Trailer: Men & Chicken

A lot of people get confessional, or get hit on the head (often both at the same time) in Anders Thomas Jensen’s farcical comedy, Men & Chicken Starring Mads Mikkelsen, Nikolaj Lie Kaas, Nicolas Bro and many other familiar Danish faces, the film is about a pair of socially-challenged siblings who discover they are adopted half-brothers in their late father’s videotaped will. Their journey in search of their true father takes them to the small, insular Danish island of Ork, where they stumble upon three additional half-brothers—each also sporting hereditary harelips and lunatic tendencies—living in a dilapidated mansion overrun by barn animals. Hitting ensues.

Drafthouse films acquired the film, and have cut a domestic trailer for the film which they are releasing very soon.

Cinecast Episode 386 – Singing From My Hymn Book

 
Bread and butter. The Salvation is ours this episode, and it is all Mads Mikkelsen will get from the dawn of the oil era in the western United States. The Danish Western shot in South Africa plays as a metaphor for USA style Capitalism – a revenge movie where there will definitely be blood (even if it is all CGI) engenders a good hour of (*spoiler filled*) conversation. Our viewpoints differ, but ultimately the same conclusion is reached: the film is exploitative and pretty decent even if it is often unpleasant.

From there, The Watch List takes over as Kurt catches a few moments from the new Pixar feature and cautiously claims that they may have climbed from the pit of safe mediocrity that they have chosen to dwell in over the past few years. Andrew wanted more of Eva Green’s assets (her voice) and tries the 300 side-quel on for size. Kurt finds one of the key inspirations for Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom a sweet little puppy-love slice of life called, Melody. We close out the show with the much talked about doc-mini, “The Jinx,” which is catching headlines and turning heads, and we are not immune to the charms and the crutches of documentary film making.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 

 
 

Would you like to know more…?

MSPIFF 2013 Review: The Hunt

 


 

Director: Thomas Vinterberg
Writers: Thomas Vinterberg, Tobias Lindholm
Producers: Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann, Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Mads Mikkelsen, Thomas Bo Larsen, Annika Wedderkopp, Lasse Fogelstrøm
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 115 min.
Country of Origin: Denmark

 

There is no arguing the craft on display in Thomas Vinterberg’s small-town, big-drama The Hunt. Mads Mikkelsen turns in the performance of his career (and if you look back on his career so far that is an impressive feat) as Lucas, a volunteer teacher at a kindergarden school who is accused and, later, ritually abused by his own friends & neighbors after one of his students, young Klara (in a fit of childish pique) accuses him of ‘pointing his willie’ at her. The cinematography, all warm and woody prior to the accusation and all white and frigid when the milk is spilt. The supporting characters all play their parts to whip the audience into a conflicting bit of rage at how a) we hate pedophiles and b) how we hate to see others rush to judgement. Sure, it feels OK when we do it.

When I see the Zentropa logo come up in front of a film, my knee-jerk reaction is that the film will be a provocation. After all, Lars von Trier is not only one of the co-founders of the company that deals in that sort of cinema but he created the Dogme95 movement with Vinterberg as well. Their previous film, Dear Wendy, springs to mind as something that is both hysterical and hysterically funny. The Hunt is not that exactly, its satire more sublimated; it aims to tickle a slightly more refined dramatic palette. But it is guilty of leading the witness, both literally in one particular interrogation in the film, and figuratively as it piles on a lot of emotional baggage instead of letting Mikkelsen’s fab performance stand on his own.

Lucas is going through a chilly divorce with custody of his teenage son in the balance, but otherwise he is a ‘head held high, feet on the ground’ sort of guy in town and a central figure in the circle of men (who hunt) in the rural community. In particular, his best friend Theo, who is father of Kayla, has a long standing friendship based partly in male goofing off, but warm and trusting. He is tentatively dating the only non-local (English speaking) woman at the kindergarten school and he seems to have the most fun at the school with the kids. Hell, it’s Christmas! If you’ve watched movies before, then you know where this is going. You will intuitively feel the beats of this story, even as Vinterberg does his best to keep the audience on its toes with weird indicators and ominously misleading bits foreshadowing.

Would you like to know more…?

Trailer: The Hunt

There is no denying the fall beauty in Thomas Vinterberg’s drama, The Hunt. There is no denying that Mads Mikkelsen gives a major performance as the kindergarten volunteer who gets ostracized from his small community when a young child (falsely) accuses him of inappropriate touching. Yet I still had some issues when I saw the film at TIFF last year. You can decide for yourself from the new trailer, below.

TIFF 2012: The Hunt Review

There is no arguing the craft on display in Thomas Vinterberg’s small-town, big-drama The Hunt. Mads Mikkelsen turns in the performance of his career (and if you look back on his career so far that is an impressive feat) as Lucas, a volunteer teacher at a kindergarden school who is accused and, later, ritually abused by his own friends & neighbors after one of his students, young Klara (in a fit of childish pique) accuses him of ‘pointing his willie’ at her. The cinematography, all warm and woody prior to the accusation and all white and frigid when the milk is spilt. The supporting characters all play their parts to whip the audience into a conflicting bit of rage at how a) we hate pedophiles and b) how we hate to see others rush to judgement. Sure, it feels OK when we do it.

When I see the Zentropa logo come up in front of a film, my knee-jerk reaction is that the film will be a provocation. After all, Lars von Trier is not only one of the co-founders of the company deals in that sort of cinema but he created with Dogme95 movement with Vinterberg as well. Their previous previous Dear Wendy, springs to mind as something that is both hysterical and hysterically funny. The Hunt is not that exactly, its satire more sublimated, it aims to tickle a slightly more refined dramatic palette. But it is guilty of leading the witness, both literally in one particular interrogation in the film, and figuratively as it piles on a lot of emotional baggage instead of letting Mikkelsen’s fab performance stand on his own. Lucas is going through a chilly divorce with custody of his teenage son in the balance, but otherwise he is a ‘head held high, feet on the ground’ sort of guy in town and a central figure in the circle of men (who hunt) in the rural community. In particular, his best friend Theo, who is father of Kayla, has a long standing friendship based partly in male goofing off, but warm and trusting. He is tentatively dating the only non-local (english speaking) woman at the kindergarden school and he seems to have the most fun at the school with the kids. Hell, it’s Christmas! If you’ve watched movies before, then you know where this is going. You will intuitively feel the beats of this story, even as Vinterberg does his best to keep the audience on its toes with weird indicators and ominously misleading bits foreshadowing.

Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 192 – Rub the Fuzzy Wall

 
 
It is a two man operation today, a very casual (and lengthy) conversation of a wide variety of movies. First up is a mixed, but leaning towards positive, review of Edward Zwick’s Love and Other Drugs, which features good chemistry between Jake Gyllenhaal and Anne Hathaway, but a very mixed bag of tonal shifts. Then we talk a little TV with The Walking Dead. We revisit a number of (relatively) recent films from what is predictable about Predators to what is excellent about Duplicity to what is slightly baffling about Walker, Don’t Look Back and Get Him to The Greek. The video-game as a childrens film in French CGI oddity The Dragon Hunters, and how this similar themed movie differs from Dreamworks’ How To Train Your Dragon is discussed for a while. Then it is back into documentary land for an extensive revisit of King of Kong, as well as credit card debt and the state of the nation (circa 2005-06) documentary, Maxed Out. Andrew makes a case for The Illusionist, and talks about the use of music in Black Snake Moan. We close on all things Kubrick and Steadicam with The Shining and Birth. And some DVD love for Disney and Vikings and Mixed Martial Arts Melodrama. Pull a seat up to the digital fireplace, grab and Brandy and a cigar and lets talk some turkey.

As always, feel free to join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and as always, thanks for listening!

 


 

 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_192.mp3

ALTERNATIVE (no music track):
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_192-alt.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…
Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 189 – Just a Symptom of 1986

It is again that wonky time of year where studios favour the platform release, getting in the way of folks from Toronto and Minneapolis having a friendly movie chat about the same darn movies. Instead, we must be content with Multiplex Matt Gamble and the mainstream mega-release. Here he gives some thoughts on Todd Phillips’ newest, Due Date and tries to break down some pre-conceived notions. There is also some talk of the Asian Film Festival. Kurt gives a snippet of reaction to Danny Boyle’s follow-up to his Oscar win, 127 Hours. It is likely that the boys will revisit this one at some point for a consensus discussion, but as a nice double bill with the other ‘trapped between a rock and a hard place’ movie Buried there is a fair bit of stuff to chew on. Meanwhile Andrew finds solace in the comfort of his Blu-ray player… sometimes twice a day. Peter Weir is revisited in a lengthy discussion on The Mosquito Coast and also some Picnic at Hanging Rock, Master & Commander, The Truman Show and of course, the upcoming The Way Back. DVD picks and Japanese pornography are also on the bill.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 
 

 
 

 


 
Full show notes are under the seats…
Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 186 – Happy Yummy Super Audience

 
 
Kurt makes a triumphantly verbose return to Western civilization after a week on the Spanish Mediterranean coast. With the 43rd Annual Sitges Film Festival coinciding with the trip there is much filmery to be discussed including the new Woody Allen, Zhang Yimou’s Blood Simple remake, Max Von Sydow’s seemingly advanced age in The Exorcist, dark social media experiments (no not Catfish or The Social Network, these are apocalyptic European takes on Web 2.0) and a Mads Mikkelsen time traveling thriller with The Door. Andrew sat down with some highly praised foreign fare from 2009 (including more Mads and the Oscar winning Argentinian entry, The Secret in Her Eyes) while Gamble also hits us with a sneak review of Helen Mirren shooting up cars in Red and reports on the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink camera work in a tiny box for 90 minutes with Ryan Reynolds in Buried. Playing off the Jackass 3D hype, quite the energetic discussion ensues on theater crowds and whether films are better with or without others around you. A few tangents here and there with loads of good stuff on DVD. All this and more in episode 186!

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 
 

 
 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_186.mp3

ALTERNATIVE (no music track):
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_186-alt.mp3

 




 
Full show notes are under the seats…
Would you like to know more…?

Clashing Titans…I’m Watching You!

Mads MikkelsenI’d heard some rumblings that the Hollywood machine was looking to update Clash of the Titans, a movie I haven’t seen in decades but of which I still remember specific elements (mostly Harryhausen’s effects). Until this point, I hadn’t been particularly interested in the production which had already signed Louis Leterrier (of The Incredible Hulk, Transporter 2 and Danny the Dog fame) and Sam Worthington (who is certain to make a splash when Terminator Salvation opens later this year) but the announcement of a new addition to the cast has caught my attention.

News today is that in addition to Worthington playing Perseus, Mads Mikkelsen will also star in the film, taking on the role of Draco, the leader of the Praetorian Guard that accompanies the questing hero. Not exactly a role I’d have guessed Mikkelsen to be interested in but after a bit of though, I recalled his appearance in Antoine Fuqua’s King Arthur, another action/adventure epic.

The addition of Mikkelsen doesn’t completely get me on board but it helps. I’m just not sure how a mythical story like this one will play to today’s audience and though I’ve enjoyed Leterrier’s work, I’m not convinced he’s the right guy to direct. That said, they’ve got my attention.