Sunday Bookmarks (Feb. 14-20)

 

  • True Grit Cinematographer Roger Deakins Talks About His “Shot of the Year”
    Deakins is a cinematographer’s cinematographer—the type who writes detailed responses on super fans’ discussion boards, sharing technical specs (“a 1K pup [without a lens] and two Tweenies coming through the window”), giving credit when it’s due (“Nancy Haig and I tested a number of blind samples”), and dishing personal advice (“Nothing ventured, nothing gained!”). He isn’t driven by praise—just the desire to tell a great story. “When I read a script, I think about the development of the characters—I don’t really think about the visuals. Generally, when you read a script that Joel and Ethan have written, it seems very obvious what it should look like,” says Deakins, which may make him the only person in Hollywood who finds the notoriously uncommunicative Coen brothers completely transparent.
  • The Art of the False Comparison; or, Why Freddy Got Fingered is Better Than Touch of Evil
    We all know how false comparisons work. Everybody has a number of movies they like that (most, or many) other people don’t. And everybody also has a number of movies they don’t like that (most, or many) other people do. So you just compare films from the first category to films from the second category (even if they have absolutely nothing to do with one another) and watch the outrage pour forth. You can maximize the outrage if you also make sure that the films from the second category are widely-acknowledged classics. (I realize that Armond White kind of does this with his annual “Better Than” list, though he confines it to new movies.)
  • Video Game Trailers are playing hardball
    In a bid to give movie trailers a run for their money, Techland, the creators of Zombie video-game Dead Island assemble something mighty impressive. Not quite the 28 Weeks Later Opening, but it certainly worth a look to see why all the game-geek and web buzz was so ubitquitous last week.
  • Editing out The Bible for a Wider Audience
    When you aim to please everyone, you probably will please no one. Producers, director and the studio trying to capture both the Blind Side / Passion of the Christ audience as well as secular families with Soul Surfing.
  • A Festival You DON’T want your film at
    This is the type of Film Festival logic and logistics that you never want to see as a filmmaker!

    See also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zf6f6cIKvCQ&hd=1

    The link goes to 14 minute VIDEO of the 2010 ‘mix-up’ by the Swansea Film Festival which outlines just how frustrating festivals can be to the filmmakers whose films are there to be celebrated; in fact this video could be an outtake or extra scene from the documentary on lower-tier film festival circuit, Official Rejection.

  • The real director of the Room? Not Tommy Wiseau
    Although Tommy Wiseau’s name is synonymous with The Room, having written, directed, produced, and starred in his cult tragicomedy like a latter-day Orson Welles with an ass fetish, filmmaker Sandy Schklair has now come forward demanding that he be the one recognized as directing one of the worst movies of all time. In an upcoming interview with Entertainment Weekly, Schklair reportedly says that he was initially hired as a script supervisor, but his responsibilities quickly expanded as it became clear that Wiseau was too busy acting and, presumably, lighting candles to answer questions regarding his dialogue or directions, so it fell to Schklair to step in and call the shots.

 
 

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Recent Bookmarks [Jan/Feb]

 

  • Star Wars Fan Made Documentary
    I’ve seen a lot of Star Wars documentaries in my day; and professional or otherwise, this is probably the best one I’ve ever seen. Granted I don’t watch a lot of “making of” stuff these days, but I can’t recall one that’s put together in this way. If you’re the slightest of Star Wars fans, stop what you’re doing right now and give this a look. I’ve already been hooked for hours and there is plenty more to go!
  • In Defense of Michael Mann’s Collateral
    A few film directors end up becoming masters of specific subjects. Michael Mann is the Hollywood Epic Techno-Crime expert. Did he grow up with it? Did he research it? Even though Mann has made good films in other genres (The Last of the Mohicans and specially The Insider), it is in his crime stories that we witness such a level of detail that we never question their realism. The impact of his characters on us is stronger; they spring from a part of real life that most of us have never been in contact with. Mann knows the precise block of the prison where they met, what their aliases are, what crimes their rap sheets include, and what dark and isolated places under which bridges they plan their schemes.
  • 20 Arnold Schwarzenegger Movies That Need Sequels
    He’ll be back…
  • Grading the Movie Studio Logo Openers – Part I: The Big Boys
    Like most movie geeks out there, I get giddy at the sight of many a movie studio’s animated logo sequence before the start of a film. Although some may say that it’s merely a meaningless logo, those who work in or have studied the graphic arts (or perhaps live in close proximity to someone that does) know that logos are powerful instruments that can build up or tear down companies. Additionally, they each speak volumes about not only the companies themselves but about the products that the companies deliver to you.
  • Affleck to Call Bullshit for Next Film?
    With two critically-acclaimed films under his belt, Ben Affleck has plenty of options for his next directorial gig.
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  • In Defense of The Notebook
    If there is one film from the last decade maligned only for its genre and audience, and nothing else, it is “The Notebook.” I contend that not only is “The Notebook” a good film, it is the single greatest work of romantic fiction of the last decade.
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  • 20 Outstanding Tron: Legacy Fan Artworks
    These are more fun than the actual movie.

 
 
 
 
 

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Recent Bookmarks [Dec/Jan]

 

  • Martin Scorsese: ‘3D is Liberating. Every Shot is Rethinking Cinema’
    As much as I’m skeptical of 3D in general and of the use of 3D in virtually every 3D film I’ve seen, I have to admit I’m pretty curious to see what Scorsese makes of it. it sounds like he’s really interested in figuring out how to use it cinematically: “At the end of a tough day’s filming at Shepperton studios, Scorsese seems genuinely fired up about the possibilities of the 3D format. ‘Every shot is rethinking cinema,’ he enthuses, ‘rethinking narrative – how to tell a story with a picture. Now, I’m not saying we have to keep throwing javelins at the camera, I’m not saying we use it as a gimmick, but it’s liberating. It’s literally a Rubik’s Cube every time you go out to design a shot, and work out a camera move, or a crane move. But it has a beauty to it also. People look like… like moving statues. They move like sculpture, as if sculpture is moving in a way. Like dancers…'”
  • Design Trends of Movie Posters 2010
    Today we will talk about some common features that are typical for movie posters created in 2010. It was a real challenge to mark out some features that would be typical for more than 2-3 movies, so you might have your own opinion and we would be more than glad to hear it!
  • Trent Reznor Talks Scoring David Fincher’s ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’
    After scoring Fincher’s “The Social Network,” the collaboration between the director and NIN frontman, Trent Reznor, continues for Fincher’s remake of Dragon Tattoo.
  • Joel and Ethan Coen pick Favorite Westerns
    Top Five list of The Coens’ favorite western films of all time.
  • American Grievers, Part Two: THE FOUNTAIN
    What makes The Fountain such a classic “American Griever” saga is that Jackman’s blindness to Weisz herself, seeing only her dying; she’s seen the light and Jackman only sees the shade.
  • The Mystique of Robert De Niro
    Robert DeNiro will receive the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award at this year’s Golden Globe ceremony. His work started off as journeyman and became that of a legend. But what happened in the past ten years?
  • True Grit (Outlaw Vern)
    A comparative look at the new Coen Brothers adaptation of True Grit and the original along with Portis’ novel.
  • Is Black Swan, Darren Aronofsky’s tawdry thriller, a work of camp?
    In case you haven’t heard, it’s a comedy. Or, at any rate, a movie that frequently invites laughter. Its pitch is theatrical, its style exaggerated, its general tenor absurd—in other words, as more than a few reviewers have noted, it could be said to exhibit the hallmarks of camp.
  • What if Stanley Kubrick directed Iron Man?
    A neat little set of posters designed to look like Kubrick’s classic films but with an Iran Man twist.

 

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Bookmarks for Mid August

  • When should a director stop messing with a movie?
    “There are many kinds of re-cuts, created for different reasons, under different circumstances. Whether you consider a second or third or fourth cut valid (or superior) to the first depends on what you liked or disliked about the first cut, and the circumstances that produced that first cut, and what you think was gained or lost in revision.”
  • Lock & Load (Video)
    A video montage-essay on Cinema’s fetish with guns (mostly America, but look for a lot of Johnnie To and John Woo in there too.)
  • Mit Out Sound, Mit Out Solution
    Guy Maddin on Josef von Sternberg: “With this mild mea culpa, von Sternberg was done turning out his pockets. Every interview he did after that, until his death just a few days before Christmas of 1969, was a variation on the theme of “I could tell you the secret of my genius, but upon reflection, I prefer it remain a mystery for the ages.” He’s left it for us to work out, that dumpy, dapper rapscallion, but I can hardly blame him. A mystery as insoluble as this is a gift nearly as great as the films themselves.”
  • ‘Scott Pilgrim’ Versus Itself
    “I don’t want to be the guy arguing that a movie adaptation of a comic book doesn’t do justice to the original comic. I especially don’t want to be the one doing that about Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World, because there have already been dark accusations about it being too fanboyish, and I am most definitely a fanboy for Scott Pilgrim the comic book. But the little things that bug me about the movie all ultimately feed into one big complaint: the wonderful treatment of female characters in the comic book gets lost in the transition to the big screen. It’s what happens when you make a big action-filled summer film. But it’s not good that this requires the female characters and their particular relationships to be swept under the rug. ”
  • Half a Century of Making Cars Into Stars
    “There was KITT, the modified Pontiac Firebird Trans Am that protected and talked to David Hasselhoff in the 1980s television series “Knight Rider.” There was the rebuilt and countrified 1921 jalopy that Jed Clampett drove — with Granny in a rocking chair behind him — from the Ozarks to Hollywood in the 1960s series “The Beverly Hillbillies.” And most notably there was the 1955 Lincoln Futura with the bubble top that Mr. Barris and his crew chopped and stretched into a sinister-looking shiny black-and-red crime fighting machine called the Batmobile “In the hall of fame of car customizers, George Barris is No. 1,””
  • Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet on Blu-Ray (U.K)
    “I hesitate to use the word ‘surreal’, because it has become so dulled by overuse as to become almost meaningless, but if there was an animated work that warranted such a label, it is this one. Be warned though – the drug-inspired and often highly sexualised designs complete with images of bare-breasted aliens will probably deter the more Victorian-minded from presenting this to their pre-teens as a Disney substitute. This is definitely one to be filed under the category of “adult art animation”.”

 

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Bookmarks for Early August

  • “The film we had imagined”, or: Anna and Jean-Luc Go To the Movies
    An exploration of the trope of fllmgoing within films, centering on the Passion de Jeanne d’Arc quotation in Vivre sa vie. “In this case, Nana’s response to Jeanne’s tears is, of course, tears of her own […] But this sequence also has other curious and sympathetic qualities. […] The off-centre, often literally decapitating framing that characterises passages of Dreyer’s film, is also paralleled by Godard’s. This suggests that we can read this sequence as both homage and an act of identification by the director. […] These are a series of connections and possibilities that deepen if one has an intimate knowledge of Godard’s cinema and Dreyer’s film. So the quotation of this particular mode of framing refers to other moments in Dreyer’s film and, specifically, the points it makes about Jeanne’s existential and spatial – she is separated, out of place, often framed alone – plight.”
  • Put Julia Roberts On Hold: Seven Big-Name Movies That Have Yet to Reach Theaters or DVD
    Plenty of films don’t ever see a theatrical release, but it’s rare in this day and age for something not even get released on home video in the U.S., especially if it stars Julia Roberts or Jim Carrey. With issues both economic and otherwise, there’s a growing collection of films gathering dust
  • The Nic Cage Factor
    Cage’s oddly unhinged energy and cadence made most of his early film appearances in the mid- to late ’80s unforgettable. But instead of sticking to modest or interesting projects, Cage, after winning his Oscar for Leaving Las Vegas, embraced an action star future with Con Air, and since then his work has been patchy at best. Here are his 5 best reviewed films, 5 most underrated and 5 worst.
  • Arts and Leisure Preview – ‘Inception’ Criticism Raises Questions for Critics
    A.O. Scott takes a step back and looks at the frenzied reaction and re-reaction to Inception in the days before (!) its release. A bit of a commentary on the insane speed of reactionaryness in internet-culture criticism.
  • Top 10 Movies That Mess with Your Mind
    With Inception out there gnawing away at everyone’s conscious (and possibly subconscious), TIME magazine has put together a list of film that are sometimes tough to wrap your head around. From Last Year at Marienbad to pi, here are ten films that will mess with your head.
  • Interview: Filmmaker Vincenzo Natali | KPBS.org
    The Canadian director of “Splice” talks about the origin of his story, science, what scared him as a kid and his next project, the much anticipated adaptation of William Gibson’s “Neuromancer.”
  • Creepshow 2 is Better than the Original
    A simple case of wrong. But worth a look just to comment with the correct answer.

 

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Bookmarks for July 1-4

  • The Anosognosic’s Dilemma: Something’s Wrong but You’ll Never Know What it Is.
    Errol Morris takes you through the literal and metaphorical ins and outs and whathaveyous of the strange condition of Anosognosia: From Donald Rumsfeld to Woodrow Wilson, to Lemon Juice induced ‘invisibility’ in bank robbers: “If Wheeler was too stupid to be a bank robber, perhaps he was also too stupid to know that he was too stupid to be a bank robber — that is, his stupidity protected him from an awareness of his own stupidity.” A wonderful Mega-Morris post to rival the Crimean War Cannon Ball Photos, In FIVE Parts!
  • Agora: the “Reel” vs. the “Real” Hypatia
    A look at how history was molded into narrative with Amenebar’s AGORA – “Bravo! The movie managed to get both versions of the story as told by Damascius in his Life of Isadore. The student wasn’t Orestes (I’ll talk about all the characters in a later post), but the sentiment was real. Damascius reports that after a student professed his love for her, Hypatia showed him her bloody menstrual rag and said, “This is what you really love, my young man, but you do not love beauty for its own sake.”” – In THREE Parts.
  • The Great Directors: David Lynch Segment
    In a snippet of video interview with Angela Ismailos, David Lynch talks about the perceived failure of his blockbuster version of Dune, and how it liberated him to do Blue Velvet.
  • The Carleton Cinema Reborn!
    “For fans of art-house cinema and independent film, the Carlton was often the one venue at which to catch an extended run of a first-run feature that might otherwise be out of theatres in a week. Canadian filmmakers such as Ron Mann and Atom Egoyan claimed it as the birthplace of their careers with an attempt to save the theatre several years ago, though the facilities had already fallen into disrepair. Members of Toronto’s cinema community expressed their outrage at the closing via social media, though critics like The Toronto Star’s Peter Howell bemoaned their “crocodile tears.” It seemed that the Carlton’s closure was just another example of Toronto’s cultural gentrification and the hypocrisy of its supporters in a year that had also seen the loss of another beloved yet unprofitable institution, Pages Bookstore. “
  • Writer Details the SUPERMAN Movie That Never Came To Be
    “The intent was to leapfrog over Superman III and especially IV, and return the series to the high mark achieved in 1 and 2,” Bates told Newsarama. “[It was] our desire to do a fully developed, balls-out science fiction story pitting Superman and Brainiac against each other mano a mano.”
  • Chris Doyle Used to Expose Himself from the Set of Chungking Express, According to Bill Murray“Wait, really? Doyle did indeed live in an apartment looking out over Hong Kong’s Central-Mid-Levels escalator—famously, it was his apartment that Wong used as the abode of the depressed cop played by Tony Leung in Chungking Express. You get a great view of Doyle’s/Cop 663’s apartment, and a bit of the escalator…”
  • Entrance Romance – NOWNESS (Video)
    A short and wonderful fashion video that showcases the super-slow motion used in both The Fall and Antichrist. Here, dog licking, flaming hairspray and smashing beer bottles over models head.

 

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Bookmarks for June 18-25

  • A Heartfelt Obituary for Canadian indie actress Tracy Wright
    (Tracy Wright died June 22 after a battle with pancreatic cancer.) “Canada’s never been one for respecting artists, especially women over 30. It was hard to watch Tracy getting older. Older, ha! She was in her 40s. But year by year it was harder for her to find good work, despite being the best of the best. At times she seemed at a loss as to what to do. Of course, she was a brilliant actor and should have been acting constantly.”
  • Anton Corbijn photoblogs The American
    Title says it all, enjoy some great behind the scenes photography by a great photographer.
  • How Does Inception’s Overly Detailed Chalkboard Compare to Other Overly Detailed Chalkboards?
    The Vulture gives a list of ‘overblown chalk board’ scenes in Movies and unforgivably leaves out A SERIOUS MAN. WTF? Either way, it’s an unconventional topic around a list, that gets at one of those amusing movie cliches. Who draws these damn things and how long does it take?
  • MUBI on “The Illusionist”
    “In the end, this is a Chomet film, as it had to be. Fans of Chomet will love it, and fans of both Chomet and Tati (which I confess to being) will really love it. Those who were able to resist the charm of Chomet’s previous feature may not be so pleased, although the new film represents an advance in terms of use of colour: The Triplets of Belleville achieved its nostalgic feel partly by useing a restricted palette of mucus-hues intended to evoke sepia-tone, whereas The Illusionist is as radiantly rich as Tati’s own movies, without losing any sense of period.”
  • Film Freak Central Interviews Vincenzo Natali
    “Indeed, anyone who’s seen the trailers for Natali’s latest, the Frankenstein-ian family drama Splice, is certain to be surprised by what the final product has in store. You didn’t see that one comin’, did ya? I know I didn’t. Natali’s career has taken an appropriately unpredictable trajectory: he began work as a storyboard artist for Saturday morning cartoons and later went on to direct a popular little sci-fi/horror picture called Cube. In between the low-budget flicks that followed, he helmed a segment of the anthology film Paris, je t’aime, as well as a documentary about Terry Gilliam for the Tideland DVD.”
  • Indie Wire Interviews Tilda Swinton (Video)
    “Tilda Swinton is a brainy actress who swings easily from passion indie projects (The Deep End, Julia and the upcoming I Am Love) to studio fare, from arch-villains to objects of desire, and from mother in the Scottish highlands to glamourous globe-trotting movie star. ”

 

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Bookmarks for June 10

 

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Bookmarks for May 28-31

  • Culture Warrior: This is Not a Banksy
    Thought-provoking piece on art, the art documentary, and specifically the Banksy film Exit Through the Gift Shop.
  • When Is a Musical Not a Musical?
    I think Rosenbaum hits the nail on the head here with Godard – “But Godard’s critical influence on me and many others has stemmed in part from things he hasn’t been able to do as a director. Relative to his own models, he failed to make thrillers out of Breathless and Band of Outsiders, a war film of Les carabiniers, a melodrama of Contempt, science fiction of Alphaville and Anticipation (from the anthology film The Oldest Profession), or even Shakespeare of King Lear. Part of this failure is inadvertent, part deliberate and purposeful: an ability to take things apart and understand how they function isn’t always matched by an ability to put them back together again.” If you can put up with failure for the sake of experimentation (and somewhat solipsistic experimentation at that), you’ll like Godard. If you can’t, you won’t. It is pretty much that simple.
  • Observations on film art : Metropolis unbound
    A great piece from David Bordwell about the Metropolis restoration. He discusses the shifts and additions to the narrative due to the new footage, then looks specifically at Lang’s use of cinematic space to drive both narrative and theme rather than relying on intertitles.
  • The overactors – Mad, bad, and dangerous to the scenery
    “…even such self-aggrandising performances are still usually tuned to the key of supposed psychological realism; no matter how obvious or obnoxious, the actor is resolutely “in character” and therefore, somehow, inherently authentic. It seemingly matters little that Method’s furrowed-brow mumbling is, in its own way, as stylized as a kabuki mask. ”
  • Malick, Coppola could lead strong crop at Venice (or Toronto) for 2010
    Here is hoping for Tree of Life for Tiff, but ather potentials on the fall festival circuit include Sofia Coppola’s Somewhere, Clint Eastwood’s Hereafter, Tom Hooper’s The King’s Speech, Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan, Anton Corbijn’s The American, Julian Schnabel’s Miral, Danny Boyle’s 127 Hours, John Cameron Mitchell’s Rabbit Hole, Bruce Robinson’s The Rum Diary, Robert Rodriguez’s Machete and Julie Taymor’s The Tempest. Screendaily mentions many, many more.
  • 15 Grossly Misleading Movie Posters
    Movies are both an art form and a business, so while it’s the artist’s vision that dictates the direction, it is sadly entirely up to clean shaven men with business degrees to decide how to sell it. And while we understand it’s their job to twist the truth to maximize a movie’s appeal, sometimes they go completely insane and just start making shit up. Occasionally, they hit on a better idea than the movie ever did…

 

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Bookmarks for May 17-19

  • Stephen Frears and ‘Tamara Drewe’ eschews English fixation on class system
    Stephen Frears banters and spars with the Cannes International Media: “Well, I’ll defend ambiguity til I die … and if I said I were in favor of telling the truth, I’d be lying.” And so the bantering went back and forth.
  • Ridley Me This: Why Isn’t Sir Scott as Great as You Tell Me He Is?
    “I saw Ridley Scott’s tired Robin Hood this past weekend and I was underwhelmed. It’s not a bad movie. Scott rarely makes bad films, just frequently uninspired ones.”
  • Top 10 Underrated Sci-Fi Stories Before 1864
    “The science fiction genre developed over the latter half of the 19th century with the works of Jules Verne and, subsequently, H.G. Wells. For the sake of a clear cut off date for this list, however, we shall say the cut off date for novels not to be influenced by these fathers of the genre is 1864, the year in which Verne published “A Journey to the Center of the Earth.” These are the classic science fiction novels that preceded the fathers of the genre that are commonly overlooked by modern audiences.”
  • The Secrets of Marienbad
    “Everyone is of course familiar with Alain Resnais’s cult film, written by Alain Robbe-Grillet and made just fifty years ago, L’Année dernière à Marienbad (Last Year at Marienbad). It happened that a young actress named Françoise Spira was on the set during the shooting of the film. She didn’t play the lead role … She didn’t even have one of these real supporting roles that leave you with the memory of a few unforgettable scenes. But in any case, she was there from the beginning of the shoot to the end, with her Super 8 without sound, and she filmed the film, capturing its most magical instants — Resnais’s youthful laughter, Seyrig’s delightful caprices, the somber and childlike charm of Albertazzi. In short, off in her little corner and without shouting from the rooftops, she produced the “making of” of the most formal, glacial and, actually, unerring, unwavering film in the history of contemporary cinema. But Françoise Spira committed suicide. Her ‘making of’ was lost with her.”
  • A Roger Ebert Tribute
    “I guess the biggest criticism I have of Roger is that his reviews are often too easy on films, except for my films of course–he could never be too easy on them–but, the guy loves films so much that it’s almost contagious. He’s open, he’s smart, he’s thoughtful, he’s always very clear, and he’s got a really good heart and–like I said–he’s really funny, which is hard to do as a writer. He manages to make you think critically without making it seem like homework. God knows the world needs more people thinking critically these days about a lot of things. ”
  • Malick, Coppola could lead strong crop at Venice (or Toronto) for 2010
    Here is hoping for Tree of Life for Tiff, but ather potentials on the fall festival circuit include Sofia Coppola’s Somewhere, Clint Eastwood’s Hereafter, Tom Hooper’s The King’s Speech, Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan, Anton Corbijn’s The American, Julian Schnabel’s Miral, Danny Boyle’s 127 Hours, John Cameron Mitchell’s Rabbit Hole, Bruce Robinson’s The Rum Diary, Robert Rodriguez’s Machete and Julie Taymor’s The Tempest. Screendaily mentions many, many more.

 

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