Trailer: Southpaw

This trailer had me until Antoine Fuqua. Jake Gyllenhal as a boxer who took one too many punches, Rachel McAdams as his beautiful wife, hyper tracking shot along the ropes. But then Fuqua, wife beautifully dying, child in peril, overly glossed up nonsense with only a veneer of grit that panders to lowest common denominator. Am I wrong? After a wonderful 2014 for Gyllenhaal where he gave perhaps the three best performances (both his Enemy doppelgangers and Nightcrawler, both the half-hearted Nailed release and now this, hmmm. I hope it gets better.

Teaser: 007 in S.P.E.C.T.R.E.

The magnificent cinematography, the continuing story line from Skyfall, and the sense that the filmmaking on display has unequivocally gotten to absolutely the A-Level after the franchise crossed the 50 year mark.

Enjoy the teaser trailer for the latest chapter in the Daniel Craig era of James Bond. Plus, some bonus silky, shadowy vocal stylings of Sir Christoph Waltz.

Trailer: Maggie

Lionsgate mysteriously pulled this film from the schedule of the 2014 edition of Toronto International Film Festival at the last minute. Now the studio is quoting the TIFF festival guide in their trailer. Hmmm. Either way, Arnold Schwarzenegger joins the ongoing Zombie party with this tale of a father-daughter relationship strained by her infection with undead-ness in Maggie.

Comfortably wearing his years, and giving the film (or at least, the trailer) a melancholy tone, this is very much a new page in the Ex-Governor of California film career as he fully embraces his age, even if it feels like we’ve had far too many variations on the undead at this this point. Abigail Breslin, no stranger to the genre after appearing in Zombieland a few years ago, plays his daughter.

Have a look and leave your thoughts in the comment section.

Trailer: Slow West

slowwest

Ahh, westerns. We love ‘em so much here in the third row, they have their own category.

Slow West premiered to positive reviews at Sundance this year and by the looks of the trailer, I can see why. The film, which is directed by John Maclean, stars Michael Fassbender as a gunslinger guiding a young man, played by Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Road), across the west to find his love. It co-stars Ben Mendelsohn (The Dark Knight Rises, Killing Them Softly), Rory McCann (Game of Thrones), and Brooke Williams.

It looks a little less gritty and a little more fun–that’s to say a little less Wild Bunch and a little more Josey Wales.

Slow West drops in select theaters on May 15, 2015.

**UPDATED** Full Trailer: Mission Impossible 5

In its fifth entry, the Mission Impossible franchise doubles down on crazy-real stunts involving its aging leading man, Tom Cruise. Previously, he was climbing around on the outside of Dubai’s Burj Kalifa skyscraper. Here he is struggling on the outside of a gargantuan military aircraft as it takes off. Impressive stuff.

The rest of the trailer is more of what you would expect from the fifth entry of a franchise. Christopher McQuarrie taking over for Brad Bird in the director department seems like an OK choice, but the screenplay, written by Iron Man 3 scribe Drew Pearce and video game writer Will Staples, involves a shadow-agency — an evil mirror of the IMF — and is as lazy as one can get; probably another indication of Bad Robot being the ongoing shepherd for the franchise.

Would you like to know more…?

Trailer: Albert Maysles’ Iris

“I didn’t give a damn about going to the party, or being at the party. It was getting dressed for the party – And there is poetry in that.” Albert Maysles‘ penultimate film, Iris, gets a high energy, very funny trailer with its 93 year old eponymous subject, fashion artist Iris Apfel, having full comfort in front of the camera. The more documentaries I watch, the more I fall in love with character-based ones, and this one looks to be full of vim and vigour. Maysles himself gets a nice on-camera cameo at the end, too.

Magnolia is releasing the documentary theatrically on April 29th.

Iris Apfel, quick-witted, and flamboyantly dressed 93-year-old style maven has had an outsized presence on the New York fashion scene for decades. More than a fashion film, the documentary is a story about creativity and how, even at Iris’ advanced age, a soaring free spirit continues to inspire. IRIS portrays a singular woman whose enthusiasm for fashion, art and people are life’s sustenance and reminds us that dressing, and indeed life, is nothing but an experiment. Despite the abundance of glamour in her current life, she continues to embrace the values and work ethic established during a middle-class Queens upbringing during the Great Depression.

Trailer: Tomorrowland

Another day, another chosen-one hero journey. Brad Bird’s foray into Disney live action film making (previously he made Ratatouille & The Incredibles for Pixar, Mission Impossible 4 for Paramount and The Iron Giant for Warner Brothers) looks like a handsome journey into the unknown, and in a recent trend, the chosen one is a girl instead of a boy. I like the bright, glossy visuals, but otherwise, this sort of thing looks very familiar. Tomorrowland is co-written by Brad Bird and Damon Lindelof (Lost, Prometheus) and starring Britt Robertson, George Clooney, and Hugh Laurie.

Bound by a shared destiny, a teen bursting with scientific curiosity and a former boy-genius inventor embark on a mission to unearth the secrets of a place somewhere in time and space that exists in their collective memory

Trailer: 88

Ahhh, Millennium Entertainment, prolific purveyor of second rate trash cinema, and the ersatz heir to Cannon/Golan-Globus. Usually I try to ignore their star-driven exercises in formula, but this one, directed by a woman (April Mullen), which might be a first for the company, caught my eye.

Canadian cult actress Katherine Isabelle (Ginger Snaps, American Mary) stars as an ass-kicking, Memento-memory’d woman out for revenge after a violent thug (Christopher Lloyd, chewing scenery magnificently) had her husband killed. Another cult Canuck actor, Michael Ironside (a personal favourite), plays the cop out to catch (or help?) her before she gets the job done. Blend that up with oversaturated colours, crazy shifts in tone, and other forms of acute lack of restraint and I am all in. Hopefully this Domino-lite will get some limited theatrical somewhere, but I’m not holding my breath considering it has been out on BLU-Ray in The US since January.

Check out the trailer below.

A Game of Drones – Trailer for Andrew Niccol’s Good Kill

Will Andrew Niccol’s latest capture the imagination and box-office in a similar fashion to American Sniper? On the surface, both films share a number of commonalities, not the least of which are soldiers having to kill their enemies from afar, with a certain unquestioning detachment. Niccol has made a career out of questioning the emotional and psychological significance of where we are and where we are going in terms of technology and its applications; from the sci-fi genetics drama Gattaca (also starring Ethan Hawke) to synthetic actors in S1Mone, to his screenplay for Peter Weir’s The Truman Show. Here he gets to play in the theater of the current Middle East and drone warfare. I think Good Kill will be better than American Sniper, but likely ignored by the public at large due to a falsely perceived copy-cat-itis.

In an air-conditioned shipping container somewhere in the Nevada desert, a war is being waged. Behind a door that reads “YOU ARE NOW LEAVING THE USA,” five flight-suited US Air Force officers operate drones that hover above “zones of interest” in the Middle East. At the press of a button, tiny targets viewed on computer screens vanish in plumes of smoke, as in a videogame. Egan (Ethan Hawke) used to live to fly. Now, he spends eight hours each day fighting the War on Terror by remote control and the remaining time at his suburban home, where he feuds with his wife (Mad Men’s January Jones), and numbs his boredom, rage, and guilt with alcohol. When Egan and his crew are told to start taking orders directly from the CIA — which selects its targets based not on personal profiles but patterns of activity — the notion of a “good” kill becomes even more maddeningly abstract, and Egan’s ability to comply with his superiors’ directives reaches its breaking point.

We’ve got the trailer below.