Welcome to After the Hype on Row Three!

After_The_Hype

Hello and welcome to AFTER THE HYPE! We are Bryan Dressel and Jonathan Hardesty, two dudes based out of Los Angeles who have ditched the hype train Snowpiercer-style to talk about movies and video games on their own merit. We recently joined the RowThree family and would like to introduce ourselves all formal-like with a list of some of the defining episodes from our back catalog.

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DVD Review: Giovanni’s Island

Director: Mizuho Nishikubo
Screenplay: Shigemichi Sugita, Yoshiki Sakurai , Wendee Lee
Starring: Kota Yokoyama, Junya Taniai, Polina Ilyushenko
Producers: Kaeko Sakamoto, Eric P. Sherman
Country: Japan
Running Time: 102 min
Year: 2014
BBFC Certificate: PG


Well, I complain about there not being many anime films to review these days and two come along at once. A couple of weeks after reviewing Patema Inverted I’ve sat down to watch Giovanni’s Island, still Japanese animation, but a totally different film.

Where Patema Inverted was a disorientating sci-fi adventure, Giovanni’s Island is a moving true-life inspired drama set just after World War II. Junpei (Kota Yokoyama) and Kanta (Junya Taniai) are two young brothers who live on the small island of Shikotan, off the northernmost coast of Japan. As Japan surrender on August 15, 1945, the island becomes Soviet Union territory and the Japanese residents are forced to share the island with the Soviets who come to claim the land.

The two boys are cautious of the invaders at first, until they meet Tanya (Polina Ilyushenko), a beautiful young Russian girl whose family forces them out of their homes. Junpei falls head over heels for Tanya and the two become close friends, until a series of incidents split them apart and the Japanese are sent from the island to a mainland refugee camp. From then on, tragedy continues to strike and Junpei must stay strong beyond his years as he’s forced to look after his brother. He finds strength and solace in the story his dad used to read to them, ‘Night on the Galactic Railroad’, as the two boys recreate the wonderful fantasy world within it to maintain hope amongst the adversity they must endure.

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Blu-Ray Review: I’m All Right Jack

Director: John Boulting
Screenplay: Frank Harvey, John Boulting, Alan Hackney
Based on a Novel by: Alan Hackney
Starring: Ian Carmichael, Terry-Thomas, Peter Sellers, Richard Attenborough, Dennis Price
Producer: Roy Boulting
Country: UK
Running Time: 105 min
Year: 1959
BBFC Certificate: U


The Boulting Brothers John and Roy worked together as producer and director (often alternating the roles from film to film) to great success in their home country, the UK. 1947’s Brighton Rock may be their most famous film nowadays, but they made a name for themselves in the 50’s and 60’s with a series of satirical comedies. Perhaps the most critically successful of these, winning two BAFTA’s, was 1959’s I’m All Right Jack. Studio Canal have deemed it worthy of a sparkly new Blu-Ray release in the UK so I thought I’d check it out to see what the fuss was about.

Stanley Windrush (Ian Carmichael) is the centrepiece of this satire of working ‘modern’ Britain, which pokes fun at the trade unions in particular. Stanley’s a naïve young chap who’s finished at Oxford and wants to make a name for himself in industry. After failing miserably to secure a job by himself, he’s approached by his uncle Bertie (Dennis Price) and his old friend Sidney (Richard Attenborough). They offer him a low end manual labour position at his uncle’s missile factory so he can go in at the bottom and work his way up. Stanley’s lack of experience and desire to work more efficiently rubs his colleagues up the wrong way though and they report him to their union shop steward Fred Kite (Peter Sellers). Believing him to be a spy sent from the bosses to work out ways of getting them to work harder for the same pay, they try to get rid of him. However, Bertie and Sidney are in fact using Stanley for a secret plan, which falls perfectly in to place when he causes a strike at the factory. When surprise fame falls upon Stanley though, the strike spreads further, even sending Fred’s wife away from her ‘duties’, and chaos threatens to bring down the entire country.

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2014 List of Lists [updated 12-23]

…And here they come down the final stretch. The year ain’t quite over yet and some of us don’t even start the idea of a list until January (especially the procrastinators in the third row). Yet the heavy hitters claim they’re ready to go and the “best of” lists have already started popping up. My obsession with lists has waned in the past couple of years, but that goes out the window this time of year. I like to stay in the know with popular opinion and keep all of these lists handy. I think some of the readers here do too. But rather than publish a daily “here’s another list from Mrs. X” post, I’ll periodically (about once a week) be on the lookout for new top ten lists from critics, directors, bloggers, podcasters, the wise old owl down the street and Joe Bob Briggs. At any rate, this will be the go-to place for a constantly updated source to where you can find all of the movie top ten lists that are being spurted all over the interwebz.

I’m trying something a little bit different this year. Rather than an epic, long list with periodic updates populating the list even further, I’ll just add a new section to the list with a date and the new entries. Perhaps towards the end of January as the list releasing slows down to a halt I’ll condense them all into one long list. But for now, each time this post is re-published, you’ll be able to see all of the new entries listed by date. It may not be as easy to find a specific list right away (ctrl + f is your friend), but for those that are keeping tabs, it will be easier to see the newest updates.

If you’ve got your own list or seen a list laying around that you don’t see below and think should be included, by all means email me the link or drop it in the comments below.


TODAY’S UPDATES (12/23):
(#1 film in parentheses if applicable)
AZ Central (Boyhood)
Badass Digest  
Cinedelphia (Nightcrawler)
Cole Smithy (Mr. Turner)
Comic Book Movie (Interstellar)
Daily Review (The Babadook)
Deadshirt (Captain America: The Winter Soldier)
Dork Shelf (Boyhood)
Ebert.com (Under the Skin)
The Guardian (Under the Skin)
Hey U Guys [blogger awards] (Boyhood)
ID Film (The Tribe)
IMDb [users] (The Interview)
IMDb [CEO] (Interstellar)
JoBlo #1 (Boyhood)
JoBlo #2 (Whiplash)
Josh Lister Review Blog (Guardians of the Galaxy)
Mark Kermode [part one]  
New Zealand Herald (Interstellar)
Onion A/V Club (Boyhood)
Quiet Earth (Hard to be a God)
Ropes of Silicon (Birdman)
Screen Crush (Nightcrawler)
Slate  
This is Mine (Blue Ruin)
Tony Macklin (American Sniper)
Troma [Lloyd Kaufman] (Guardians of the Galaxy)
Variety (Goodbye to Language)

[worst] Onion A/V Club (Left Behind)
[worst] Screen Crush
[for “grown-ups”] AARP
[horror] Fangoria
[horror] Icons of Fright (At the Devil’s Door)
[animated] T10 Image
[best scenes] Onion A/V Club
[most overrated] Joyless Creatures (Snowpiercer)
[best posters] The Playlist
[about women] IndieWire
[documentaries] The Playlist (The Overnighters)
[indies] Let Us Nerd (The Lengths)

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Blu-Ray Review: Two for the Road

Director: Stanley Donen
Screenplay: Frederic Raphael
Starring: Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney, Eleanor Bron, William Daniels
Producer: Stanley Donen
Country: UK
Running Time: 111 min
Year: 1967
BBFC Certificate: PG


With a library as strong as theirs, I have a trust in Eureka’s Masters of Cinema collection where I will happily watch pretty much any of the films they release. This trust has paid dividends and I’ve discovered numerous films over the years that I wouldn’t normally have given a second glance but turn out to be amazing. What pleases one might not please another though and every release can’t always blow me away. Stanley Dolan’s Two For the Road is one such a film. I hadn’t heard of it before, but with a decent cast, celebrated director and the Masters of Cinema seal of approval I gave it a shot. It wasn’t a total misfire, but the film wasn’t one of the revelations I hope I’ll find each time I put a disc from the prestigious label in my player.

Before I explain why the film wasn’t for me, let me tell you more about it. Two For the Road opens with an unhappily married couple, Mark (Albert Finney) and Joanna (Audrey Hepburn), travelling through Central Europe from England. As they ponder whether or not they should give up and get a divorce, we are taken back to three previous journeys in the same area they shared at different stages of their relationship. By jumping between the four stories, we see the ins and outs and the ups and downs of love and marriage.

Like the characters in the film, I had a rocky journey with this one. I really struggled with the first half, finding it very slow and unengaging. However, as the film moved on it grew on me and I got more engaged in the latter half. Also, when I went back to watch the film with the commentary, I found myself better appreciating the earlier portions of the film.

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