Trailer #2 for Katheryn Bigelow’s Detroit

“Change is coming.” is the mantra of this second, ominous trailer for Kathryn Bigelow’s retelling of the 1967 Algiers Motel massacre during Detroit’s 12th Street Riot’s. There is also a period snapshot of the city, including a rather tense collection of police coercion, both in the station house, and in the field. This film looks like a technical and emotional tour-de-force, and remains one of my most anticipated films for 2017.

Trailer: Flatliners

Behold! The sound of scraping the bottom of the barrel. In this, the year of our lord, Two Thousand and Seventeen, Ellen Page will star in a remake of inessential goofball 1990 young actor showcase, Flatliners. Directed by Niels Arden Oplev (Dead Man Down), and catering to an audience of absolutely no-one, the trailer primal-screams, “Maybe you should be watching Final Destination 3.” Words cannot describe how un-interesting this idea is at this point in time. People should be sacked, which is the only reason why I am posting the trailer (above) in the first place. Ellen. Ellen. Ellen. Did you need a new swimming pool that much?

Trailer: Kenneth Branagh’s Murder On The Orient Express

Here is a classic murder-mystery property, made many, many times in one form or another, from Agatha Christie’s classic novel of the same name. Kenneth Branagh, who has been making special effects heavy Disney pictures for some time now (Thor, Cinderella), merges this talent with his tastes for classical British properties, to offer a glossy blockbuster version of the The Murder On The Orient Express with a cast that seems far more eccentric than obvious. There is the given casting of Judy Dench, and Branagh himself, sporting spectacular facial hair, as super-detective Hercule Poirot. There is also new Disney favourites Daisy Ridley and Josh Gad, certainly not a Disney favorite, Johnny Depp (who release bomb after bomb lately), as well as the magnificent Derek Jacobi (always welcome in affairs such as these) as well as a sweet celebrity grab-bag of Michelle Pfieffer, Willem Dafoe, and Penelope Cruz.

This all looks like good ‘murder party’ fun, stilted-grandiose line deliveries and all, and will be getting an ultra-wide release November 10th from 20th Century Fox.

Trailer: Logan Lucky

Steven Soderbergh is back! The producer-director is ever threatening retirement, but never quite getting there. After a stint on TV, including directing two seasons of period medical drama The Knick and made for TV teleplay, Mosaic, and producing Red Oaks, Godless and The Girlfriend Experience, the itch to make another A-lister heist film must have proved too great a draw. And now we have this goofy, southern-fried hold up of a motor speedway with Channing Tatum, Adam Driver, Katherine Waterson, Riley Keough, and a thickly accented, cast-way against type, Daniel Craig. Also, Soderbergh has dusted off Hillary Swank (remember her?) and Katie Holmes (ditto) and offered them fresh opportunities, also against type.

Trying to reverse a family curse, brothers Jimmy and Clyde Logan set out to execute an elaborate robbery during the legendary Coca-Cola 600 race at Charlotte Motor Speedway.

Given the poster, the typesetting and the overall tone here, I expected this to be a period piece, something in the vein of Smokey and the Bandit. Nope! Logan Lucky is nothing if not contemporary, right up to when the aw-shucks computer expert brags about ‘knowing all the Twitters.”

As usual, Soderbergh bucks the trend of modern franchise building special-effects pieces, and goes right to the point of letting the acting, character-building rhythms, and snazzy filmmaking do the heavy lifting. I do not expect Logan Lucky to be high art, but I do expect it to be a highly entertaining throwback in the way that The Nice Guys was last year.

Written by Rebecca Blunt and directed by Steven Soderbergh, Logan Lucky hits theatres August 18th, 2017.

Trailer: Wind River

Taylor Sheridan wrote Sicario for Dennis Villeneuve and Hell or High Water for David Mackenzie. Now, he’s directing one of his own screenplays, a wintry noir called Wind River. An FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) teams with the town’s veteran game tracker (Jeremy Renner) to investigate a murder that occurred on a Native American reservation. Canadian veteran actor Graham Green is the local police presence, and Canuck rocker Hugh Dillon (The Headstones, Hard Core Logo) also has a small part. I’m a sucker for procedural crime movies set in the winter (from Fargo, to Insomnia, to Smilla’s Sense of Snow) and this looks superb in that ‘no nonsense’ Sheridan fashion.

Wind River will be getting a semi-wide release from The Weinstein Company on August 4th.

Star Trek: Discovery First Look Trailer

With the huge popularity of the rebooted Star Trek films, I suppose it was inevitable that another go at a series would ensue. Hello to Jason Isaacs!

After the somewhat mediocre response to the last outing with Scott Bakula and company, I can only imagine that the game will be seriously upped for this endeavor. Bigger budget, better effects, higher profile cast and for the love of God get that opening theme song into something that won’t make people put between the sofa cushions!

Star Trek: Discovery has a lot of notable names and familiar faces but honestly… give me Michelle Yeoh commanding a starship and the rest of it can be filled with Tribbles for all I care. I think this is going to be a lot of fun though – and hopefully thoughful as well. Of course it could all end up imploding under the weight of the new movies, but with TV what it has been as of late, I’m fairly optimistic for this new series going

Trailer: Long Strange Trip

There are too many mediocre music docs. This is definitely NOT one of those. Amazon Prime financed Amir Bar-Lev’s epic four-hour Grateful Dead documentary, which was built almost entirely out of unearthed archived video. And if you have seen the official Grateful Dead archive, it looks (I’m not kidding) a lot like that Area 51 matte painting in Raiders of the Lost Ark. Long Strange Trip starts out when Jerry Garcia is a teenager, and ends with his death in 1995, and in between it (somehow) acts as both a primer for novices, and a very specific set of images and information for experts. I caught it at Hot Docs and it played like gangbusters with an enthusiastic (and greying) crowd. Also, the bands first Tour Manager has a voice that is dead-on Michael Caine, so even in the talking heads segments you are in good hands.

The 30-year odyssey of the Grateful Dead was the most unlikely success story in rock ’n’ roll history. Famously averse to publicity and seemingly incapable of recording radio-friendly hits, they flouted music-industry convention by giving their live music away to a global network of tape traders and becoming the highest-grossing concert act in America through word of mouth alone.

Long Strange Trip is the first full-length documentary to explore the fiercely independent vision, perpetual innovation, and uncompromising commitment to their audience that made the Bay Area band one of the most influential musical groups of their generation. Artfully assembling candid interviews with the band, road crew, family members and notable Deadheads (including Minneapolis Senator Al Frankin), director Bar-Lev reveals the untold history of the Dead and the freewheeling psychedelic subculture that sprouted up around it. The film also provides poignant insight into the psyche of late lead guitarist Jerry Garcia, whose disdain for authority clashed with his de facto leadership of the sprawling collective that kept the show on the road.

With a soundtrack that captures some of the band’s most dynamic live performances as well as unguarded offstage moments and never-before-seen interviews, footage and photos, Long Strange Trip explores the Dead’s singular experiment in radically eclectic music making. Much more than the “behind the music” backstory of an exceptionally talented and beloved group of musicians, the film is at once an inspiring tale of unfettered artistic expression, a heartfelt American tragedy, and an incisive history of the rise and fall of 20th-century counterculture.

Amazon Studios is giving the film a limited release in NY & LA on May 26th, and across the country in select theaters for single night playdates, but if you have Amazon Prime, Long Strange Trip will be available worldwide on that streaming platform on June 2nd.

Trailer: War For The Planet of the Apes

War. What is it good for?

The rebooted Planet of the Apes series keeps on chugging, and keeps on empathizing with the Apes, while making the human villains more vile with each chapter. Here we have a genocidal Colonel played by Woody Harrelson with his military apparatus, juxtaposed against Ur-Ape, Caesar (Andy Serkis returning) taking in a human orphan. As always the motion capture animation of the Apes is astounding.

After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, Caesar wrestles with his darker instincts and begins his own quest to avenge his kind. As the journey finally brings them face to face, Caesar and the Colonel are pitted against each other in a battle that will determine the fate of both their species and the future of the planet.

Oh, and writers, please, let us all place a moratorium on “I didn’t start this , but I WILL finish it.” (blech.)

Trailer: Woodshock


 

Directed by the Mulleavy Sisters, Kate and Laura, who made a splash in the fashion world with their Rodarte collection, Woodshock, their first feature promises an impressionistic, acid-trip portrait off loss and grief. The film is getting a release from risk taking production/distribution label, A24. Starring Kirsten Dunst (in full Melancholia mode) shown in super-long-shot, her tiny form up against mighty Redwood trees and endless watery vistas. Woodshock, at first glance appears to be in the space between Sophia Coppola and Jean-Marc Vallee’s Demolition, all lovely anxiety. The ubiquitous Danish actor Pilou Asbaek (Game of Thrones, The Great Wall, Ghost in the Shell) co-stars.

Woodshock is getting a theatrical release on September 15, 2017.

Trailer: Blade Runner 2


 

The full trailer for Denis Villeneuve’s epic-scaled Blade Runner sequel has arrived, and it is glorious. In terms of future hologram bespackled cities, Ghost in the Shell, in hindsight was simply an amuse-bouche to the feast that Roger Deakins has prepared for us. Cold grey-blues, Fury-Road oranges, infinite whites, and twinkling Atari lights.
Oh My.

In terms of new cast members Robin Wright and Jared Leto introduced here, as does Ana de Armas (blink at the right point, and you will miss Dave Bautista).

I hope the story is as beautiful as everything on display here. I expect nothing short than greatness, even as I believe that movie will explicitly, in no uncertain terms, finally INSIST that Deckard is a replicant, and likely all of the police force.

Blown away here at the moment, though. Enjoy.

Trailer: The Limehouse Golem


 

“Even madness has its own logic.” I love a good period-procedural, and this London set 19th century serial killer mystery is verdantly populated with character, costume and blood.

Bill Nighy plays the investigator, Eddie Marsan one of the suspects, and Daniel Hays the beat-walking cop (for invisible character actor context, many saw him murdered by Diego Luna in the early minutes of Rogue One, but I like his contributions to the Red Riding Trilogy, Mr. Nobody and several recent Mike Leigh pictures among other things). Olivia Cooke is the central witness and narrator of the picture, which aims to combine a lot of elements into a satisfying old-school kind of whole.

Spanish director Juan Carlos Medina could not quite pull juggling so many balls in his debut feature, Painless, a horror-investation about children in a mental asylum and the consequences of this institution across the years. By all accounts at last Septembers edition TIFF, The Limehouse Golem does not suffer from such muddled narrative confusion.

Set on the unforgiving, squalid streets of Victorian London in 1880, our tale begins in the baroque, grandiose music hall where the capital’s most renowned performer Dan Leno (Douglas Booth) takes to the stage. The whimsical thespian performs a monologue, informing his dedicated audience of the ghastly fate of a young woman who had once adorned this very stage, his dear friend Elizabeth Cree (Olivia Cooke); for the beguiling songstress is facing up to her forthcoming death by hanging, having been accused of murdering her husband John Cree (Sam Reid). Lizzie’s death seems inevitable, until Detective Inspector John Kildare (Bill Nighy) is assigned to the case of the Limehouse Golem – a nefarious, calculating serial killer, murdering innocent, unconnected victims, leaving behind barely identifiable corpses – and his distinctive signature in blood. All is not what it seems and everyone is a suspect and everyone has a secret.

The Limehouse Golem opens this September.