Teaser: Dead Men Tell No Tales

Joachim Rønning, the Norwegian director of Kon-Tiki and Max Manus has been brought in to make another Pirates of The Caribbean movie for Disney, of which you can find the teaser trailer below. As noted in the recent episode of Mamo!, there is no actual Johnny Depp in the trailer, even though the actor remains top billed in the venerable franchise. Instead you are treated to a black blood spewing Javier Bardem, monologue-ing effectively to a very good Orlando Bloom look-alike.

Cinecast Episode 326 – Functionally Retarded, Yet Infectious

As it turns out, we discover as a very welcome surprise that this is Kurt and Andrew’s 300th episode together. So there’s reason enough to celebrate here. Kinda. But if you’re more into movies rather than nostalgia and landmarks, there’s plenty to get into with this episode. We have five, count ’em five, theatrical reviews to get to as well as our respective festival titles and experiences to mention. All of this spirals into a very important homework assignment for the week. Matt Gamble comes aboard to talk about Ridley Scott’s meandering. We get into all manner of awesome, including Robert Redford’s double takes, Polanski spelling it out, Elijah Wood is perpetually twelve years old and Judd Apatow’s version of a Richard Linklater film. All of this and a helluva lot more in another mega-episode that spans nearly four hours.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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Trailer: Sail with Ridley Scott’s Counselor

One expects no less than handsome marketing and presentation from director Ridley Scott. And what an effective use of Awoldnation’s super-simple “Sail” to establish an editing rhythm of the piece. Great character beats and strange hair (a mark of potential film excellence if Skyfall and No Country For Old Men have anything to say about it) on Javier Bardem When the first trailers and teasers started appearing for his film based on a Cormac McCarthy original screenplay, The Counselor, it certainly warmed the cockles of my heart to see him tackle a noir-ish little thriller which such an A-list cast.

Cinecast Episode 280 – Skypefall

Well it doesn’t happen until the very end, but you know eventually there’s going to be warfare. This time the smackdown is over a non-existent remake. Who knew? Anyway, before the fireworks is a pretty good SPOILER review of 007’s latest adventure in Skyfall. An impressive homework turnout this week in which races are discussed – very few with cars surprisingly. And then it’s on to The patented Watch List, in which the boys get into more James Bond titles, some “un-Spielbergian” releases, the latest news from the Adam Sandler front, mishandled ghosts and very early Joseph Gordon-Levitt love – spiraling downwards into our own version of a “versus” segment: Kathleen Turner vs. Anne Hathaway. All of this and so much more to love…kinda, here on episode 280. Enjoy!

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Mamo #279: From the Skyfall Down

SKYFALL! We’re joined by special guest star Fingerless Hobie / Demetre Eliopoulos, straight out of an IMAX screening of the fiftieth anniversary Bond spectacular. Grab your martini and have a seat at our table!

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TIFF 2012 Review: To the Wonder

“Pourqoi pas Toujours?” Is the question on the mind of Terrence Malick in his latest emotive cinematic meditation. The french phrase which translates to “Why not always?” could have easily been an alternate title for the film. Here the elusive auteur is less overtly concerned with the connections between the personal and the infinite (as he was in Tree of Life) even as one should consider To The Wonder a companion film if only because it is shot and constructed in nearly the same manner. There may even be a shot or two from the previous film used here. Gone, however, is the consideration of fathers & sons and the complex divide between them, or notions of boys coming of age. Here the film suggest that each *age* in a persons life, each chapter, however, where ever, you wish to draw the dividing lines is worthy of no regrets (as Ms. Piaf might sing.) Remaining is the invitation to cherish those discrete packages of time that inevitably, come to an end. Now like all Malick films, you can either find that a trite subject to make a film, but equally like all of the directors work, he is unabashedly earnest about it.

He is perhaps telling us to simply enjoy the miracle that is life, even when it treats you badly. This is examined in relationships both past and present, family, faith and even the current environmental state of the planet. At one point, I even felt that there was some Antonioni geography-is-a-reflection-of-state-of-mind being channeled in the divide between urban Paris and the wide open midwest american suburbs; although perhaps not so and probably not worth considering further. What the director has kept is the earthy and ethereal treatment of redheads, here former 007 beauty Olga Kurylenko, who like Jessica Chastain before her gets the chance to both soar (note the directors particular fascination with women twirling in summer dresses) and suffer in the form of spiritual paralysis. (the shadowy yin to the free-spirited yang) over the course of the films run-time. Like much of the auteur directors post-Days of Heaven work, you will get out of the film what you bring into it. It will either amplify your feelings or tweak them in one direction or another. Emmanuel Lubezki’s cinematography is of course impeccable and glorious, even with the inclusion of some smart-phone and Skype video into the proceedings.

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Terrence Malick’s “To The Wonder” gets an R rating

Formerly the “Untitled Terrence Malick Project” starring Ben Affleck, Rachel McAdams, Rachel Weisz, Javier Bardem, Olga Kurylenko, Barry Pepper, Michael Sheen and Amanda Peet, the film got both its title, To The Wonder, and its MPAA rating, “R” today. Strange title, it feels like directions to Malick’s awesome yet often obtuse filmmaking style (“This way to the wonder folks! Wonder? Wonder!”) It’s certainly not at Cannes, and who knows if it will come out in 2012, 2013 or whenever. Just passing this along, because, well … Terrence Malick.

Oh, in cause you were curious, the R was doled out for nudity.

“To The Wonder is a romantic drama centered on a man who reconnects with a woman from his hometown after his marriage to a European woman falls apart.”

More Malick Already on the Way

The most anticipated film of the year, Terry Malick’s Tree of Life hasn’t even seen the dark of theaters yet and already we’re getting some bits from his next film; an as of yet untitled romance starring Rachel McAdams and Ben Affleck. Apparently shooting concluded last week and we’re looking forward to a 2012 release (yeah, I’ll believe that when I see it).

If Affleck / McAdams doesn’t really turn your crank, here’s the rest of the cast which may excite you: Rachel Weisz, Olga Kurylenko, Javier Bardem and Barry Pepper Nothing else really to report as details, per usual on a Malick film, are pretty much under wraps. Still, excitement ensues. Check out the first released (Days of Heaven-esque) image of the film below.

 

Cinecast Episode 202 – Obviously You’re Not a Golfer

 

It is a cornucopia, a smörgåsbord, a veritable potpourri of cinema, as the Cinecast regulars get together with nothing on the agenda other than to talk about what they have watched, in the cinema, on the DVD and streamed from the internet or (in an exciting technology development, from the Computer Hard Drive.) Andrew continues to dig into the Foreign Language Nominees with Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Biutiful. Kurt comes at Oscar a different way with the new documentary on the man with the midas touch when it comes to little gold men, Harvey Weinstein. And Gamble talks best animated film of 2011 with a preview of the flat out awesome Gore Verbinski/Nickelodeon/Industrial-Light-And-Magic Johnny Depp western, Rango. From there, we go from the occult, to Penelope Cruz DTV failures, to two vastly different takes time travel from the 1980s to Chinese shopping malls. Then it is onto Romans wandering about Scotland, Aussie crime dynasties and suburban teenage prostitution rings! It is all a part of your complete breakfast.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

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Official Trailer for Iñárritu’s “Biutiful”

Holy Hannah is this a beautiful looking trailer. It doesn’t really give us much to go on in terms of plot or characterization, but you can find all of that pretty easily by doing a little web work. I know this was a pretty big hit at TIFF last month and if this trailer coupled with Iñárritu’s past efforts are any indication, I think we’re in for a real treat in Biutiful.

The film follows Uxbal (Bardem), an underworld figure and devoted single dad, through his attempts to reconcile with a past love and secure a future for his children as his own death draws near. Biutiful represents something of a departure for Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, even as it confirms the pervasive bleakness of his worldview. Less invested in themes of fate and convergence than his previous work, this gritty, slow-burning melodrama nonetheless offers a very long descent into a private purgatory, and its scant emotional rewards can’t shake off the sense of a prodigiously gifted filmmaker stuck in a grim rut.

 
 

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