Archive for the ‘Lists’ Category

  • Musical Top Ten for 2013

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    artwork manipulation courtesy of Spin.

    Of course we’re all about the movies around here. But we also have day jobs (some of us). And we also have to get to the theater in a car or bus with stereo/iPod jamming; which means the amount of actual minutes consuming music vastly outweighs our movie watching. So throughout the year we take note of what sounds get us from place to place, help us get through the daily grind and just generally enhance our well-being. In the past year, this is the aural landscape that we traveled through most frequently and at our happiest. Welcome to the RowThree Musical “Best Of” lists for 2013.

    Scott Olson
    Bob Turnbull
    Andrew James
    David Brook
    Ryan McNeil

     
    By all means, drop some of your favorites in the comments section below.
    Welcome to 2014!

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Row Three Favorite Films (2013)

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    For what is probably the first time in RowThree history we were actually able to get our acts together and dish out the annual “best of” list in a timely manner (i.e. before February). Everyone on the team contributed their version of what stood out most in 2013 through the eye of cinema. Mostly in the form of a Top Ten list, but there are some other goodies and observations in here as well. Scroll your mouse wheel down or click any of the names below to jump right to a specific list and/or permalink. Then start thinking about what you want to include in your list for 2014.


    Marina Antunes
    David Brook
    Matthew Brown
    Ariel Fisher
    Kurt Halfyard
    Andrew James
    Ryan McNeil
    Matt Price
    Bob Turnbull

    Consensus

     
    By all means, drop some of your favorites in the comments section below.
    Welcome to 2013!

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • My Movie Moments of 2013

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    2013Moments-GirlWalk

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    Though I didn’t keep very good track throughout the past 12 months, I think I’ve cobbled together some of my favourite moments from 2013′s films as well as some older movies I saw for the first time. So here’s a random walk through them…

     

    2013 films:

    2013Moments-TwentyFeetFromStardom
    • Best spine-tingling, goose-bump raising moment of the year: Merry Clayton’s rendition of “Southern Man” in Twenty Feet From Stardom. You can almost feel the spittle as she tears into the song while her backup band shreds it.
    • The joy of playing music when you’re young in We Are The Best! and Metalhead.
    • Mark Ruffalo’s music producer imagining the instruments and arrangement backing up a solo acoustic performance in Can A Song Save Your Life?.
    • “Who starts a song like that?” – Christian Bale’s American Hustle hustler talking about “Jeep’s Blues” by Duke Ellington.
    • “Five Hundred Miles” performed in Inside Llewyn Davis.
    2013Moments-NeighboringSounds
    • The red waterfalls in Byzantium and Neighboring Sounds – one a recurring motif reflecting the “birth” of a vampire and the other a shocking sudden foreshadowing.
    • The effective use of colour in Stoker.
    • The bright colours in Only God Forgives and Trance.
    • All those gorgeous sunsets in Spring Breakers.
    • The opening shot of billows of dirty water cascading down like an avalanche in Watermark.

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • 10 Teachers You Wish Had Taught You

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    This is a repost from the weeks leading up to the 2011 school year, but its just as appropriate now as it was then. Who did we miss? Who shouldn’t have been included? Join in on the discussion!

    With young people all over rushing to Wal-Marts and K-Marts and Targets to purchase their backpacks and pencils and pocket protectors, and with teachers gearing up for the school year by viewing marathon sessions of their favorite films portraying teachers, what better than to have Row Three’s resident educator release a list of the fictional teachers of all levels who have inspired him?

    That is precisely what you are here to read – yet this isn’t your eighth grade algebra teacher’s list. Move over, Edward James Olmos. Nobody wants to be inspired to learn nowadays. Watch out, Robin Williams. You’re too soft and influenced far too many terrible graduation speeches. Sorry, Michelle, nobody is falling for the leather jacket anymore. This isn’t the nineties.

    These are the teachers you wish you had. These are the teachers that every teacher wants to be more like.

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • The Top Five Casino Films

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    The black ties and sparkling ball gowns, the black and red of the roulette wheel, the deep green baize of the tables. It’s easy to see why directors want to use casinos as the backdrop for their movies. Some of the greatest and bestselling films of the last few years have featured casinos. We look at the top five casino films.

    1. Casino
    From the incredible director Martin Scorsese, and with a top-billed cast including Scorsese’s favourite actor, Robert De Niro. Casino is centered on a Mafiosi runner, played by De Niro, who is sent to Las Vegas to oversee the running of a casino. When the casino is a runaway success, an enforcer is sent, supposedly to look after the security. However, this enforcer, played by Joe Pesci, proves to be a little too much for De Niro’s character to handle at the same time as the new gambling empire. The film is a brutal and powerful examination of the old-style mob connections to Las Vegas.

    2. The Hangover
    The Hangover is one of the biggest selling movies of the last few years, grossing nearly half a billion dollars worldwide and spawning two frankly tired sequels. The film is about a group of men away on a stag party, who get accidentally roofied and have to piece together the night before. It would be safer to stay at home and Play vegas slots with Bgo.com! With some highlights including a scene spoofing Rain Man, there are laughs in every scene of this great film, which stars Ken Jeong as the comedy villain Mr Chow.

    3. Rounders
    Rounders is so good that poker players say that it inspired them to get into the high-stakes poker scene. The movie stars a young Matt Damon as a reformed gambler who is forced once again to enter the seedy underbelly of the world of high-stakes poker to save a friend who has to pay off a huge debt played by Edward Norton. The film is a high-class adventure and definitely worth a watch.

    4. Casino Royale
    The reboot to the Bond franchise brought in Daniel Craig as the namesake spy, and opens with a high octane chase scene through a dangerous building site. The plot is centered on Bond, who plays a high-stakes gambling game against a weapons dealer. This film brought some much needed darkness to the Bond role after the stupidity of Pierce Brosnan’s Bond, with his over-reliance on daft gadgets such as the invisible car.

    5. 21
    21 stars Kevin Spacey and Laurence Fishburne and focuses on a real-life team of card counters from MIT. These students play high-stakes Blackjack and manage to win huge sums. However, the casinos realize what is happening and try to recoup their losses.

  • Where Have All the Fathers Gone? Good Dads are Rare in Cinema

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    Fathers on film get short shrift as role models. This may be that movies, or rather screenplays need drama, and drama usually spells conflict. So if it is a movie where fatherhood is a theme, Dad is portrayed as either clueless (The Ice Storm, Back To The Future, disengaged (The Incredibles) or overprotective (Finding Nemo), faltering morally (The Bicycle Thief, Catch Me If You Can), generally unsupportive or aware of who their child actually is (C.R.A.Z.Y., Paranorman, How To Train Your Dragon, The Little Mermaid, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Brave, The Croods…basically most modern American animated movies), dangerously obsessive (The Mosquito Coast), violent and abusive (The Shining, Precious, The War Zone), or simply abandon the household all together (Close Encounters of the Third Kind). Perhaps the worst ever is Daniel Plainview. As essayed by Daniel Day Lewis in There Will Be Blood, he is a borderline sociopath who raises his boy as a cute, therefore effective, prop for his unfettered capitalistic ambitions and all but abandons him -twice- when that purpose is served.

    Often when the dad is an encouraging, loving role-model, they exist only in memory (see Contact, below) or are eliminated after first act of the film (Leto Atreides in Dune, The Magistrate in Sansho The Bailiff, Mustafa in The Lion King). Even more often, the best dads seen on film are surrogate fathers rather than biological ones: Pa Kent in Superman, Ben Parker in Spiderman, John Hurt in Hellboy (if comics are your thing) or the kindly projectionist in Cinema Paradiso, Robin Williams in (take your pick) Dead Poets Society or Good Will Hunting, Tom Hanks in Catch Me If You Can, and of course Bilbo Baggins to his nephew Frodo in Lord of the Rings.

    A good father increases his child’s wonder and engagement with the world, provides a safe-haven for health of spirit and body, and provides the toolset for his child to go out in the world. He offers a sense or humour, fair and calm evaluation of situations both good and bad, and hopefully a little dignity in how one goes about their business. Looking around the web amongst the terribly repetitive ‘Best of’ kind of lists for movie dads, not only do we see a scarcity of truly good paternal role models, but those cobbling together these things favour the fathers that either drowning in their good intentions with no clue at what to do, as in the Vacation films or are cloyingly overbearing as in either version of the Father of the Bride, or they choose the unending tirades of violence and revenge – take your pick: Kick-Ass (Nic Cage), Taken (Liam Neeson), The Godfather (Marlon Brando), Die Hard (Bruce Willis), Hanna (Eric Bana), In The Bedroom (Tom Wiklinson), Death Wish (Charles Bronson), Road To Perdition (Tom Hanks). These are films that showcase parenting as a means for their kids to survive by violence, enact violent revenge and retribution for harm done to their child, or commit violence as a living to raise their family and while (amazingly) are not completely bankrupt of parenting ideals, they are hardly the shining examples to hold up.

    So now that we have the bad out of the way, and have partially defined what to look for in a good cinema father, here are a few films in which the fathers represented offer some respectability to the institution.

    Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck, TO KILL A MOCKING BIRD)

    Clearly the easiest and most shining example on the list, Finch is a man of significance in his community with a very straight moral compass, and a sense of dignity about his affairs, even when stumping for one of cinema’s great movie speechs. He stands up for himself and his family under no small amount of social pressure for defending those with less privilege in a time and part of the country that under the cloud or racism. More than that, he is gentle and kind with his children without ever pampering or over-entitling him. The film was made when America was at her greatest, and Peck’s portrayal remains perhaps the most iconic movie-dad ever committed to cinema. In short, he leads by examples, means what he says and says what he means. To further underscore his parental excellence, the final shot of the film is Atticus warmly watching his son while he sleeps.

    Ted Arroway (David Morse, CONTACT)

    David Morse is a curious actor, he can be play an unrequited monster (Dancer in the Dark, 12 Monkeys) or in the case of his Ted Arroway in Robert Zemeckis’s Contact, the warmest of father figures. Like Atticus Finch, he is a single parent, so is responsible for imparting both sides of the parenting equation to his young daughter. Instilling a love of communication and curiosity in his daughter both on earth and in heaven (or rather, outer space) and perhaps most important, a sense of patience and practicality (“turn the knob slower“) upon his daughter Ellie. His pride at his daughters accomplishment, and wonder at the vastness of the universe is also communicated very well to both her and the audience.

    Chef Chu (Lung Sihung, EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN)

    A third Widowed father (I am sensing a trend here), Mr. Chu maintains his relationship with his three very different daughters via a large Sunday meal prepared by his own hands. As each of his daughters push further into the modern and western model of women with corporate careers, he offers them a place for their problems at the table without (vocalized) judgement of them. While Mr. Chu is undeniably old fashioned (and reserved) China in a fast-paced and complicated globalized world, he imparts a very real sense of tradition to ground all the craziness. His daughters do not miss these meals, not because he forces them to come, but rather that its how they communicate with their father and each other. Mr. Chu exhibits a quiet dignity and that is not without charm, such as when he starts preparing elaborate lunches for a friends daughter to take to school. He may be a little more reserved than the other dads on this list, but it is clear he has found a some sort of balance in the world with his family.

    ‘Lucky’ Jack Aubrey/Steven Maturin (Russell Crowe, Paul Bettany as surrogate dads, MASTER AND COMMANDER)

    Young Lord Blakeney is doing his duty at sea at a very young age. While an officer, he is only 13 years old and exceptionally quite mature, is very much still a child. With his real father presumably safe on English Soil, he is on the Acheron, a military ship under the command of Jack Aubrey. Early in the film Blakeney loses his arm to infection from splinters caused by enemy canon fire. In a very powerful scene, it is clear that Jack loves the boy and content to play the role of surrogate father. The ships doctor, who indeed severs the wounded arm, also takes him under wing, and a large part of the films characterization is the push-pull of the Military – Science teachings upon the boy. There is a power to teaching the young officer wonder at the variety and mystery of the Natural world and the sacrifices to be made at the hands of leadership and duty. Ultimately one suspects that Lord Blakeney would rise to be a very great, and fulfilled man had there been any sequels to the film with such excellent role models and stand-in-dads.

    Dill (Stanley Tucci, EASY A)

    Spell it with your peas!” is the giddy suggestion from Stanley Tucci’s movie-dad, Dill, upon hearing his daughter got the boot from class for uttering foul language because he doesn’t want her to repeat the word out loud in front of her younger brother. Dill is acutely aware of his daughters adolescence, but feels he has taught her so much about being a good human being (this is of course off screen before the setting of the film, but clear in his body language) that he is willing to let her make her own mistakes. And yet it also makes it clear that while he respects her intelligence and her space, he is there if she needs him. Dill is unabashedly geeky, but clearly has a great relationship with his equally self-deprecating wife (Patricia Clarkson, also a great movie-mom) and they want to lead by the example of their love and playfulness to their children. As much as I liked Easy A, the parenting part of the film is easily my favourite part. While it is rather unabashed in its aim to be a modern John Hughes picture, Dill trumps any of the well rounded parent characters in any of Hughes’ pictures (Yes, including the excellent Harry Dean Stanton in Pretty in Pink).

    Tatsuo Kusakabe (Shigesato Itoi, MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO)

    One of my favourite movie Dads in one of the best parenting movies of all time. Professer Kusakabe’s wife is sick in the hospital, and he is moving his daughters into a new house in the countryside. Wanting to make the best of the transition from city to country, without mom present, he encourages his daughters to help him make the old house livable for their family, while giving them the freedom to explore the grounds at their own pace. He assuages fears with laughter, but is never dishonest about their mothers condition (which I do not believe is fatal, but still serious.) While the littlest daughter Mei does go missing on account of his not being there, he deals with the situation, erring on the side of giving his children freedom rather than suffocating them. My Neighbor Totoro is a wonderful movie that ever parent should show their children, not only for its magic and whimsy, but also for its novel take on parenting.

    Pod (Tomokazu Miura (or Will Arnett/Mark Strong if you prefer the USA/UK Dubs) THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY)

    Yes, there are two Studio Ghibli movies on this list, most likely because, unlike their American equivalent, Disney, Ghibli tends to craft their tales around unbroken family units and incorporates their precocious young heroes into the greater social fabric, instead of constantly rebelling or subsuming it. So, I will happily include the often overlooked (or outright dismissed) animated adaptation of The Borrowers because indeed, the dad in this one is magnificent. The movie’s first chief incident is Pod, the father, taking his daughter on her first ‘borrowing’ mission. He gently guides her up the lengthy route from their tiny abode below the floor boards into the vast and intimidating world above. He helps her, but gives her space. The image of Pod quietly holding the light and waiting for his daughter to complete her climb is a powerful one. Further, when Arrietty gets entangled with a ‘big person’ in the form of the visting boy who is at the house to convalesce from physical ailment and prepare for heart surgery, her father calmly makes decisions while never outright belittling his daughter for her discoveries. The man is an ocean of calm, but you can see the care and the love painted in the margins. The whole film is that way, there is a lot of depth underneath those quiet, serene surfaces.

    The Man (Viggo Mortensen, THE ROAD)

    OK, this is the toughest one on the list, because unlike most of the other entries here, the main characters are in constant danger, and the world is not full of wonders or promise, but rather a post apocalyptic wasteland where death comes in many forms and life is a living hell. Dad here is also a widower – but 99% of the worlds population is, gone, so there is that – but feels more importantly than he and his son surviving in this world of ash, is that they survive together. While this is ultimate not meant to be (as death comes to us all in the end,) I imagine that the soul of the father watching down might be comforted that they boy is picked up by a potentially complete family near the end of the film, one of the very few positive notes in an otherwise soul-crushing downer of a film. Nevertheless, while travelling to some vague destination over the course (coarse?) of the film, and the Cormac McCarthy novel it was based upon, the father instills what is left, under the circumstances, of a moral code upon his son (i.e. no unnecessary killing and definitely no cannibalism) along with a number of survival skills and a fair bit of kindness and love. Sometimes that is what matters most.

  • My 13 Most Anticipated Films of 2013

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    Anticipated2013MoodIndigo

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    In honour of finally seeing a 2013 movie that I’ve been eager to catch (Chan-wook Park’s Stoker – which was a heaping batch of candy and colour coated fun), I thought I would lay out some of the films I’m most excited to see in 2013. I’m sure I’ve missed a bunch (I’ve heard that Lucretia Martel has a new one coming out this year, but haven’t found any confirmation) and I could make the list even longer (sorry Richard Kelly and Terry Gilliam – you guys just missed the cut), but these 13 stand out as my most anticipated:

     

    Mood Indigo – Michel Gondry

    I’ve already mentioned in a previous post that this became my number one “can’t wait for it” movie of the year the second I heard about it. I’ll always be curious what Gondry does and this looks to have a great sense of wonder to it.

     

    Anticipated2013PigeonSatOnABranch

    A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence – Roy Andersson

    This would likely be my number one if I could only be assured it was actually coming out this year…I was over the moon for Andersson’s last film You, The Living from 2007 (not to mention adoring his 2000 film Songs From The Second Floor), so I’ve been waiting somewhat, though only somewhat, patiently for the follow-up…After seeing The Story Of Film at TIFF 2011, I was able to chat very briefly with director Mark Cousins and he said he had seen Andersson’s new film and that it was amazing. And now that this is the third year in a row that predictions are being made about it’s arrival at Cannes, the patience is, ahem, wearing thin. The word “eager” doesn’t even come close to describing my anticipation.

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Favorite Older Films I Saw in 2012

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    Always an awkward post title, but I can never seem to manage to figure out a good way to sum up the kind of list I’m presenting here. My list of Top 2012 Films is included in the Row Three group post back here, but now I want to focus on the films I enjoyed the most this year which were released prior to 2012. I should stress that this is hardly an objective list, were such a thing even possible – it’s just what I liked the best and felt most desirous to share out of my first-time watches this year, excluding 2012 releases.

    What older films did you love the best in 2012?

    GIRL SHY (1924)
    FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE (1926)
    WHY WORRY (1923)

    GirlShy

    I’d seen Harold Lloyd’s best-known film Safety Last before, but I really consider 2012 my crash course in his comedy, with a trio of films I saw in close succession and really convinced me for sure that he belongs in the silent comedian pantheon. Girl Shy is, in fact, my favorite new-to-me film I’ve seen all year, and thanks to its sweet romance and breathtaking final chase scene, I actually liked it more than I do Safety Last. For Heaven’s Sake, with Lloyd as a millionaire bringing in street thugs and miscreants to fill up an inner-city mission’s pews to impress the preacher’s lovely daughter, is a ton of fun, too, full of insane gags and stunts. I liked Why Worry, with Lloyd as a hypochondriac who gets mixed up in the Mexican Civil War, the least of the three, but it’s still a solid film and a whole lot of fun. With these three under my belt, chalk me up a definite Lloyd fan.

    THE VIRGIN SPRING (1960)

    virginspring

    Sometimes Ingmar Bergman films are a bit tough for me to get into – I can appreciate their austere humanism, but they often feel remote and uninvolving to me. The Virgin Spring grabbed me immediately and didn’t let me go until I collapsed at the end breathless, like the grieving father in the story. A young girl is violated by a group of men who later unknowingly seek shelter in her father’s home, whereupon he finds out what happened and exacts retribution. But nothing is so simple in Bergman’s world, and this is a deeply thoughtful and starkly beautiful film, questioning a God who allows tragedy to happen and yet also accepting that personal vengeance may not be the best way either.

    THE DRIVER (1978)

    The-Driver

    Clearly a prototype for 2011′s Drive (a recent favorite of mine), The Driver stars Ryan O’Neal as a laconic getaway driver who’s being hunted by an arrogant cop (Bruce Dern) who wants to collar him simply because he’s never been caught. In between them are a gambling woman who may be playing both sides and a bunch of thugs who are no match for the Driver. It’s a mystery to me why this film isn’t always mentioned in the same breath with great car chase movies like Bullitt and The French Connection, because the chases here are every bit as good. Mix in the Le Samourai-esque lead character, and this film was made for me.

    SOLARIS (1972)

    Solaris

    First of all, it took me several days to get through this meditative sci-fi film musing on love and loss. I’m not proud of that, but it can certainly be blamed on my pregnancy-related tiredness at the time rather than the film itself, although the film itself is definitely on the slow side. I actually liked the pacing and thought it worked well for the kind of heady, evocative sci-fi this is. That said, because of the viewing conditions, I had difficulty holding it all in my head at once or feeling like I had a solid grasp of it by the end. I’m already looking forward to a rewatch, upon which time I think I will appreciate it even more.

    THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC (1928)

    passion-of-joan-of-arc

    I know Mike Rot (and probably others) are going to tell me that even Top Five placement is not high enough for this film, and that’s probably right. The movie is an intriguing combination of austerity (sparse set design) and raw emotion (Marie Falconetti’s extraordinary face, usually seen in close-ups). I’ve seen a couple of other Dreyer films, and I generally find them a bit difficult to relate to stylistically, and I have to say I felt kind of the same tension here. I do think some rewatches will move it much higher on my list, though – it feels like the kind of film I will grow into. Also, the print on HuluPlus does not have a music track with it, and I don’t think that helped my experience.

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • 2012 List of Lists (v 12.3) [FINAL]

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    This post has been continuously updated over the past few weeks. But I think with this last batch it’s finally time to shut it down and start looking ahead to all the great things to come in 2013. While there won’t be any new posts with lists added, I’m happy to add any list to this post if there’s one you think should be included. So by all means, email me if there’s one that needs to be added. Cheers!

    …And it’s now 2013. Here come the attack of the lists. Resistance is futile. Lists are everywhere this time of year; and not just for movies. But that’s another story because around here it’s all about the film. So as I do every year, rather than publish a daily “here’s another list from…” post, I’ll periodically (about once a week) be on the lookout for new top ten lists from critics, directors, bloggers, podcasters, the wise old owl down the street and probably Reed Farrington. Does that last need a hash tag? At any rate, this will be the go-to place for a constantly updated source to where you can find all of the movie top ten lists that are being spurted all over the interwebz. If you’ve got a list you don’t see below and think should be included, by all means email the link to me.

     
    TODAY’S UPDATES:

    Row Three (!)

    Access Hollywood
    AFI
    Bad Ass Digest (Devin Faraci)
    Big Thoughts from a Small Mind
    Blueprint Review
    Boston Globe (Ty Burr)
    Buffalo Spree
    Cast Awards
    CAST Awards (podcast version)
    CBS Philly
    Cinema Blend (Eric Eisenberg)
    Cinema Blend (Kristy Puchko)
    Cinema Blend (Mack Rawden)
    CNN
    Critical Mass Cast (Corey Pierce)
    Dead Spin
    Den of Geek
    Director’s Club Podcast
    Film Drunk
    Film Jive
    Geeks of Doom (Sean DP)
    Geeks of Doom (Famous Monster)
    Geeks of Doom (Three D)
    Huffington Post (Brad Schreiber)
    IGN
    Indie Wire (Independent Films)
    Lo Hud
    Meta Critic
    Mother Jones
    Movie Web (B. Alan Orange)
    Movie Web (Julian Roman)
    The New Orleans Times-Picayune (Mike Scott)
    NPR
    Reel Insight (Jess)
    Reel Insight (Rachel)
    Slate
    US Magazine
    USA Today

    full list of submissions under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Row Three Favorite Films of 2012

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    Per usual, the third row is traditionally the last ones out of their seats. We stay for the credits and wait for stingers before we make any conclusions. So it goes with our annual Top Ten favorites list. We have to make sure we catch as much celluloid as possible whilst putting together our consensus. If that means waiting until mid-January to see Zero Dark Thirty or Les Misérables then so be it. Enough excuses, we each put together a list in our own way and they can all be found below. Thanks to all of our readers/listeners/viewers for another terrific year around the RowThree camp fire. We’re already looking forward to next year’s lists. Cheers!


    Marina Antunes
    Andrew James
    Jandy Hardesty
    Jonathan James
    Bob Turnbull
    Kurt Halfyard
    Ross Miller
    David Brook
    Matt Price
    Matthew Brown
    Matt Gamble
    Consensus

     
    By all means, drop some of your favorites in the comments section below.
    Welcome to 2013!

    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • 2012 List of Lists (v 12.2)

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    This post will be continuously updated and a new version will be published to the main page over the coming weeks. If you find a list that is not included or want yours added, please email it to me so I can add it asap. Thanks!

    …And it’s almost 2013. Here come the attack of the lists. Resistance is futile. Lists are everywhere this time of year; and not just for movies. But that’s another story because around here it’s all about the film. So as I do every year, rather than publish a daily “here’s another list from…” post, I’ll periodically (about twice a week) be on the lookout for new top ten lists from critics, directors, bloggers, podcasters, the wise old owl down the street and probably Reed Farrington. Does that last need a hash tag? At any rate, this will be the go-to place for a constantly updated source to where you can find all of the movie top ten lists that are being spurted all over the interwebz. If you’ve got a list you don’t see below and think should be included, by all means email the link to me.

     
    TODAY’S UPDATES:

    Alamo Drafthouse
    Blu-ray.com
    Collider (Adam Chitwood)
    Collider (Matt Goldberg)
    The Documentary Blog (documentaries)
    Film Junk (podcast)
    Film Threat
    First Showing (Ethan Anderton)
    First Showing (Jeremy Kirk and Ben Pearson)
    Georgia Straight
    Indie Wire (Christopher Bell)
    Indie Wire (several)
    JoBlo (Jimmy O)
    JoBlo (Chris Bumbray)
    LetterBoxd
    Mark Kermode (audio)
    Vancouver Sun (Canadian press)
    The Matinee (podcast version)
    Movie Mezzanine
    Movies Online.ca (horror)
    The Playlist (Katie Walsh)
    Roger Ebert
    Ropes of Silicon
    Ropes of Silicon (documentaries)
    Ropes of Silicon (podcast)
    Sean Kelly on Movies
    Slashfilm
    Vancouver Sun

    full list of submissions under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

  • 2012 List of Lists (v 12.1)

    0

    This post will be continuously updated and a new version will be published to the main page over the coming weeks. If you find a list that is not included or want yours added, please email it to me so I can add it asap. Thanks!

    …And it’s almost 2013. Here come the attack of the lists. Resistance is futile. Lists are everywhere this time of year; and not just for movies. But that’s another story because around here it’s all about the film. So as I do every year, rather than publish a daily “here’s another list from…” post, I’ll periodically (about twice a week) be on the lookout for new top ten lists from critics, directors, bloggers, podcasters, the wise old owl down the street and probably Reed Farrington. Does that last need a hash tag? At any rate, this will be the go-to place for a constantly updated source to where you can find all of the movie top ten lists that are being spurted all over the interwebz. If you’ve got a list you don’t see below and think should be included, by all means email the link to me.

     
    TODAY’S UPDATES:

    Arizona Republic
    Associated Press (Christy Lemire, David Germain, Jake Coyle) [via Huffington Post]
    the Atlantic
    The Atlantic Wire
    A.V. Club
    Buzz Feed
    CBS News
    Cinema Blend (Katey Rich)
    Criterion Corner
    E! Online
    Entertainment Weekly (Owen Gleiberman)
    Entertainment Weekly (Lisa Schwarzbaum)
    Fangoria (horror)
    Film Comment
    Film Crave
    The Guardian
    Hey U Guys
    Hitfix (Gregory Ellwood)
    Hitfix (Kristopher Tapley)
    Huffington Post
    Indie Wire (Erik Kohn)
    io9 (fantasy/sci-fi)
    L.A. Times (Kenneth Turan)
    Little White Lies
    Movie Minute
    MovieFone
    Movies.com
    MTV
    New York Post
    New York Times (A.O. Scott)
    New York Times (Manohla Dargis)
    New York Times (Stephen Holden)
    The New Yorker (David Denby)
    The New Yorker (Richard Brody)
    Next Movie
    Paper Mag
    Paste (documentaries)
    Rolling Stone (Peter Travers)
    San Jose Mercury News
    Screen Crush
    Slant
    Stuff
    Thompson on Hollywood
    Time Out New York (David Fear)
    Time Out New York (Joshua Rothkopf)
    Time Out New York (Keith Uhlich)
    Total Film
    The Village Voice (Karina Longworth
    Washington Post (Ann Hornaday)
    Wired (you didn’t see)

    full list of submissions under the seats…
    » Read the rest of the entry..

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