Friday One Sheet: The Blade Runner is Still Running

In light of the strong rumour than Dennis Villeneuve is going to be the director of the long delayed sequel with a returning Harrison Ford, enjoy this handsome poster above. If we are going make another legitamite Blade Runner film (1998s Soldier doesn’t count), I cannot think of a better choice than the director of Enemy and Incendies to give it his best shot.

Here is hoping that he does NOT listen to Ridley’s whispers that Deckard is a Replicant.

Friday One Sheet: Alex of Venice

Continuing what I call the South Korean school poster-art (idiom: a clean, polished picture of a single or pair of characters with a pleasing, but vague background) we have this one for a Mary Elizabeth Winstead starring drama, Alex of Venice. Soft and warm lighting with subtle lens flaring gives off an innocent, glowing impression. And while I’m not absolutely crazy about the dueling fonts in the actual title presentation, I will admit that it does draw the eye and adds a strong visual element to an otherwise simple design. That being said, I like simple.

Friday One Sheet: Welcome To Me

It’s been a good week for Kristen Wiig, an actress who has come a long way to celebrity, and can now comfortably anchor a film on her star power alone. Her latest film gets one of the most handsome pieces of marketing this year, which to me evokes a South Korean style of doing movie posters; lean design elements, precisely spaced and coloured. The credit block is pushed up to the top, which is just the right amount of unusual from typical poster convention. And then there is that boom mike coming in off from the left. Do we need to know more? The tagline on the poster is so white it is nearly invisible, so here is an synopsis excerpt from the 2014 TIFF catalog, where it quietly played last year:

Alice Klieg suffers from borderline personality disorder, and though she manages it — and the accompanying medications and therapeutic care — fairly well, past tumult has left a broken marriage and strained familial relationships in its wake. She finds grounding in her daily routine, which includes memorizing every episode of Oprah and carefully monitoring her wardrobe and protein-laden diet. One can’t help but get the sense that Alice is straining to embrace bigger things, and when her numbers come up in the state lottery, suddenly she gets focused… on eighty million dollars’ worth of possibilities. In quick succession, Alice buys a stretch of hours at a local television company, eschews her medication and therapy, moves into a casino, and creates her own talk show about — what else? — herself. As her show gains an audience (despite some off-the-wall cooking and medical demonstrations), Alice realizes that viewers identify with her re-enactments of past hurts and social slights. What she doesn’t recognize is that her own hunger for fame may just reflect a deeper need to be heard.

Friday One Sheet: The Seventh Fire

When you get Terrence Malick to lend his credibility to your documentary, you make darn sure to put his name on the poster. Jack Pettibone Riccobono directs a documentary on a Minnesota Ojibwe reservation that has a gang problem, but he does it from the point of view of a 5-time incarcerated gang leader and his 17 year old protege.

The classic, minimalist one-sheet emphasizes sun down, and the wide open space of the midwest, but the deep red-orange could equally mean love or violence.

The Seventh Fire opens at the Berlinale Film Festival this week. The gorgeous trailer is also tucked under the seat.

Would you like to know more…?

Friday One Sheet: Foreground [No Way To Live]

I love the idea in this poster, but am nonplussed about the execution. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 percent of movie posters have a gun in them somewhere. OK, I made that stat up, but you get the idea. But do like the idea of having something in the foreground, clearly not in the poster, in front of the poster, but still in the poster. Am I making sense? Look at the gun being brandished. I’m sure someone will be a bit more creative with the idea in the near future. But for now, here is your possible new trend in One Sheet design. Much like putting age/distress into the design (which you will note is also used above) or plastering text over peoples faces, I expect to see designers, riff away on this idea, until it is pounded into a cliche, but for now it feels fresh.

Friday One Sheet: The Forbidden Room

Motion posters. There are not many of them made at this point, but as cinemas switch to screens for their poster displays, I expect there to be more of them in the future. I doubt they will be as ethereal and evocative as these from Guy Maddin’s forthcoming feature, The Forbidden Room.

Dreamy vaselined lenses and putrid yellow colour palette that remind me of smoke and water damaged book covers…In a good way. There are more tucked under the seat.

Would you like to know more…?

Friday One Sheet: Desktop Horror

One of the emerging trends of 2014 horror genre is the slow evolution of the ‘found footage’ film into a ‘live-desktop’ kind of horror picture. Nacho Vigalondo’s Open Windows was an abject disaster at pioneering this form, but by all accounts, Cybernatural, aka Unfriended, is a fair bit better. After a successful run on the festival circuit, the film edges close to a commercial release in April (VOD would be best suited considering the narrative takes place entirely from a desktop screen) it seems to have settled on the original title.

The poster itself makes wonderful use of negative space and text, albeit it eschews any standard browser window look. Bad behavior, cyber bullying, murder, suicide, are all highlighted to offer the kind of horror-promissory notes content to go along with form.

(PSSST. I’ve tucked the trailer for the film, under the seat)

Would you like to know more…?

Friday One Sheet: Maps to The Stars

Forget it Jake, it’s Tinsel town. David Cronenberg’s latest, a dark Hollywood satire called Maps To The Stars, gets a noir influenced poster; all smoke visages full of scheming and pensive anger. Somehow this film has eluded me in its Canadian release both at TIFF in 2014 and in commercial release a few months ago. The film is gearing up for its US release, so expect to hear more about the film in the coming weeks. For now enjoy this classic styled one-sheet specific to the upcoming American roll-out. If there is ever a Faye Dunaway biopic to be made, Julianne Moore makes a startling case for it here.

Friday One Sheet: Gangs of Wasseypur

It’s a couple of years out at this point, but here and there you might still find a screening for Gangs of Wasseypur we’ve reviewed it twice and gave it a good tongue bathing on the Cinecast at one point.

The poster carried on the Bollywood color tropes but man is this thing ever brutal to look at. The vengeance and hilarity and brutality all spraying forth in bloody mayhem all at once is definitely striking and eye-catching. But the highlight on this poster of course is that our own Kurt Halfyard has the third quote on the poster. Alas, it’s his review quote over at those sons-of-bitches at Twitch Film, but it’s still exciting. Happy Friday all!