Contest: Win Tickets To See The Gambler! [Vancouver]

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Rupert Wyatt’s The Gambler opens in theatres on December 25 and we’ve got 5 double passes and some promo items to give away for the advance screening on December 22, 7:00pm at Scotiabank Theatre.

Jim Bennett (Academy Award®-nominee Mark Wahlberg) is a risk taker. Both an English professor and a high-stakes gambler, Bennett bets it all when he borrows from a gangster (Michael Kenneth Williams) and offers his own life as collateral. Always one step ahead, Bennett pits his creditor against the operator of a gambling ring (Alvin Ing) and leaves his dysfunctional relationship with his wealthy mother (Academy Award®-winner Jessica Lange) in his wake. He plays both sides, immersing himself in an illicit, underground world while garnering the attention of Frank (John Goodman), a loan shark with a paternal interest in Bennett’s future. As his relationship with a student (Brie Larson) deepens, Bennett must take the ultimate risk for a second chance…

Jim Bennett (Academy Award®-nominee Mark Wahlberg) is a risk taker and high-stakes gambler who is very familiar with games of chance. For your chance to win, just identify the 4 popular casino games below, and email us your answers before midnight PST on Friday, December 19! Winners will be chosen from all entries on December 20, 2014.

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After the Credits Episode 164: Whistler Film Festvial Wrap

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Four days of eating, drinking and movie watching are over and so is the Whistler Film Festival.

Just before saying goodbye to the village for another year, Colleen (adead.horse), Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd) were joined by The Green Screen of Death podcast co-hosts Adrian Charlie (twitter) and Bill Harris (twitter) to count down both the good and bad of the festival.

The guys also recorded their own Whistler wrap show which you can download or stream.

Apparently, we were too loud for the library.

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WFF 2014 Review: I Put A Hit on You

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Your romantic evening doesn’t go as you expected. Actually, it ends in an argument and you storming out of the restaurant. You go home, get blitzed and in a moment of alcohol induced anger, you put a hit on your ex only to wake up hours later, figure out what you’ve done, instantly regret it and then head over to his place to save his life.

It doesn’t sound like much of a plot but the crowd funding video for Dane Clark and Linsey Stewart’s I Put a Hit on You went viral, proof that perhaps this concept of doing stuff you regret while drunk is something a lot of people have experienced though I expect the Craigslist market for hitmen is rather limited.

The concept for Clark and Stewart’s movie is perfect for a single location shoot. Once the set-up is out of the way, it takes all of 10 minutes, I Put a Hit on You moves to Ray’s apartment and pretty much stays there as Ray (Aaron Ashmore) and Harper (Sara Canning) try to sort out the mess she has created. While trying to figure out how to survive the night, the pair also delve into their relationship problems in a dramedy that mostly works.

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WFF 2014 Review: After the Ball

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We all have kryptonite. I have more kryptonite than most. If the movie involves dancing, cheerleading, drumlines, high school drama, Shakespeare, modern interpretations of Shakespeare, or re-telling fairy tales, I’ve probably seen it or want to see it. I simply can’t help myself. This is my candy and I love to bite into a new bar. Rarely is that new bar completely fulfilling. Even rarer, like, white elephant rare, is when that piece of candy happens to be Canadian. I’m pretty sure the last one was How She Move (review) and that was a long, long time ago.

What first caught my attention about After the Ball is director Sean Garrity. A few years ago Garrity really impressed with a great little thriller titled Blood Pressure so when I saw his name attached, I didn’t look any further. I knew I had to see this. Imagine my surprise when I read the description to find that After the Ball is basically Cinderella meets “Twelfth Night” set in the fashion industry.

Portia Doubleday stars as Kate, a talented fashion grad who is trying to get a job in the world of haute couture. She’s talented but her family name is problematic. Her father owns a consumer friendly fashion line that, in the past, has been known to steal couture designs and re-package them for the mall crowd. Defeated, Kate returns home and decides, against her initial floundering, to take on a job at the family business. She squares off against her terrible step mother and two despicable (and dumb) step sisters, gets fired, returns in disguise and falls in love with the in house shoe designer – played by, no less, Marc-André Grondin.

Jackpot.

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WFF 2014 Review: A Most Violent Year

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Truth be told: if you haven’t seen a J.C. Chandor movie, you’re missing out. Like, seriously missing out. That doesn’t however, mean that you should skip A Most Violent Year. Actually, that means that you should see A Most Violent Year as soon as possible and then head back and check out the director’s previous work.

Also written by Chandor, A Most Violent Year sounds like the most boring movie ever about the most dry industry ever. Oscar Isaac plays Abel Morales, the owner of a heating oil company in the early 80s when people, instead of having deals with the electric or gas company for their heating, they negotiated heating oil prices with the providers directly. Life has been good for Morales. He’s risen through the ranks from driver to owner, married a beautiful, smart woman, and he’s just about to close the biggest deal of his life.

But all is not well at Standard Oil: the company is under investigation for fraud, the bank has pulled out of their real estate deal, trucks of oil are being stolen right from Morales’ nose and to make matters worse, now Morales’ seemingly perfect home life is starting to show cracks. It’s definitely a violent year for Morales but not in sense you might imagine.

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After the Credits Episode 162: December Preview

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We can now hang up our hats satisfied that we have provided preview shows for an entire year. Sure, it doesn’t sound like much when you consider the frequency of the other podcasts hosted here at Row Three but it’s a big deal for us so let us revel in it OK?

Colleen (adead.horse), Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd), are a little distracted by the upcoming Whistler Film Festival (a preview podcast will go up either later today or tomorrow) and the fact that post move, I had limited ways in which to see the upcoming movie list, but we muddle through December’s offerings – from the awesome to the less so.

At the top of the show, we also share a few podcasts we’re listening to. Link goodness:

Colleen – Caustic Soda, Horsetrack Hooligans
Dale – Canadaland
Marina – Serial, On the Media, NPR: Planet Money, TLDR

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After the Credits Episode 161: November Preview

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We can almost see the finish line! Two episodes left before we hit a full year of previews!

We recorded this a week earlier than usual and the list of movies was a bit light at the time though as noted by Colleen (adead.horse), Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd), awards season seems to be slow in starting this month but does kick off this with a number of awards bate offerings including the TIFF audience winner, a movie which, shockingly, we are all interested in seeing.

Yes, there is gleeful cheer at the mere thought of the Whister Film Festival which is only a few short weeks away! And we also sing the praises of local coffee shop Roastmastir’s.

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VIFF 2014 Review: Force Majeure

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Relationships can survive through a lot but there are some things that are just too difficult, if not impossible, to get over. In Force Majeure, writer/director Ruben Östlund tackles one of those issues with laser fire accuracy and a cense of humour that comes as a welcome, if unexpected, surprise.

Tomas, Ebba and their two kids are on a family vacation in France. The trip is going well and everyone is having a good time skiing, eating and relaxing. While having breakfast one morning, the family watches as a controlled avalanche quickly approaches the patio where their food has just arrived and rather than slowing down, it looks as though the avalanche is gaining speed and power and that it will take out the patio.

Chaos.

Everyone runs.

Tomas pushes someone out of the way to get to safety while Ebba’s first concern is to protect her children. And then the snow fog settles and everything is all right. People laugh off their near death experiences and Ebba and the kids go back to their breakfast and are soon joined by Tomas.

The event starts to recede from memory until, over dinner later than night, Tomas and Ebba retell the adventure to a friend. Ebba calls Tomas a coward for running off. He claims to remember the events differently. What follows in Force Majeure is nearly 90 minutes of Tomas and Ebba trying to talk their way out of this impasse that has clouded their relationship. They’re constantly arguing, they can’t see eye to eye on anything and their kids are convinced that mom and dad are going to get a divorce. There’s nothing like a near death experience to highlight who we are at our core but also to force us to reconsider and re-examine our relationships.

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