Cinecast Episode 484 – It’s Unfunny ‘Cause It’s True

The reviews for Baywatch were simply too toxic for even Andrew to stomach, and so it was a stay at home and check out the latest offerings from Netflix kind of week. Luckily Brad Pitt and Tilda Swinton step in to hopefully offer up something militarily wondrous over the Memorial Holiday weekend with War Machine. But does the material match up to the cast/performances? Also, while The Bad Batch does not hit theaters for a month or so, we managed to get into a sneak peek screening and so have a decent discussion on Ana Lily Amirpour’s sophomore effort. It’s one of those films (with empirical evidence provided herein) that requires a second watch to truly appreciate. The Watch List has a documentary double-dose, a 90s Oscar contender, home invasion meets slasher flick, the capture of Osama Bin Laden and we close it all off with some joyful misogyny courtesy of India.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

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Cinecast Episode 464 – These Violent Delights

Through snow, cold, rain, holidays or malware, The Cinecast finds a way. Yes, despite RowThree being down for cleaning over the past few days, the boys managed to do some catch-up on 2016 movie releases get it all down on virtual tape. This week, Kurt and Andrew get into Todd Solondz’ “awkward comedy” Wiener-Dog and Kurt hits the theater for Jessica Chastain in Miss Sloane… maybe wishes he hadn’t. HBO finished up its first season of “Westworld” and the boys dig through that mess of wires and mazes. As always beware of SPOILERS! For The Watch List, Andrew works on catching up on some other 2016 movies that slipped through the cracks including Tom Hanks, Michael Shannon, Seth Rogen and more. Kurt spent his time hitting the big screen versions of some older gems including Meet me in St. Louis and Tampopo. Also Michael Keaton continues to own the twilight years of his career; this time by owning a McDonald’s franchsie. Join us on this joy ride.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

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Cinecast Episode 342 – Nobody is Happy After a Three Way

 
The only regret on this episode is that Matt Gamble couldn’t get Frank (from Film Junk) to cry at some point. From Kurt’s drunken obsession with the female form (seriously folks, it is profound) to Andrew’s bafflement at the hatred for Colin Farrell’s lens flares. It’s a good thing Ryan McNeil is somewhat of a veteran of the show as it takes a special type of mortal to endure this kind of full throttle podcast that only the Cinecast can deliver. Lessons learned: Kurt may or may not have had a three-way, gigolos are “amazing”, Robin Wright’s labia is probably what was in Marcellus Wallace’s brief case. Amongst all the tomfoolery, there is a debate on the merits of the Second Indiana Jones film and Amber Heard should retire yesterday. It’s all in here along with plenty more. Thanks to our guests for sticking it out late; it was a show for the ages – yet we magically come in at under three hours – this is what passes for ‘concentrated’ with this podcast…

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 


 

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Cinecast Episode 290 – Great Tatts

And we’re back! Almost like we never left. Almost. With the new season of the Cinecast starting up we’re going to be trying some new things. We get privy on all the new shit while we get our bearings on this cold weather to open up the show. Then we dig into the second film of a trend in Hollywood for 2013 of “old action stars attempting a come-back” in Bullet in the Head. We enjoyed the Schwarzenegger version, can Stallone compare? Also Kevin Spacey is back to work within the U.S. government in David Fincher’s, Netflix original series “House of Cards.” Check out all the news ideas and we’ll be back later in the week to assess.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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From our Netflix Queue

With the growing popularity of Netflix instant streaming in the U.S. and its most recent arrival into Canada, we at Row Three would like to highlight some of the great choices available at the press of a button.

 


 

Annie (John Huston)

One of the very first films I remember my parents taking me too. And wow does it still hold up! Great song and dance numbers, anti-communism subtexts, the political divide, the great depression, cute kids, a stellar Broadway cast and the 7-UP guy using the force. If Burnett and Finney weren’t nominated for an Oscar that year, they damn well should’ve! Sheer brilliance. Family films just aren’t made this way anymore perhaps most certified by an extended sequence with the joy of going to the movies. It’s exciting, funny and if nothing else the thirties had style. Relive this near masterpiece now while it’s available at the click of a button.
-ANDREW
 

it! (USA)

 


 

Community – Season 1 (Dan Harmon)

Enough people had told me to watch Community that I finally caved and took a look. Within the first five minutes of the first episode I laughed so hard I had to pause for fear of missing the next joke. The show follows a motley crew of characters trying to perpetually study for Spanish class in an undignified community college. As ensembles go, this has got to be the best, with the stand-outs for me being Joe McHale as Jeff, the so-called leader of the group (who is as close to Adam Scott in acting style as you can get), Chevy Chase as Pierce, the elderly student trying desperately to seem cool, and of course, Danny Pudi as Abed, the insanely meta oddball who insists they are all in a sitcom. Meshing a lot of the great aspects of Party Down and Freaks and Geeks, Community is relentlessly funny (sometimes veering a bit too far into non-sequitur comedy for my taste but usually tempered with a meta-understanding that apparently builds upon the Abed character in future episodes). As someone who has attended community college I see a lot of truth in this otherwise go-for-broke oneupmanship of half-hour sitcom comedies. I have only seen the first 15 episodes so far, but of these, the consistency of quality remains incredibly high. Try the first episode, this is quality straight out of the gate.
-MIKE
 

it! (CANADA)

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Sunday Bookmarks: March 14-20

 

  • Why see ‘Don’t Look Now’?
    Coming to BluRay and rep screenings in the UK: “In hindsight, ‘Don’t Look Now’ is the perfect mixture of Roeg’s abilities as a teller of mysterious stories and as one of the most accomplished cinematic stylists ever to peep through a viewfinder. The film smashes up chronology and pieces it back together in a deviously strange order, so we get constant hints and suggestions of dark events to come. Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie are utterly convincing as the central couple who flee to Venice to retain a focus on their messed-up lives.”
  • Notes on Charlie Sheen and the End of Empire
    “No, what this moment is about is Charlie Sheen solo. It’s about a well-earned mid-life crisis played out on Sheen’s Korner instead of in a life coach’s office somewhere in Burbank. The mid-life crisis is the moment in a man’s life when you realize you can’t (won’t) maintain the pose that you thought was required of you any longer—you’re older and you have a different view of life and this is when the bitterness and acceptance blooms. Tom Cruise had a similar meltdown at the same age in the summer of 2005, but his was more politely manufactured (and, of course, he was never known as an addict). Cruise had his breakdown while smiling and he couldn’t get loose, he couldn’t be natural about it. He’s always essentially been the good boy who can’t say “Fuck You” the way Sheen can.”
  • An Interview with Greta Gerwig at SxSW
    Greta Gerwig is no stranger to SXSW. Her new film, “The Dish & the Spoon,” marks the sixth time she has had a movie in the festival in an film career that has stretched the same number of years. This new film, directed by Alison Bagnall, about a woman and a young man (Olly Alexander) who bond during a tumultuous time in their lives. Ms. Gerwig’s acting style, which A.O. Scott lauded for its “apparent absence of any method,” is employed in this intimate, primarily two-character study.
  • Bernardo Bertolucci has a 3D Project
    “Cult Italian film director Bernardo Bertolucci said in an interview for his 70th birthday on Wednesday that he will be making his first 3D film this year saying it was like riding on a “flying carpet” […] “I want to use 3D in a different way from what we have seen in films like ‘Avatar’ or other films characterised by special effects,” he said.”
  • Is Netflix Abandoning Its Business Model Again?
    With the production of David Fincher/Kevin Space HBO-styled TV DRAMA, It looks like a new strategy is here. In the great tradition of the network and cable game, make themselves a “must carry.” I wouldn’t be shocked to see them in the bidding for hockey or trying to make a deal to stream Major League Baseball or something like that before long. If they are going this way, no one show “airing” 13 times a year is going to keep customers paying $8 or more a month. If Netflix becomes a thrift shop, with content here and there and everywhere, the churn will get worse […] This choice, combined with the exit of Criterion and the abandonment of Red Envelope, their previously stab at original content, clearly tells us that Netflix sees no future in quality film lovers as a primary audience for the service. Fair enough. But it will be interesting to see when the cineastes get the message.”
  • Zediva – A Clever End Run Around the Movie-Streaming Gremlins
    “It lets you listen to the director’s commentary, turn on subtitles and change languages. It lets you enjoy your movie for two weeks instead of 24 hours, starting and stopping at will. It offers the 100 biggest movies for streaming on the very same day the DVD comes out. It sidesteps any meddling by the movie companies, HBO contracts and studio lawyers. And here’s the best news of all — are you sitting down on your favorite movie couch? The price is only $2 for one movie or $1 if you buy a 10-pack. There’s no signup fee, no monthly fee, no hardware to buy. Zediva’s secret is so outrageous, you may think it’s an early April Fool’s prank. But it’s no joke.”
  • Is Matthew McConaughey Really Shirtless in Every Movie?
    “Conventional wisdom likes to assume that Matthew McConaughey has taken his shirt off in every single one of his movies. True, McConaughey is not shy when it comes to going bare chested on-screen and in public, but is he really sans shirt in every one of his movies?” Yes, Movieline actually checks out each and every one of them to be sure.

 
 

You can now take a look at RowThree’s bookmarks at any time of your choosing simply by clicking the “delicious” button in the upper right of the page. It looks remarkably similar to this:

 

Review: Men Who Stare at Goats

Director: Grant Heslov
Novel: Jon Ronson
Screenplay: Peter Straughan
Producers: George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Paul Lister
Starring: George Clooney, Ewan McGregor, Jeff Bridges, Kevin Spacey, J.K. Simmons, Robert Patrick, Stephen Root, Stephen Lang
MPAA Rating: no info
Running time: 90 min.


With such an all-star cast as is on display in Men Who Stare at Goats, I had to admit a little trepidation here as this film came absolutely out of nowhere and the trailer wasn’t even released until about a week before Toronto Film Festival. “Where did this come from,” I thought. This just seems like the sort of project I should have heard about months ago. So I have to admit I wasn’t expecting much. Wow did we get just the opposite!

The basic story is that Ewan McGregor plays journalist, Bob Wilton. Bob has a heartbreak. To ease his pain he’s itching to dive right into the suck and cover the war in Iraq. But with little experience or chutzpah, just getting in country proves more difficult than he first imagined. But through a series of local interviews he learns of a secret sect of the military focusing on psychological warfare. Running with this story, he soon fortuitously joins up with Lyn Cassady (Clooney), an ex-army man that is part of this secret branch of the military. Cassady claims to have secret powers and that the military is training all manner of more super agents (with invisibility, telekinesis, levitation, etc.). With Cassady at his side, the two embark on a hilarious mission of ultra importance. Though neither we, nor Bob, ever really find out what that mission is.
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TIFF 09 Review: Men Who Stare at Goats

Director: Grant Heslov
Novel: Jon Ronson
Screenplay: Peter Straughan
Producers: George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Paul Lister
Starring: George Clooney, Ewan McGregor, Jeff Bridges, Kevin Spacey, J.K. Simmons, Robert Patrick, Stephen Root, Stephen Lang
MPAA Rating: no info
Running time: 90 min.


With such an all-star cast as is on display in Men Who Stare at Goats, I had to admit a little trepidation here as this film came absolutely out of nowhere and the trailer wasn’t even released until about a week before Toronto Film Festival. “Where did this come from,” I thought. This just seems like the sort of project I should have heard about months ago. So I have to admit I wasn’t expecting much. Wow did we get just the opposite!

The basic story is that Ewan McGregor plays journalist, Bob Wilton. Bob has a heartbreak. To ease his pain he’s itching to dive right into the suck and cover the war in Iraq. But with little experience or chutzpah, just getting in country proves more difficult than he first imagined. But through a series of local interviews he learns of a secret sect of the military focusing on psychological warfare. Running with this story, he soon fortuitously joins up with Lyn Cassady (Clooney), an ex-army man that is part of this secret branch of the military. Cassady claims to have secret powers and that the military is training all manner of more super agents (with invisibility, telekinesis, levitation, etc.). With Cassady at his side, the two embark on a hilarious mission of ultra importance. Though neither we, nor Bob, ever really find out what that mission is.
Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 129 – Boot Bombs and Boxcutters

Episode 129:
SUPER SPOILER!! edition of the Cinecast today with both Public Enemies and Duncan Jones’ Moon. Then we talk about some fun trailers recently. Thanks to Matt Gamble from Where The Long Tail Ends for keeping things spirited per usual.

The Show Notes have left the building in the short term. Bear with us.

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To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
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Bookmarks for July 6th through July 7th

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What we’ve been reading – July 6th through July 7th: