Cinecast Episode 459 – De-Scarify

Some differences of opinions on this week’s episode. Because Gamble is not here, we are civil about it and it never comes to blows – sorry about that. We might try to step things up a notch on the tension scale for future episodes, but perhaps we will stay in casual discussion mode for a while. At any rate, this week we are reviewing Benna Fleck, Anna Kendrick, J.K. Simmons, et. al. in Gavin O’Connor’s The Accountant. Next up, we pre-cover a little bit of Toronto After Dark Film Festival with their Friday screening of The Lure.

For The Watch List, both of the guys look back a month or two at previous 2016 releases. Kurt is hopeful that there is an extended version of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children out there somewhere to enjoy, while Andrew is kind of wishing that Nerve never existed in the first place. As a quick side tangent, Kurt relished Thirteen Days after last week’s discussion. Andrew secretly watched most of it again too.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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Cinecast Episode 368 – Marriage as an Extreme Sport

Andrew and Kurt are back together. It’s been rocky these past 30 days, but they’ve decided to give their relationship another go. We’ll be easing back into it – we don’t want to rush anything. So we’re foregoing The 1984 Project this week and keeping The Watch List light and breezy. As it has more or less been David Fincher week across the webs, Kurt takes our lengthy discussion on GONE GIRL and continues the conversation with ZODIAC and SE7EN. Andrew goes back further in time to a galaxy far, far away and re-evaluates George Lucas’ masterpieces also known as Episodes I, II & III. We’ll be back next week with a full throttle show that will include a lengthier watch list, The Karate Kid and at least two theatricals.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 
 

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Review: Gone Girl

Gone-Girl

Marriage as hell is a common enough theme in the movies, and Gone Girl is whip-smart, provocative, and divorced from reality in all the right ways.

David Fincher’s Gone Girl is both a career retrospective of his common themes: Killers, geniuses, social hackers, institutions as head-space (here wedlock), and cat-and-mouse gamesmanship. At one point a character comments on the name of Nick Dunne’s bar: “The Bar,” as amusingly meta. The casting of Affleck himself, an almost-A-list actor who has gone through the love-hate tabloid cycle with his relationships and his movies, is perfect. Nick Dunne goes through a similar cycle as the movie moves through its meticulous contortions. At times it feels like Fincher was not satisfied enough with balance of realism and momentum in The Game, and felt the need to remake it as spousal oneupmanship. Gone Girl is a dark delight if you have a certain mindset.
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Trailer: Gone Girl

If you want a lesson in rhythm in how to cut a preview, (and do recall the Coen’s A Serious Man teaser), consider the full trailer for David Fincher’s Gone Girl the way to do it with exposition and dialogue. The way that things are culminating along several tracks and all come to a head in the final moment of the teaser is, well, an art unto itself. Not so much a lesson in empathy, but more of a tense build-up of suspicion in just over two minutes.

Adapted from the novel by Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl exposes the secrets at the heart of a marriage and does so on a massively public stage. Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) reports that his wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), has gone missing on their wedding anniversary. Under pressure from the police and a growing media frenzy, Nick’s portrait of a blissful union begins to crumble. Soon his lies, deceits and visible lack of empathy have everyone asking the same dark question.

Oh, and there is a fair bit of Neil Patrick Harris in there, which is never a bad thing.

Trailer: Gone Girl

David Fincher is back after a hiatus with TV (the first few episodes on House of Cards Season 1) with Gone Girl, the movie adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s novel of the same name. The film stars Ben Affleck as a man who becomes the prime suspect in a murder when his wife vanishes. The signature urine-yellow lighting, dwarfing the characters in architecture and media spaces are all present, but I am not alone in finding the musical choice here to undermine instead of underscore the mood. Your mileage may vary. You know my bum is in a cinema seat the moment this comes out, when the director finds himself in that Zodiac kind of mood.

Further question, is the final shot of the trailer a spoiler, or a red herring? I’ve not read the book, but it seems a daring thing to do and an easy thing to play coy with the non-book readers. Please consider the question rhetorical and withhold spoilers.

Review: To The Wonder

“Pourqoi pas Toujours?” Is the question on the mind of Terrence Malick in his latest emotive cinematic meditation. The french phrase which translates to “Why not always?” could have easily been an alternate title for the film. Here the elusive auteur is less overtly concerned with the connections between the personal and the infinite (as he was in Tree of Life.) Yet one could consider To The Wonder a companion film, if only because it is shot and constructed in nearly the same manner – there may even be a shot or two from the previous film used here. Gone, however, is the consideration of fathers & sons and the complex divide between them, or notions of boys coming of age. Here the film suggest that each *age* in a persons life, each chapter, however, where ever, you wish to draw the dividing lines is worthy of no regrets (as Ms. Piaf might sing.) Remaining is the invitation to cherish those discrete packages of time that inevitably, come to an end. Now like all Malick films, you can either find that a trite subject to make a film, but equally like all of the directors work, he is unabashedly earnest about it.

He is perhaps telling us to simply enjoy the miracle that is life, even when it treats you badly. This is examined in relationships both past and present, family, faith and even the current environmental state of the planet. At one point, I even felt that there was some Antonioni geography-is-a-reflection-of-state-of-mind being channeled in the divide between urban Paris and the midwest american suburbs. What the director has kept is the earthy and ethereal treatment of redheads, here former 007 beauty Olga Kurylenko, who like Jessica Chastain before her, gets the chance to both soar and suffer (the shadowy yin to the free-spirited yang) over the course of the films run-time. Many have noted the directors particular fascination with women twirling in summer dresses. Like much of the director’s post-Days of Heaven work, what you will get out of the film depends on whatever you bring into it. To The Wonder will either evoke certain feelings or tweak them in one direction or another.

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Cinecast Episode 295 – I Wouldn’t Wear That. Even in the Future!

This week sees a return to form with all sorts of negativity and disagreement. But [in best DeForest Kelley voice] for God sake man, it’s Anne Hathaway. She’s worth fighting for! Outside of that little tussle, Sean Kelly from SKonMovies.com joins in on the discussion with a bit more of a unique Oscar experience having seen the whole thing in a packed theater. For the majority of this Cinecast it is a look back at Sunday nights Hollywood back-patting at the Academy Awards. We talk about it all: from winners to losers to hosting to gowns (OK, not really) to stage direction to orchestration. Look no further; it’s all in here. From there we venture into the Watch List with Kurt proving Matt Gamble’s prognostication mostly correct with a viewing of Margaret. We grind the axe a bit more (though less enthusiastically) about modern biblical epics while Sean looks at a couple of Oscar-nominated documentaries and Andrew continues his Star Treking.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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Cinecast Episode 277 – He’d Pass a Polygraph But He Ain’t Innocent

In which Andrew and Kurt Argo fuck ourselves trying to get at the pleasures and the frustrations of Benna-fleck’s latest film. We grade homework in the middle (lots of good choices in there). Then we encounter the same set of frustrations and pleasures in counting up the Seven Psychopaths in Martin McDonagh’s latest offbeat violent comedy. The Watchlist is mainly Kurt as he digs through a diverse trio of films (Bernie, Watchmen, The Living Daylights) before waxing rather prosaically (sorry folks) on the great George Carlin. We have a fun time chatting Joss Whedon’s “Firefly” to close out the show.

Thanks to Nat Almirall for this week’s poster promo sitting to the right. Yeah! (sorry, we had to censor it. Non-censored version can be found HERE.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 

 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_12/episode_277.mp3

Full show notes are under the seats…
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