Cinecast Episode 501 – Irrelevantly Relevant

We thought we were done. You thought we were done. And we are. But we got a little homesick for some good ol’ fashioned Cinecast magic. And today’s films up for discussion could not have scratched that itch any better. It’s been close to ten months since the boys last spoke and so naturally we need to take some time to play catch-up with our cinematic lives over that time. 2017 stand outs, what’s been on the radar for 2018 and so forth. And then we get into full SPOILER discussions of Boots Riley’s magnetic Sorry to Bother You as well as Tom Cruise’s stunt extravaganzza, Mission: Impossible – Fallout. Kurt, once again, visited Montreal for the always entertaining “Fantasia Film Festival” while Andrew stayed home and watch Kevin Costner on the small screen. The Cinecast is resurrected one more time and there’s a lot to catch up on here folks, so let’s get to it…

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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After the Credits Special Episode: This is Not the End!

While it’s true that RowThree.com is going static after a decade of updates, a milestone by any measure, we’re not done!

After the Credits has a new home and we’re happy to announce that going forward, you can find new episodes of the podcast at atcpod.ca beginning with the December preview which will drop next week followed by some coverage from the Whistler Film Festival.

Come January, we’ll be re-launching Girls on Pop and Dale has been cooking up a side-show for a few months that we’re hoping to launch in the very near future – all this to say that we’re not going anywhere!

For the most part, you won’t need to make any changes to your feed but if you don’t see fresh content popping up before November 30th, or to prevent missing any awesomeness, update your feed to http://atcpod.ca/feed/.

Cinecast Episode 500 – You’re On Your Own From Here…

Ten damn years! The Cinecast has been around for ten years totaling (more than) 500 episodes. We’ve argued over, bickered about, tongue-bathed, laughed about and quoted movies for close to 2000 recorded hours. We’ve made loads of new friends, lost loved ones, earned degrees, visited other continents, entered the covenant of marriage, written books, attended countless festivals, interviewed celebrities and even starred in a couple of low budget films in that time. And the amount of alcohol consumed… I don’t even want to think about it. We have some of the most devoted listeners in podcasting and I have to believe we’re in the running for most hours recorded of one series in the history of podcasting at this point. Therefore, of course we have a good hour of reminiscing and say thanks to a few important folks. But as we hit this momentous milestone we, for the most part, treat it like any other episode except for one big in-house announcement. We have three theatrical reviews: Thor: Ragnorak, The Killing of a Sacred Deer and Murder on the Orient Express. Then we take some time to look back at the year that is 2017 which of course includes a top five list. We also fulfill on a years-old promise (or at least half of it) with a retro-review of Tyrannosaur in return for a generous donation from listener Len Fearnside.

This is The Cinecast 500. Yes, have some.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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Television Trends – Who Decides What’s Hot and What’s Not?

Trends are a funny a thing. Whether you realize it or not, they are constantly forming right in front of your eyes and what’s more, some are more easily explained than others. In terms of the fashion industry, for example, there are many well-known trendsetters who only need to be seen holding a garment of interest before every man and their dog are wearing the item in question. However, when it comes to film and in particular television, the forming of trends is much more complex, especially with the emergence of on demand streaming platforms such as Hulu and Netflix.

IMAGE SOURCE: Pixabay

TV Is Now Borrowing From The Big Screen More Than Ever

In the US, box office takings for August 2017 totaled $625m according to the BBC, which indicates a 35% decrease when compared the same month last year. Whilst much of this is down to a perceived lack of high quality content, it’s also due to the fact that television series are borrowing the best elements and themes from the cinema and then simply doing a better job of incorporating them into their own programming. Many of the most popular current themes of programming within the television industry first found success on the big screen. Take the superhero genre for example – shows such as Jessica Jones, Daredevil and The Flash have enjoyed considerable success on the small screen and yet, it’s arguable that these shows would have never come to fruition had it not been for the success of flagship franchises such as X-Men and The Avengers on the big screen. Furthermore, a recent report from USA Today estimates that around 1 in 8 Marvel TV/Netflix show watchers are new to the superhero genre. All of this serves to show that while our interest in the superhero genre was rekindled by the cinema, it has been undoubtedly further whetted by television.

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Familiarity Breeds…Enjoyment?

While there are many different names for it, the familiarity principle or mere-exposure effect within social psychology could also go some way to explain how trends in television are set. The theory has it that an individual will develop a preference for something for no other reason than the fact that they are already familiar with it, whether this be on a conscious or unconscious basis. Take for example the iconic figure of Elvis Presley, his figure at Las Vegas combined with slot games have made for one of the most popular places to gamble. All you need is the comfort that there is a big brand behind the title and you will automatically be drawn to it, says researcher Dr Mark Griffiths. Author Margrethe Bruun Vaage’s Amazon bestseller The Antihero in American Television argues that the feeling of “familiarity is pleasurable” and that “television series activate mental mechanisms similar to those activated by friendship in real life.” In other words, viewers develop a shared bond between themselves and the characters on screen and the familiarity principle allows them to maintain this sympathetic attitude once it has been initially established.
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After the Credits Episode 220: November Preview

Summer love

We missed October due to festival and scheduling craziness but I’d like to think we more than made up for it with a couple of bonus episodes from VIFF.

The crew is, however, reunited this month as Colleen, Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd) look ahead at November which is a mishmash of everything from action adventure (Thor: Ragnarok) and family fare (Coco) to awards hopefuls (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri).

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Cinecast Episode 499 – Automat

Blade Runner 2049 fixes some things about the original 1982 film. This is exactly why Andrew is happy and why Kurt is pissed off. Also, is it basically a remake in disguise? The boys dissect. Up next, what if The Coen Brothers and Quentin Tarantino were married and their child was a gore hound? You’d have S. Craig Zahler and Brawl in Cell Block 99 would be his sophomore effort.

Kurt is back from Sitges and we get a little taste of that experience at the beginning of the show. Towards the end of the episode, Andrew has been turning off his brain with mostly junk cinema while Kurt saw his favorite film of the year. Have a listen and make your case/point in the comments below.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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After the Credits Episode 219: VIFF Dispatch #3

The Vancouver International Film Festival is back for another year and with it, our semi-regular VIFF dispatches.

We’re back for our third update and final update from the festival. I’m (Letterboxd) joined by festival correspondent and friend of the podcast Mr. Bill Harris (Twitter), whom you can regularly find on The Green Screen of Death podcast along with Lisa, who joins us for another year as we count down our favourite picks from the festival.

After the Credits Episode 218: VIFF Dispatch #2

The Vancouver International Film Festival is back for another year and with it, our semi-regular VIFF dispatches.

We’re back for our second update from the festival and once again, I’m (Letterboxd) joined by festival correspondent and friend of the podcast Mr. Bill Harris (Twitter), whom you can regularly find on The Green Screen of Death podcast.

After the Credits Episode 217: VIFF Dispatch #1

The Vancouver International Film Festival is back for another year and with it, our semi-regular VIFF dispatches.

For our first check-in from the festival, I’m (Letterboxd) joined by festival correspondent and friend of the podcast Mr. Bill Harris (Twitter), whom you can regularly find on The Green Screen of Death podcast. Bill is nearly 3 weeks and 2 festivals into his current run and he’s got some great coverage of the first half of the festival including insights into some of the most lauded movies of the year so far. I chime in with the occasional insight because frankly, I simply haven’t seen as many movies.

We’ll be back with another dispatch from the fest in a day or two but for now, check out our overview of the first 10 days of VIFF.

Review: Kingsman: The Golden Circle

Director: Matthew Vaughn
Writers: Jane Goldman, Matthew Vaughn
Producers: Adam Bohling, David Reid, Matthew Vaughn
Starring: Taron Egerton, Mark Strong, Julianne Moore, Pedro Pascal, Hanna Alström, Colin Firth, Channing Tatum, Halle Berry, Jeff Bridges
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 141 min.

 

 

My original posting of this review can be found on LetterBoxd

 


The general attitude for making a sequel is “more” and Kingsman: The Golden Circle follows that straight to its demise. There’s more action, more style, more CGI, more characters, and it all drowns whatever this movie could have been, turning it into a barely tolerable assault on the senses that’s all confection and nothing more. The first Kingsman movie was a breath of fresh air, bringing a subversive tongue in cheek edge to the current glut of franchise movies that are so tired and repetitive, with each one feeling like an imitation of everything else. Of course, making a sequel to such a film creates the dilemma of how you can keep things consistent while still bringing that level of creativity to the table. Matthew Vaughn and company clearly weren’t up to the task, and their solution was apparently just to overwhelm this beast (running almost two and a half hours for god knows why) by throwing as much at the screen as they possibly could.

To be fair, The Golden Circle isn’t all bad. As far as the style and sense of humor goes, it does still feel unique among the rest of the pack of franchises out here, even if it can’t achieve the level of success in either of those departments that the first film did, particularly in the case of the comedy as a lot of the jokes in this one fall very flat. The action is still incredibly fun and inventive, although again they definitely do overdo it and nothing can compare to the incredible church fight in the film’s predecessor. Perhaps its finest asset though is the charm of leading man Taron Egerton. As is the case with the other compliments I can give the film, this does come with a caveat. A large part of the appeal of the first film was watching Egerton’s Eggsy on his Pygmalion arc from street thug to super spy, and inevitably we don’t get to enjoy any of that this time around since he starts the film off already established as a Kingsman. At the same time, it allows us to enjoy the charm of Egerton fully embracing that role from start to finish, and there’s plenty of fun there.

The counter point to that, unfortunately, is the incredibly misguided decision to bring back Colin Firth’s Harry. I won’t spoil how they justify this return in the context of the film, suffice it to say that the direction/explanation they take with it is unbelievably disappointing and retroactively damages one of the things that made the first film so great. It’s just one example of how messy and awkwardly written The Golden Circle is. Julianne Moore’s villain is completely isolated, removed from the action, and doesn’t have any interaction with the main cast until the very end for an incredibly brief period of time. It’s such a shame when you compare it to how great the first film handled Samuel L. Jackson’s memorable villain. It wouldn’t be hard to forget that Moore was even in this, and she’s the big baddie!
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Cinecast Episode 498 – Completionist

Thanks for dropping by for another edition of The RowThree Cinecast; inching ever closer to the big Quincentenary episode. These week we play it fast and loose, as does director Doug Liman tend to do with the subject of this week’s main topic, American Made. It ain’t perfect or perhaps even all that memorable, but it sure is a fun way to spend a rainy fall afternoon. Not much time to get to anything else but the boys do each have a pair for The Watch List – well, Andrew has a “Listen List” this week with a new podcast mention. Kurt visits a couple of Cinecast favorites with David Mamet and Denis Villeneuve. Andrew visits one of the six, yes six(!), films of the year to feature a John Denver song in Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire. It’s not a whole lot to go on, but we certainly get some mileage out of it.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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