MSPIFF 2015 Quick Thoughts: In Order of Disappearance


Stellan Starsgard stars in In Order of Disappearance, an amusing Norwegian gangster tale, written by Kip Fupz Aakeson and directed by Hans Petter Moland. This is the fourth successful collaboration between the director and the actor (Zero Kelvin, Aberdeen, A Somewhat Gentle Man – this last one also written by Aakeson), but only this time it’s Pål Sverre Hagen as the eccentrically neat Mafia boss, who becomes one of the best motives to watch this flick.

Set in Norway, the film opens with the exemplary Nils (Starsgard), a respected Dane who owns a company that provides snow removal services, proudly preparing himself to be awarded the Norwegian ‘Citizen of the Year’ prize. In the same breath, his son Ingvar, employee in a small airfield, is mistakenly kidnapped and forced into a van by two thugs, and then killed with an induced overdose. Unconvinced that his son was a drug addict, the modest Nils leaves the gentleness behind and becomes a merciless hitman, when he finds the gang responsible for his pain. One by one, he starts to eliminate the members of the gang as he tracks them down, but the main goal is to reach the inaccessible mad header, Greven (Hagen), a ruthless man whose only torment is the mother of his bullied son. Soon, Nils realizes that the best to get to him might be through the latter. His successive executions also trigger a gangster war between the local mob and the Serbs with whom they had an agreement to share the airfield for illicit businesses.

Death is the word of order here; you will find so many that will be hard to count them all. Sometimes the film seems to get out of track, but the sarcastic humor (have you heard about Norwegian prisons?) and Greven’s immaculate figure, keep holding out the enjoyable levels.

 

MSPIFF 2015 Review: Clouds of Sils Maria

 


 

The eponymous image of Clouds of Sils Maria features a heavenly mist snaking its way through mountain peaks like a river, the rocks frozen in time, immutable, the clouds in perpetual motion. It is shown as shot for Olivier Assayas 2014, and the characters in the film at one point watch the 1924 Arnold Fank silent, black and white short documentary The Cloud Phenomena of Maloja. The technology and aesthetics have changed, but filmmaking keeps on rumbling chaotically along as the images captured become fixed and un-aging objects. 

No matter how many films Assayas makes, he cannot help himself from being a film critic. As with many of the auteur directors of the French New Wave a generation or more before him, he wrote for Cahiers Du Cinema before becoming a hot-shot young director. Throughout his career he has often made films that examine the business, chaos and soul of filmmaking, in France and abroad. Irma Vep had New Wave icon Jean Pierre Leaud playing an addled director who casts Maggie Cheung out the Hong Kong action cinema of Johnnie To and Jackie Chan and dropped her onto a dysfunctional Parisian film set to shoot an avant-garde remake of iconic french serial Les Vampires and Demon Lover wrapped a tangled corporate thriller around the global video and web distribution rights of anime tentacle pornography. 

Regardless of what subjects the director tackles, what is interesting about his cinema is that he has always favored actors and performances to allow his ideas to flow out onto the screen over cinematography and editing. His films breathe.

Lately, Assayas has been pre-occupied with age and youth, and has left behind, mostly, any genre trappings to make films about the passage of time and how it changes people. In Clouds of Sils Maria, he has Juliette Binoche playing a fictional version of herself named Maria Enders. An actress at a point in her career where she is an international movie star who did a stint in Hollywood blockbusters before returning to the European art house and stage. A young director asks her to appear in his revival of the play that made her famous, only this time she will be playing the broken-down wealthy businesswoman part instead of the aggressive and domineering young personal assistant who sexually dominates her boss and the stage. The play in the film bears remarkable similarity to Alain Corneau’s final film, Love Crime (which was recently remade by Brian DePalma as Passion).

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TIFF 2014 Review: Clouds of Sils Maria

 


The eponymous image of Clouds of Sils Maria features a heavenly mist snaking its way through mountain peaks like a river, the rocks frozen in time, immutable, the clouds in perpetual motion. It is shown as shot for Olivier Assayas 2014, and the characters in the film at one point watch the 1924 Arnold Fank silent, black and white short documentary The Cloud Phenomena of Maloja. The technology and aesthetics have changed, but filmmaking keeps on rumbling chaotically along as the images captured become fixed and un-aging objects. 

No matter how many films Assayas makes, he cannot help himself from being a film critic. As with many of the auteur directors of the French New Wave a generation or more before him, he wrote for Cahiers Du Cinema before becoming a hot-shot young director. Throughout his career he has often made films that examine the business, chaos and soul of filmmaking, in France and abroad. Irma Vep had New Wave icon Jean Pierre Leaud playing an addled director who casts Maggie Cheung out the Hong Kong action cinema of Johnnie To and Jackie Chan and dropped her onto a dysfunctional Parisian film set to shoot an avant-garde remake of iconic french serial Les Vampires and Demon Lover wrapped a tangled corporate thriller around the global video and web distribution rights of anime tentacle pornography. 

Regardless of what subjects the director tackles, what is interesting about his cinema is that he has always favoured actors and performances to allow his ideas to flow out onto he screen over cinematography and editing. His films breathe.

Lately, Assayas has been pre-occupied with age and youth, and has left behind, mostly, any genre trappings to make films about the passage of time and how it changes people. In Clouds of Sils Maria, he has Juliette Binoche playing a fictional version of herself named Maria Enders. An actress at a point in her career where she is an international movie who did a stint in Hollywood blockbusters before returning to the European art house and stage. A young director asks her to appear in his revival of the play that made her famous, only this time she will be playing the broken-down wealthy businesswoman part instead of the aggressive and domineering young personal assistant who sexually dominates her boss and the stage. The play in the film bears remarkable similarity to Alain Corneau’s final film, Love Crime (which was recently remade by Brian DePalma as Passion).

The middle portion of Clouds of Sils Maria, the best portion of the film, sees Enders living in isolation in the Swiss mountains, negotiating a messy divorce and occasionally going for a hike, all the while rehearsing the part with her own personal assistant. Kristen Stewart, all tangled hair and random tattoos, exuding the casual confidence and ‘above-it-all’ attitude that often gets the Twilight-actress excoriated by the media and viewing public at Awards shows, delivers a convincing, possibly career best, performance as the personal assistant, Valentine. 

The rehearsals, with Valentine line-reading the younger part while Enders blasts out the older part, starts to mimic the content of the play in subtle ways, only with many more messy complications of life (even in isolation there is Skype and Google) happening around the written-drama. Enders is trying to work out the older part, but cannot shake her desire and her memories of her own younger self. There is the suggestion sexual attraction between Binoche and Stewart (they go skinny dipping in the cold mountain waters at one point) but really it is more about the envy of unfettered freedom of youth, as opposed to the obligation and baggage of age. The same scene indulges the audiences to compare the bodies of Stewart and Binoche, even as the ladies laugh at the cold, cold water they just dove into.

An overly simple read of the film would be that the personal assistant is merely a figment of the actress’s psyche, Assays peppers the visual language of the film with many hints and visual cues:  the notably strange cellphone reception on a train in the films opening sequence; a double-exposed driving sequence when Valentine returns from a sexual tryst with a photographer and vomits on the side of the road. Clouds of Sils Maria would make a curious double-bill with Binoche’s other recent breezy self-reflective puzzle, Certified Copy. You can try to parse the details of what is going on in both films, but really you should just sit back and take in the universal human bits that make both films great. The truth however, that cinema is an object that our own perspective and viewpoint shapes what is perceived to be going on, is the brain of the film, while Juliette Binoche essaying an aging actress grappling with being the object, is the heart. 

The emotionally vulnerable actress is also obsessed with the young tabloid train-wreck who is cast in the role that made Enders famous. A small role occupied by Chloe-Grace Moretz has some fun with TMZ internet celebrity, Hollywood starlets in Europe, and some good old-time paparazzo stalking. There is even a silly, sci-fi action movie created in the film, featuring Moretz’s character that is exposition heavy to the point of hilarity. But watching the boozy  discussion of Ender’s and Valantine on how the ideas and anxieties, clumsily expressed in this sci-fi blockbuster are no different than the pop cinema 50 years ago, only with different wardrobe and trappings. This is not the heart of the film, but it is the director, ever being the critic, allowing the actors to essay his thoughts with their emotions.

FWC’s DVD Club: Away from Her

DVD ClubAround these parts, we love great film and I’m sure I’m not alone when I say I’m always on the lookout for the next best thing in Canadian film. The First Weekend Club is dedicated to sharing the best Canada has to offer and though some of the selections may not always make it to theatres across the border or around the world, there is always the DVD release. Enter the DVD Club.

Every month the First Weekend Club announces a DVD selection along with a special guest – someone involved with the film who will participate and interact with fans in the forum. We here at Row Three also love a great discussion and what could be better than chatting up a storm with the star, director or producer of that film you just watched? Yeah, I thought that might get you a bit excited.

Away From Her

This month’s selection is Sarah Polley’s Away from Her staring Gordon Pinsent, Stacey LaBerge and Julie Christie. For those who haven’t seen it, now would be the time to check out Polley’s fantastic feature directorial debut while those of us who have seen it may want to re-visit the film to part take in some discussion with this month’s guests Gordon Pinsent and Kristen Thomson.

Kaufman’s Synecdoche, New York Trailer

Synecdoche, NY Movie Still

Charlie Kaufman. I wouldn’t say the guy is crazy but it’s pretty safe to say that he things outside the box. Nothing is common when it comes from Kaufman’s mind and it’s looking like that forward thinking applies to Kaufman the director as much as it does to Kaufman the writer.

Synecdoche, New York is Kaufman’s directorial debut and according to Kurt’s quick review during the last Cinecast (and Michael’s TIFF review), it doesn’t look like an amateur stepped behind the camera something which I thought was quite apparent from the various clips that had surfaced online.

Starring a great cast which includes Philip Seymour Hoffman, Samantha Morton, Michelle Williams, Catherine Keener and Emily Watson among many others, it focuses on Hoffman’s Caden Cotard, a theater director struggling with his work, the women in his life, his new play and mortality. There’s a lot of material there to take in but by all accounts, this is a marvelous little film.

Synecdoche, New York opens in limited release, no doubt in hopes of Oscar buzz, on October 24th. And if you can’t figure out just how to say it, check out this fantastic video from Cannes featuring Variety’s Mike Jones on the pronunciation of Synecdoche.

Trailer is tucked under the seat!

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