Posts Tagged ‘Michael Fassbender’

  • Prometheus 2: King David

    0
    Prometheus

    When all was done and said (and said, and said, and said) about Ridley Scott’s Alien prequel, my final conclusion was that the film was ultimately far more about Michael Fassbender’s David character, an inquisitive android who perhaps oversteps his bounds against his human creators, than Noomi Rapace’s Elizabeth Shaw (an altruistic human who perhaps oversteps her bounds against her own cosmic creators). Either way, both characters have an open-ending upon the films final shot leaving them slightly battered, but free to cruise the stars and have further adventures in some capacity.

    It turns out, according to The Wrap (and the internet echo chamber) that there will be a follow up, likely focusing on David. Ridley Scott is eyeing the Prometheus sequel for the director’s job; which of course assumes his health at nearly 80 permits such a huge effort as another Alien film. Twentieth Century Fox has hired the writers of Transcendence (Wally Pfister’s directorial debut about a man/machine hybrid forcefully commandeering the planet’s collective technology) and Green Lantern (yea, that one that lost Warner Brothers a few shekels) to cobble a screenplay together.

    We generally don’t focus on news items at this site, we wait for a trailer or at least a proper production still. But I cannot help myself here, as a rather enthusiastic fan of the messy but beautiful 2012 film, I hope this gets made and that they hit their targeted 2016 release date.

  • Cinecast Episode 327 – Building Gazebos

    16


    You might be interested in Kurt’s rather epic, “Kermode-ian,” Ender’s Game rant which tackles one of the key issues with modern blockbuster storytelling. He uses Gavin Hood’s slipshod execution and shading as a kind of Case Study in lazy storytelling and not realizing how rich the material one has at hand. But before that, there is a more civilized and in depth conversation on Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave which looks at what the likely future Best Picture winner does well, and where it perhaps mis-steps. Andrew grades the homework assignments, and hands out a new one, regarding World War I films. And a lengthy watchlist segment sees a couple of underrated Wes Anderson titles under discussion (well, full out praise is more like it), the laundry list of V/H/S 2 failures, a little love of body horror-comedy in James Gunn’s Slither, some talk on Kubrick’s The Shining and A Clockwork Orange, Tarantino’s Kill Bill as it quickly approaches being a decade old, and the ‘it’s not for us’ aspects of Steven Spielberg’s Warhorse.

    As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


    show


    show


    show

     


     

    Here is the Music Player. You need to installl flash player to show this cool thing!


    DOWNLOAD mp3 | 120 MB
    if player is not working, try alternate player at bottom of this post

     

     
     
    Full show notes are under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Cinecast Episode 326 – Functionally Retarded, Yet Infectious

    22

    As it turns out, we discover as a very welcome surprise that this is Kurt and Andrew’s 300th episode together. So there’s reason enough to celebrate here. Kinda. But if you’re more into movies rather than nostalgia and landmarks, there’s plenty to get into with this episode. We have five, count ‘em five, theatrical reviews to get to as well as our respective festival titles and experiences to mention. All of this spirals into a very important homework assignment for the week. Matt Gamble comes aboard to talk about Ridley Scott’s meandering. We get into all manner of awesome, including Robert Redford’s double takes, Polanski spelling it out, Elijah Wood is perpetually twelve years old and Judd Apatow’s version of a Richard Linklater film. All of this and a helluva lot more in another mega-episode that spans nearly four hours.

    As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


    show


    show


    show

     


     

    Here is the Music Player. You need to installl flash player to show this cool thing!


    DOWNLOAD mp3 | 158 MB
    if player is not working, try alternate player at bottom of this post

     

     
     
    Full show notes are under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Trailer: X-Men Days of Future Past

    9

    X-Men

    Fan service, or does the X-Men crossover pic actually have something actually to say? Who knows, but the trailer company they hired to cut this should be fired for slapping two of the most over-used trailer background music (from the Sunshine soundtrack and The Thin Red Line soundtrack). Both pieces have been used in far better trailers (The Adjustment Bureau uses the former and both Pearl Harbor and 12 Years A Slave, use the latter).

    As for X-Men: Days of Future Past, the cast he is positively loaded with talent, but the issue was always too many cast members, now they have practically doubled things by moving across time lines. Judging from what we are teased with here, the whole thing is consistent with the X-Men franchise (now back to its original director, Bryan Singer) but offers little to get excited from beyond the excessive fanboy factor (and timeline continuity splitting was also recently done with the Star Trek reboot). Time will certainly tell as they cut better trailers for this property.

    From Wikipedia (on the comic-book source material which is impossible to tell if they radically rewrote the film or not, so take with a grain of salt):

    The storyline alternates between present day of 1980, in which the X-Men fight Mystique’s Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, and a future timeline, taking place in 2013, is caused by the X-Men’s failure to prevent the Brotherhood from assassinating Senator Robert Kelly. In this future universe, Sentinels rule the United States, and mutants live in internment camps. The present-day X-Men are forewarned of the possible future by a future version of their teammate Kitty Pryde, whose mind traveled back in time and possessed her younger self to warn the X-Men. She succeeds in her mission and returns to the future, but despite her success, the future timeline still exists as an alternative timeline rather than as the actual future.

  • Trailer: Sail with Ridley Scott’s Counselor

    23

    One expects no less than handsome marketing and presentation from director Ridley Scott. And what an effective use of Awoldnation’s super-simple “Sail” to establish an editing rhythm of the piece. Great character beats and strange hair (a mark of potential film excellence if Skyfall and No Country For Old Men have anything to say about it) on Javier Bardem When the first trailers and teasers started appearing for his film based on a Cormac McCarthy original screenplay, The Counselor, it certainly warmed the cockles of my heart to see him tackle a noir-ish little thriller which such an A-list cast.

  • Trailer for Ridley Scott’s The Counselor Showcases its A-List Cast

    3

    Pitt. Fassbender. Bardem. Cruz. Diaz. And the fastest Land Mammal on Earth. These are the things that the teaser trailer wants you to know about the new thriller from Ridley Scott. The title cards helpfully announces that Cormac McCarthy is on screenwriting duty. Ridley Scott gets all the best people. The cast here is so deep (and the teaser so short) they fail to mention or show Bruno Ganz, John Leguizamo, Rubén Blades, Hank (Dean Norris) from Breaking Bad or Margaery (Natalie Dormer) from Game of Thrones.

    The Counselor tells the story of a lawyer, played by Fassbender, who finds himself in over his head when he gets involved in drug trafficking. It appears to do so with copious amounts of style and production value. No surprise considering the director. These are the types of movies I hope Hollywood keeps getting opportunities to make, and I hope the final film lives up to this brief tease.

  • Cinecast Episode 261 – The Occam’s Razor Situation

    232

    The lengthiest movie review in Cinecast History is at your finger tips. We get so in depth at one point that it evolves into a discussion on the possibility of a “Hogan’s Heroes” movie adaptation. Life, death, God, David, DNA, magic slime, helmets, Earth(?), mohawks, 3D, murals, exploding heads, inconsistencies, Patrick Wilson, abortion, space Jesus, fuckheads, disdain, archaeology, love, Charles Dance, old man make-up, David Lean, sex, Christmas, Benedict Wong, dreams, zombies, Moore’s Law, Christopher Lee, Gordon Pinsent, Scotland and Spaceballs. It’s all here. Then about 2 minutes of The Watch List and some solid recognition The Little Rowthree Cinematic Achievers Club (and proud, we are, of all of them)! Matt rounds out the show with a lengthy story about owning a football team. “Don’t eat the penis, it’s just garnish.”

    As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


     
     

     

    To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
    http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_12/episode_261.mp3

     
     
    Full show notes are under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Prometheus’s David 8

    15

    If you haven’t already seen this yet, it continues the trend of Ridley Scott’s Prometheus doing some of the best viral-style marketing in years. This one likely does not contain any spoilers; although, who knows, really. Perhaps even knowing that the ubiquitous Michael Fassbender is playing the android in this film is a spoiler. The Irish actor will join *ALIEN FRANCHISE SPOILER ALERT* Ian Holm, Lance Henrikson, and Winona Ryder in the franchise’s long standing tradition of having a non-human crew member on ride. Judging by this promotional video, it looks like he will do nicely.

    Below is a faux-advertisement paid for by the Weyland Corporation for their version of Nexus 6 android. Meet David 8 the robot hates poverty and war and who can cry upon command. He is here to help and do the things that real people may find (*beat*) distressing. He just wants to help out.

  • VIDEO Review: Steven Soderbergh and Ass Kickin’ Women

    0

    Do you like to ‘watch your review’ instead of reading it? Well, you are in luck, because we have a second take (from the same reviewer) on the Steven Soderbergh’s Haywire, that puts it in context to a landmark 1960s wuxia watershed: Come Drink With Me. This is my shot at trying to be articulate via those fine folks over at The Substream.

    Or you can ‘read’ the review here.

  • Review: HAYWIRE

    15

    Welcome to January, folks – the month when studios tend to dump their dogs into the theatres. If you are not looking to play catch up on the pre-Christmas derby of Oscar hopefuls working their way to a wider release or partaking of the blockbusters deemed too ‘holiday’ for the summer season, you may be on the prowl for one of those buried gems of quality nestled amongst the Hollywood trash heap. Steven Soderbergh makes a solid case for the no-nonsense action thriller, and a bid for a few of your shekels, with Haywire. The film does nothing particularly novel. Another expendable super-spy chase slash revenge picture of which there were at least three of last year – Colombiana, Hanna and Ghost Protocol – and features neither an extravagance for expensive set-pieces nor the over-inflated high stakes. But what then separates this from last year, or a multitude of straight-to-video Jason Statham vehicles is this classic Roger Ebert bon mot, “It’s not what you do but how you do it,” which certainly applies here; even something that feels like this particular filmmaker could do in his sleep has such a precise polish and rhythm that not a second of this film feels superfluous. There are enough little touches and intangables to forgive Haywire for having nothing whatsoever to say other than Soderbergh knows his craft. The film is a walkthrough of all the things that director favours and have been showcased in his prolific c.v. The film knows to be lean and mean and is completely unpretentious about its execution.

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Trailer #2: Shame

    0

    Want the heart and soul of Steve McQueen’s second feature, Shame (Kurt’s Review) in 2 minutes? Marvelous editing, it’s like a micro-film in itself. Clearly the ad company have identified the signature scene in the film, one Carey Mulligan crooning New York, New York in a private performance for her brother in the film, played by Micheal Fassbender. Polarizing or not, this one is worth checking out when it drops in an Arthouse near you.

    Check out the 2nd US Trailer for Shame, tucked under the seat.
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Trailer: Shame

    0

    One of the more polarizing films amoungst my social circles at last years TIFF, Steve McQueen’s follow up to the highly acclaimed Hunger, the equally succinct titled Shame (Kurt’s Review) widens the canvas by having it set in New York City, and drops the directors fascination with macro lenses. One of the stand-out shots in the film is an extended jogging scene where Michael Fassbender shakes off his mounting series of problems with sex addiction and family. It is used here exceptionally well to assemble a trailer for the film.

    The trailer is tucked under the seat.
    » Read the rest of the entry..

Page 1 of 212»