes me quite happy. And who am I kidding, I love a good bit of romantic drama. I don’t expect it’ll be particularly hard hitting but it does looks like a great bit of entertainment. It won’t take much to be better than Diana.

Grace of Monaco opens in the UK on June 6. No indication as to when it’ll open domestically.

Grace of Monaco to open Cannes 2014

The Nicole Kidman starring biopic (of sorts) on Grace Kelly has been selected as the big opening night film of the 2014 edition of Festival de Cannes. On Wednesday 14 May, at the Grand Théâtre Lumière of the Palais des Festivals, Oliver Dahan’s Grace of Monaco will open the festival and will play out of competition. Past openers have included Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby, Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom and Fernando Meirelles’ Blindness

And it wouldn’t be Cannes without a little controversy. as there is currently a bit of a feud going on between Dahan and The Weinstein Company over final cut of the film. It will be the ‘Director’s Cut’ shown at Cannes, while the film’s March release date has been pulled until the dispute sorts itself out.

Grace of Monaco portrays a period in the life of American Actress Grace Kelly who became Princess Grace of Monaco when she married Prince Rainier III in 1956, in what was dubbed “the marriage of the century”. An Oscar winner, she was already a huge film star, having worked with the very greatest directors – John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Fred Zinnemann – and was famous the world over. Six months later, amid occasional difficulties in fulfilling her role, she was invited back to Hollywood by Alfred Hitchcock, to play in his new film Marnie.

Cinecast Episode 299 – Techincally, Literally and Actually

We don’t have much to get into today. Mostly were just shaking in our boots about the expectations for Episode 300. So far we’ve got nothing but we’ll figure out what to do for something at least a little bit different. For today, it’s all Park Chan-Wook and trying to pronounce Mia Wasikowska. Love doesn’t quite do it justice. Be prepared for SPOILERS though. We look forward to the next couple of episodes and Kurt gives brief impressions of his thoughts on Dreamworks’ The Croods, which we’ll talk a little bit more about later this week.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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Review: Stoker

When Pauline Kael wrote off The Coen Brothers’ 1984 debut, Blood Simple, she had this to say: “Reviewers who hail the film as a great début and rank the Coens with Welles, Spielberg, Hitchcock, and Sergio Leone may be transported by seeing so many tricks and flourishes from sources they’re familiar with. But the reason the camera whoop-de-do is so noticeable is that there’s nothing else going on.”

Nearly 30 years later, style as substance has pretty much won the day as much as extruded franchised dinguses (and at the risk of boiling American Cinema down to two camps, I certainly prefer the former to the latter endless string of blockbuster product.) The South Koreans have been elevating arch style and glossy violence since the start of this young century. After dominating Japanese culture for a number years, and getting every single person on the goddamn planet to watch Psy’s Gangnam Style video on YouTube, it was only a matter of time before Busan’s top directors started coming to America to make Hollywood movies with caucasian A-listers. Earlier this year, it was Kim Ji Woon with The Last Stand, and later this year it will be Bong Joon Ho with Snow Piercer, but right here, right now, it is Park Chan-Wook with Stoker. Put aside any concerns that the Korean auteur’s particular style of filmmaking would be in any way dulled, diluted or even perverted by his entrance into Hollywood system. Putting his more literal vampire film, Thirst, aside for a moment, Stoker feels like the logical cultural transition from his cult ‘Vengeance’ Trilogy, a set of films that seemed to get more classy -and classical- as they went along. Here, his collaboration with screenwriter Wentworth Miller, handsomely merges Shadow of a Doubt and Let The Right One In together inside the tasteful glass house of Joseph Losey’s The Servant. Stoker is a hermetically sealed coming of age film with a taste for blood and emotional straight jackets. One of many exquisite images in the film is of candles on a birthday cake so casually extinguished whereupon a crystal casing is put over top of the lit flames, effectively and cutting off the oxygen, but allowing the smoke to linger in suspension. It is a telling enough portrait of the family dynamic to follow.

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Cinecast Episode 278 – Evolve or Die

After festival vacations took hold of both your respective hosts, we’re back for a whole lot of catch-up. We mix up the format a bit with a bit of Disney/Lucasfilm discussion before jumping into reviews of Cloud Atlas (SPOILERS!) and Lee Daniel’s even wackier The Paperboy (SPOILERS!), grading the homework assignments, recaps of said festivals and a further Watch List that jumps from goofy to subversive X-rated classics to gentle (yet badass) angels of doom. It all culminates lengthy show, you’ve been warned.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
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Full show notes are under the seats…
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Nic Cage and Nic Kidman go VOD: Trespass Trailer

 

Proving that Port of Call New Orleans (Kurt’s Review) was the exception more than the rule for glossy exploiters, Millennium Films, aka the modern day Golan-Globus/Cannon, along comes a movie that stars both Nicholas Cage and Nicole Kidman, has a wildly commercial concept, and yet it is straight to DVD. And this after the company managed to foist crap such as 88 Minutes and Righteous Kill into the multiplex (Maybe Al Pacino is the key…)

Trespass is a hostage/heist film directed by Joel Schumacher (Batman & Robin, The Lost Boys) with a lot of chrome and expensive wood, but apparently very little brains. How do I make this assessment after only viewing a trailer, well, the trailer gives the whole plot away. Typical Millennium, typical.

In a private, wealthy community, priority is placed on security and no exception is made for the Miller family’s estate. Behind their pristine walls and manicured gardens, Kyle, a fast-talking businessman, has entrusted the mansion’s renovation to his stunning wife, Sarah. But between making those big decisions and keeping tabs on their defiant teenage daughter, Sarah often finds herself distracted by a young, handsome worker at their home. Nothing is what it seems, and it will take a group of cold-blooded criminals led by Elias, who have been planning a vicious home invasion for months, to bring the Miller family together. When they storm the manor, everyone is tangled up in betrayal, deception, temptation and scheming. Kyle, Sarah and Avery will take the ultimate risk to make it out with their lives – and their family – intact.

The trailer is tucked under the seat.
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Cinecast Episode 224 – Sundancey

 
 
Sorry for the delay folks. We had a problem with a batch of bandwidth gremlins, as Kurt like to call them. But fear not, the show is as strong as ever and continues on with a more positive wave length than I can remember for a long time. Since we’re in such high spirits, it’s only natural we talk about dentistry and weather patterns to start the show. But then it’s to reviews for Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Mike Cahill’s Another Earth. Beware, both of these discussions are ** VERY HEAVY ON SPOILERS!! **. If you’re worried about the spoiler thing, just fast forward ahead as we have lots to dive into with this week’s Watch List; from afro-hair to life saving taxi drivers to Donald Sutherland in a toga, it’s quite the diverse show. And because it’s Andrew’s birthday… he is always correct for the duration of this recording.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_224.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…
Would you like to know more…?