Blindspotting: Ride The High Country and Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid

Blindspotting: Ride The High Country and Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid

Though they do it in very different ways, two of Sam Peckinpah other Westerns (Ride The High Country and Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid) provide much stronger and more interesting characters than his oft-hailed The Wild Bunch.

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Blindspotting: The 36th Chamber Of Shaolin and Five Deadly Venoms

Blindspotting: The 36th Chamber Of Shaolin and Five Deadly Venoms

When I think of Kung Fu, I think of desaturated videotape stock, people being cut out of the frame and halting English dubbed in an attempt to match the characters’ mouths. Oh, and enough whooshing and whacking sounds to make a foley artist break into a sweat.

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Blind Spot: Full Metal Jacket

Going into this film, I’d heard that it breaks cleanly into two parts, and that most people vastly prefer the first part. Coming out of it, the first statement is self-evident, but I ended up liking both parts quite a lot. The first part is set at Marine boot camp, with a hard-nosed drill sergeant putting a group of raw recruits through the wringer. The second...

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Blindspotting: West Side Story and 42nd Street

. One of the reasons why you may not often hear as much about plot or character when discussing musicals is that they tend to use age old stories at their core. More often than not it’s all about those tunes and performances, so those familiar tales are used to provide a familiar landscape from which to launch the song and dance routines. As I sat down to...

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Blindspotting in 2014

. Let’s review…This whole idea behind the Blind Spot series (kicked off 2 years ago by top notch Toronto blogger/writer dudes James McNally and Ryan McNeil) is solely meant to poke and prod slackards like myself into finally getting around to those films that we not only feel are classics we should see, but ones we really want to see. Whether the...

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Blindspotting: Mr. Smith Goes To Washington and The Grapes Of Wrath

. My last Blind Spot of 2013 (before picking my 2014 ones) – dedicated to the gents of MAMO.   As pre-WWII statements of America, Mr Smith Goes To Washington and The Grapes Of Wrath both warn against allowing the powerful elite control over the little common man – a call to arms often heard on the cinematic landscape and relevant to...

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Blindspotting: Phantom Of The Opera and Creature From The Black Lagoon

. Yes, this would have made more sense in October. Conspiring forces and all that…   It’s odd to think that two vastly different films with 30 years between them could both be lumped together under the same generic genre banner. But that’s what happens when you start classifying anything old as “classic” – like, for...

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Blindspotting: Lost Weekend and Deliverance

. When I chose Lost Weekend and Deliverance as a Blindspot pair, I did it with a vague idea of a common theme of men overcoming major obstacles. As it turns out, the biggest obstacle each central character faces and needs to overcome is staring right back at him in the mirror. That’s not to say there aren’t a few other hindrances in their way...

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Blindspotting: A Star Is Born and Cabaret

. I‘ve likely said a lot of obvious things in my time, but I expect ranking high on that list would be saying something like “Geez, that Judy Garland can sing, eh?”. But I wonder how obvious that is these days? Sure, everyone knows that Judy’s version of “Somewhere Over The Rainbow” from The Wizard Of Oz is a classic piece of...

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Blindspotting: In The Heat Of The Night and Absence Of Malice

. As “issues” movies go, In The Heat Of The Night ranks as one of the big ones. It may not have been the first of its kind, but it solidifies its place in film history by crafting moments of subtlety and nuance while also wearing its central issue proudly on its sleeve and never resorting to being maudlin. Every movie since its release that waves a...

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