Friday One Sheet: Paterson

Paterson, New Jersey. City of waterfalls, inspiration to poet William Carlos Williams, and in a post-modern sense, to poet Jim Jarmusch. This minimal German poster for the film highlights several, but not all elements of the film, does not showcase the star, Adam driver, but rather the city and the mood of the film, contemplative, a bit blue, and a wee bit out of sorts with ones pet.

Trailer: Paterson

“A bus driver in Paterson…It is very poetic.” Says the Japanese man on a bench. This new trailer for Paterson gives you a good feel and rhythm of Jim Jarmusch’s latest slice of top shelf cinema, without even scratching the surface of all the great treasures buried in the film. Adam Driver drives a bus, writes poetry on his breaks, walks his wife’s dog, and has a pint at the local watering hole. That’s it. Heck, if anything this trailer over-emphasizes many of the ‘plot red-herrings’ of the narrative, because “A trailer has to be exciting, right?” No matter, if it gets butts in seats, all the better for this, one of the best films of the year.

Fun Fact: Look for the young couple from Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom making a cameo on Paterson’s bus.

Enjoy.

Cannes 2016 Lineup! It’s chock-a-block!

It appears to be a great year for international cinema, if the line-up for Cannes is any indication. New films from Nicolas Winding Refn, Woody Allen, Jeff Nichols, Park Chan-Wook, Steven Spielberg, Andrea Arnold, Ken Loach, Pedro Almodovar, Olivier Assayas, Hirokazu Kore-Eda, Shane Black, Jim Jarmusch, Paul Verhoeven, The Dardennes Brothers, and young canuck, Xavier Dolan. And that is just getting started.

Woody Allen’s star-dense Cafe Society will kick off the festival on May 11th with the following films playing in competition.

“Toni Erdmann” (Maren Ade)
“Julieta” (Pedro Almodovar)
“American Honey” (Andrea Arnold)
“Personal Shopper” (Olivier Assayas)
“The Unknown Girl” (Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardennes)
“It’s Only The End Of The World” (Xavier Dolan)
“Slack Bay” (Bruno Dumont)
“Paterson” (Jim Jarmusch)
“Staying Vertical” (Alain Guiraudie)
“Aquarius” (Kleber Mendonça Filho)
“Mal De Pierres” (Nicole Garcia)
“I, Daniel Blake” (Ken Loach)
“Ma’ Rosa” (Brillante Mendoza)
“Bacalaureat” (Cristian Mungiu)
“Loving” (Jeff Nichols)
“The Handmaiden” (Park Chan-Wook)
“The Last Face” (Sean Penn)
“Sierra Nevada” (Cristi Puiu)
“Elle” (Paul Verhoeven)
“The Neon Demon” (Nicholas Winding Refn)

The rest of the line-up (those out-of-competition for the Golden Palm) are tucked under the seat.

Would you like to know more…?

Cinecast Episode 398 – Crying in the Darkness and Licking the Floor

Outside of the lengthy “Game of Thrones” discussion this week (which covers the last two episodes), we manage to stay pretty spoiler free, despite a main review for part of the 2015 western resurgence in Slow West. Also, Andrew hits the theater for the latest Cameron Crowe joint from Hawaii and the Brian Wilson / Beach Boys biopic, Love & Mercy. On the “television” front, Netflix and Kurt hangout for about 12 hours in the compelling mess that is “Sense8” and Andrew finds enough commuting time to follow-up with Adnan and friends in the “Undisclosed” podcast. It’s a jam packed show full of fire and Australia; yes all of it (copyright Mark Kermode).

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 

 
 

aloha-cinecastposter aloha-cinecastposter

 

Would you like to know more…?

Review: Only Lovers Left Alive

OnlyLoversLeftAlive

Detroit is the new Transylvania in Jim Jarmusch’s delightfully detached vampire reverie, Only Lovers Left Alive. The film manages to significantly build upon and outdo Neil Jordan’s recent Byzantium in terms of clawing back the genre from its more recent sparkly teen-focus. The mature tone is pregnant with the kind of disaffected slow gaze that would probably result from a century or three on this imperfect earth with its revolving social cycles. It achieves a modern-Gothic romanticism better than pop culture’s own aging vampire-queen Anne Rice ever managed in novel form or when adapted to celluloid It evokes the people exodus and urban decay of Motor City in such a transcendent fashion that it nearly renders Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s Detropia redundant. Undoubtedly, this is the white-haired director firing on all cylinders even as he is not in much of a hurry drive any sort of plot. The patience in pacing echo the lifestyles of the quasi-immortals caught up in music, art and ennui.

At first glance, some might label the movie slight due to its complete lack of concern for plotting, but any film which allows the viewer to breathe in so deeply, to revel in its dark spaces and eclectic moods is anything but. Only Lovers Left Alive is akin to listening to an exceptionally good album from end to end. The film even visually suggest this in the opening shot of the camera spinning and fading into vinyl spinning on its turntable. Jarmusch’s own band, Sqürl provides a droning, but warm and fuzzy, score that is wonderful thing in which to get lost in itself.

Would you like to know more…?

Trailer: Only Lovers Left Alive

Only Lovers Left Alive

Jim Jarmusch is at his most Jarmuschian as he envisions immortal vampires who have seen it all, traversing around urban centres of the world before settling in old Detroit, as gothic a place as one might find in America in 2013. Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston listen to rock and roll, talk science, art and cuddle in the dark before a spunky Mia Wasikowska comes along to break up the oh-so-romantic ennui. I believe it is fair to say that the trailer here captures the tone of the film pretty well, right down to the spinning record, and the jet-setting. One of the strengths about this particular take on the vampire is that it is not in any hurry to get anywhere, and that is just fine. The greek subtitles on this international trailer for the film only add to its own sense of the cosmopolitan decay.

My review of the film can be found here.

TIFF Review: Only Lovers Left Alive

OnlyLoversLeftAlive

Detroit is the new Transylvania in Jim Jarmusch’s delightfully detached vampire reverie, Only Lovers Left Alive. The film manages to significantly build upon and outdo Neil Jordan’s recent Byzantium in terms of clawing back the genre from its more recent sparkly teen-focus. The mature tone is pregnant with the kind of disaffected slow gaze that would probably result from a century or three on this imperfect earth with its revolving social cycles. It achieves a modern-Gothic romanticism better than pop culture’s own aging vampire-queen Anne Rice ever managed in novel form or when adapted to celluloid It evokes the people exodus and urban decay of Motor City in such a transcendent fashion that it nearly renders Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s Detropia redundant. Undoubtedly, this is the white-haired director firing on all cylinders even as he is not in much of a hurry drive any sort of plot. The patience in pacing echo the lifestyles of the quasi-immortals caught up in music, art and ennui.

At first glance, some might label the movie slight due to its complete lack of concern for plotting, but any film which allows the viewer to breathe in so deeply, to revel in its dark spaces and eclectic moods is anything but. Only Lovers Left Alive is akin to listening to an exceptionally good album from end to end. The film even visually suggest this in the opening shot of the camera spinning and fading into vinyl spinning on its turntable. Jarmusch’s own band, Sqürl provides a droning, but warm and fuzzy, score that is wonderful thing in which to get lost in itself.

Would you like to know more…?

First TIFF Titles Announced. Lots of Depth in here.

New films from Jonathan Glazer, Jean-Marc Vallée, Alphonso Cuaron, Richard Ayoade, Kelly Reichardt, Jim Jarmusch, Roger Mitchell, Bertrand Tavernier, Lukas Moodysson, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Don McKellar, Hirokazu Kore-Eda and Sylvain Chomet! The 2013 edition of the Toronto International Film Festival just dropped its first big wave of titles, and if you are local to Toronto or take film festival oriented vacations, and know the names of film directors from around the world, then you are probably already counting the days until the big festival of festivals begins. The big list below is the usual style of lead-off TIFF press release featuring high profile filmmakers in the Galas and Special Presentations programmes. The smaller titles of world cinema, genre films, and more experimental stuff will come in future waves, but take a close gander down below and see just how deep the line-up is already:

All Is By My Side (UK), dir John Ridley
Attila Marcel (France), dir Sylvain Chomet
Bad Words (US) dir Jason Bateman
Belle (UK), dirs Amma Asante
Adele: Chapters 1 & 2 (France), Abdellatif Kechiche
Burning Bush (Czech Republic), dir Agnieszka Holland
Can A Song Save Your Life? (US), dir John Carney
Cannibal (Spain-Romania-Russia-France), dir Manuel Martín Cuenca
Dallas Buyers Club (US), dir Jean-Marc Vallée
Devil’s Knot (US), dir Atom Egoyan
The Disappearance Of Eleanor Rigby: Him and Her (US), dir Ned Benson
Dom Hemingway (UK), dir Richard Shepard
Don Jon (US), dir Joseph Gordon-Levitt
The Double (UK), dir Richard Ayoade
Exit Marrakech (Germany), dir Caroline Link
Felony (Australia), dir Matthew Savvily
For Those Who Can Tell No Tales (Bosnia and Herzegovina) dir Jasmila Žbanić
Gloria (Chile-Spain), dir Sebastián Lelio, Chile/Spain
Going Away (France), dir Nicole Garcia
Gravity (US-UK), dir Alfonso Cuarón,
The Great Beauty (Italy), dir Paolo Sorrentino,
Half Of A (Nigeria-UK), dir Ivi Bandele
Hateship Loveship (US), dir Liza Johnson
L’intrepido (Italy), dir Gianni Amelio
Ida (Poland), dir Pawel Pawlikowski
The Invisible Woman (UK), dir Ralph Fiennes
Joe (US), dir David Gordon Green
Labor Day (US), dir Jason Reitman
Like Father, Like Son (Japan) dir Hirokazu Kore-Eda
Man Of Tai Chi (US-China), dir Keanu Reeves
Mary, Queen Of Scots (France-Switzerland), dir Thomas Imbach
Mystery Road (Australia), dir Ivan Sen
Night Moves (US), dir Kelly Reichardt
Omar (Palestine), dir Hany Abu-Assad
One Chance (US), dir David Frankel
Only Lovers Left Alive (US), dir Jim Jarmusch
The Past (France-Italy), dir Asghar Farhadi
Philomena (UK), dir Stephen Frears
Pioneer (Norway), dir Erik Skjoldbjærg
Quai d’Orsay (France), dir Bertrand Tavernier
REAL (Japan), dir Kiyoshi Kurasawa
Starred Up (UK), dir David Mackenzie
Those Happy Years (Italy), dir Daniele Luchetti
Tracks (UK, Australia), dir John Curran
Under The Skin (US-UK), dir Jonathan Glazer
Violette (France/Belgium), dir Martin Provost
Visitors (US) dir Godfrey Reggio
Walesa. Man Of Hope (Poland), dir Andrzej Wajda
We Are The Best! (Sweden), dir Lukas Moodysson
Le Weekend (UK), dir Roger Michell
You Are Here (US), dir Matthew Weiner
Young and Beautiful (France-Belgium), dir Francois Ozon
The Art Of The Steal (Canada) dir Jonathan Sobol
August: Osage County (US), dir John Wells
Cold Eyes (South Korea), dirs Cho Ui-seok and Kim Byung-seo
The Grand Seduction (Canada), dir Don McKellar
Kill Your Darlings (US), dir John Krokidas
The Love Punch (France), dir Joel Hopkins
The Lunchbox (India-France-Germany), dir Ritesh Batra
The Railway Man (Australia-UK), dir Jonathan Teplitzky
The Right Kind Of Wrong (Canada) dir Jeremiah Chechik
Rush (UK-Germany), dir Ron Howard
Shuddh Desi Romance (India), dir Maneesh Sharma
Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon (US), dir Mike Myers

Cannes 2013 Review Roundup Part 2

Well, the festival is over, the prizes have been given out and we can all go home and get some sleep. For those of you that haven’t found out already, here are the main competition winners:

The Palme D’Or: Blue is the Warmest Colour (a.k.a. La Vie d’Adele – Chapitre 1 & 2) by Abdellatif Kechiche (France)
The Grand Prix: Inside Llewyn Davis by Ethan and Joel Coen (U.S.)
The Jury Prize: Like Father, Like Son (a.k.a. Soshite Chichi Ni Naru) by Kore-Eda Hirokazu (Japan)
Best Director: Amat Escalante (Mexico) for Heli
Best Screenplay: A Touch of Sin (a.k.a. Tian Zhu Ding) by Jia Zhangke (China)
Best Actor: Bruce Dern in Nebraska
Best Actress: Bérénice Bejo in The Past (a.k.a. Le Passé)
The Camera D’Or (for first feature): Ilo Ilo by Anthony Chen (Singapore)

On Sunday they replayed all of the main competition films for standard badge-holders so I managed to cram in another 5 of the ‘big’ films. I tried to catch Polanski’s Venus in Furs too, but it was full by the time I arrived. Anyway, here are my thoughts on the last handful of films I saw at Cannes in 2013. Would you like to know more…?

Hit or Miss: Jim Jarmusch

[This is the first in what is to be an ongoing series of posts demarcating the highlight and lowlight of a particular theme, body of work, or significant category of film. Feel free to offer alternative suggestions in the comment section]

HIT: Mystery Train
 
 

Yokohama Mystery Train

Mystery Train, more so than the meta-mash-up, Limits of Control, best captures the Jarmuschian universe. The movie is unmistakably auteur, the kitsch set design, lived-in locations, chaptering of short segments intersecting around a common motif, and, most importantly, the hipster deadpan that hangs drolly like a cigarette from Jun’s permanent scowl. Here we see Memphis as a decaying memorial to the spirit of all things Elvis, with three groups of characters finding refuge in a low-rate hotel night clerked by none other than Screamin’ Jay Hawkins. Like Tarantino’s films, Mystery Train revels in creating a cinematic universe with its Memphis, every billboard, and poster carefully alluding to its own alternate reality. This in addition to the use of three stories told out of sequence and choice pop culture references peppering the script make Mystery Train a clear precursor, if not inspiration for, Pulp Fiction (the similarities are almost unmissable). With the exception maybe of Limits of Control, Mystery Train is Jarmusch’s most visually sumptuous outing, the neon Memphis nights bursting with colour (not to mention Hawkins’ fire engine red suit). The choice of actors is also top-notch, the comedic beats hit more from expression than dialogue, particularly with the ‘Far From Yokohama’ segment where the actors playing Jun and Mitsuko are damn near vaudevillian in their delivery. Mystery Train is the perfect culmination of all that is great in Jarmusch’s work; if an auteur is always redoing the same film, this is where he nails it.

Would you like to know more…?

Review: The Limits of Control

Jarmusch Limits of Control

Director: Jim Jarmusch (Stranger Than Paradise, Dead Man, Broken Flowers, Coffee and Cigarettes)
Writers: Jim Jarmusch
Starring: Isaach De Bankolé, Tilda Swinton, Bill Murray, John Hurt, Gael García Bernal
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 116 min.


In my experience, the greatest films tend to be those I didn’t see coming, and in many of these cases only after a second or third viewing do they begin to resonate in my bones. They exist on the periphery of what I know or think I know, they taunt me with revelations that I maybe never considered or experienced before. I believe Jim Jarmusch’s The Limits of Control could be one of these films, a masterpiece until proven otherwise. I remain dazzled by things I cannot account for, and while this could be a sort of self-delusion or con of art, I think something big happened here.

The Limits of Control operates on the premise of show not tell, and even though there are scenes where characters divulge exposition, nothing is quite what it appears to be. The film is a richly layered frenzy of semiotic images and linguistic turns of phrase that pose more than enact a narrative and in their flirtations with the audience they take us deeper down the rabbit hole. To call this meta would be an understatement, and while it is definitely swimming in the ether of Lynch’s Mulholland Dr, its less about mood and psychology so much as it is about ideas, and in this respect probably owes more of its lineage to the works of Godard.

Jarmusch Limits of Control

In the representational component of this abstract painting we encounter a Lone Man (played stoically by Isaach De Bankolé) who intermittently drinks espressos, passes secret messages between contacts, takes in the sights and sounds of Spain, and refrains from having sex with a naked brunette. Espionage intrigue is clearly a veneer in this film, as is virtually everything in frame at every moment. While the film flirts with the dreadfully pedantic cipher-cinema of Godard’s Alphaville, Jarmusch allows his images to breathe in that Jarmuschian way; less about the need of deciphering to understand the loaded images, The Limits of Control requires you to perhaps sense in a more immanent way the essence of the ideas its collage effect serves. Would you like to know more…?