Cinecast Episode 455 – The Reitman Side of the Line

Right from the outset we have to apologize for the sometimes dodgy sound problems. The actual quality of the sound is pretty good… when it’s there. Due to the unco___s of the north woods, some of our discussion ____ and go. Much like this week’s DePalma _____ film, you’ll _____ fill in some of the blanks on _____ own. Speaking of that, for our (nearly) final DePalma retrospective review, we hit up his most recent film from 2012 starring Noomi Rapace and Naomi Watts entitled simply, Passion. It encapsulates much of what DePalma does so well in a tight, 90-minute “not-so-erotic” thriller. Next up, we found that we have our very own film maker here in the third row. David Brook is editor on a UK based film that he’s been warning us for months would eventually come across our desks. And now that it’s finally here, we’re so happy that it did! Powerhouse performances alongside competent direction and story telling revitalize the faux-documentary sub genre. Have a listen. Lastly, as if there wasn’t enough talk of pedophilia in this show, Andrew tackles a couple films that deal with the issue in very different ways… and in extreme variances of success. Kurt has a couple of TIFF pre-screens that the embargo hammer keeps us from discussion too much, but it rounds out a pretty nice Watch List for this week. We’ll see you all again post-TIFF!

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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Trailer: Andrea Arnold’s American Honey

American Honey

I like the word “Youthquake” that critic Owen Gleiberman applied to the film when he caught it at Cannes this year. American Honey gives the vibe of what you would get if Spring Breakers was directed by a Brit instead of an American. That’s my two cents, but don’t let me oversimplify, there is some incredible energy, cinematography, intimacy and overall film-making going on at work here. I can’t wait to see the latest film from the director of Fish Tank and Red Road. In fact, I’m due for a full Andrea Arnold marathon pretty soon.

Review: Fish Tank

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Director: Andrea Arnold (Red Road)
Screenplay: Andrea Arnold
Producers: Kees Kasander, Nick Laws
Starring: Katie Jarvis, Michael Fassbinder, Kierston Wareing, Rebecca Griffiths, Harry Treadway, Sydney Mary Nash
Year: 2009
Country: United Kingdom
Running time: 124min.

 

Three years ago, Andrea Arnold burst onto the scene with her first feature Red Road, a slowly-paced but incredibly rewarding thriller set at the edges of Britain’s working class. She has outdone herself with Fish Tank, in which she continues to find inspiration from the working class, this time focusing on teenaged Mia, struggling with school and a shrill, messy home life, keeping her head afloat only through her enjoyment of dance and possibly her relationship with an older man. If this sounds like the premise of a sappy, inspirational coming of age story, trust me, it doesn’t play like one. What I said above is basically the synopsis that appears everywhere for the film, and though it approximates what happens in the film, it’s wholly inadequate to describe it.

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Andrea Arnold Tackles Doomed Romance

Andrea ArnoldAndrea Arnold is one of the most well respected, up-and-coming female directors of the past few years and for good reason. Though Red Road still alludes me, having seen Fish Tank I can’t help but think it too is nothing short of a masterpiece. But we’re not here to muse over how outstanding her career is shaping up to be but rather to share some news which frankly, have me a little surprised.

Arnold has built a reputation for herself by telling stories of strong, female protagonists so it may not come as too much of a shocker that she’s been hired to adapt Emily Brontë’s “Wuthering Heights.” For those who may not have read the classic it’s the tragic love story (many argue it’s actually a tale of revenge) which follows the life of Heathcliff, a mysterious gypsy-like person, from childhood to his death in his late thirties. Heathcliff rises in his adopted family and then is reduced to the status of a servant, running away when Cathy Earnshaw, the young woman he loves decides to marry another. He returns later, rich and educated and sets about gaining his revenge on the two families that he believed ruined his life.

It’s a rough book, one I really disliked the first time I read it but I can see why it would be appealing to Arnold. It’s a difficult love story which, at its very center, focuses on something at the core of both of her films: class divide. I’m a little disappointed to discover that Arnold isn’t adapting the novel herself but rather taking on a script written by Olivia Hetreed. Either way this is starting to shape into a not-to-be-missed period romance and knowing Arnold, one that doesn’t rest solely on its good looks but which will also provide more than a few uncomfortable moments.

AFI Fest 2009: Fish Tank

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Director: Andrea Arnold (Red Road)
Screenplay: Andrea Arnold
Producers: Kees Kasander, Nick Laws
Starring: Katie Jarvis, Michael Fassbinder, Kierston Wareing, Rebecca Griffiths, Harry Treadway, Sydney Mary Nash
Year: 2009
Country: United Kingdom
Running time: 124min.

 

Three years ago, Andrea Arnold burst onto the scene with her first feature Red Road, a slowly-paced but incredibly rewarding thriller set at the edges of Britain’s working class. She has outdone herself with Fish Tank, in which she continues to find inspiration from the working class, this time focusing on teenaged Mia, struggling with school and a shrill, messy home life, keeping her head afloat only through her enjoyment of dance and possibly her relationship with an older man. If this sounds like the premise of a sappy, inspirational coming of age story, trust me, it doesn’t play like one. What I said above is basically the synopsis that appears everywhere for the film, and though it approximates what happens in the film, it’s wholly inadequate to describe it.

Would you like to know more…?

Trailer for Cannes Winning Fish Tank

I recall some excitement around these parts at the announcement that Andrea Arnold was premiering her new film, Fish Tank, at Cannes. Not only was the film well received, it walked away with the Cannes Jury Prize. I was already curious about the film which stars new comer Katie Jarvis as Mia, a 15 year-old whose life is takes a drastic change when her mother brings home a new boyfriend (played by the brilliant Michael Fassbender – an actor who is quickly rising up my must watch ranks), but after seeing this trailer, I’m thinking I need to run out and find Arnold’s Red Road.

Not only is this trailer gorgeous but it suggests a film I’m going to love; a story about real people in difficult situations.

IFC has picked up the film for release in the US, likely sometime in 2010, but Fish Tank opens in the UK on September 11th. Lucky bums.

Big kudos to In Contention for unearthing the trailer.