After the Credits Episode 168: Interview with Ruba Nadda

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I‘ve been a fan of Ruba Nadda since I saw Cairo Time a couple of years ago and when the chance to speak to speak with the Canadian director about her new romantic thriller October Gale came up, I jumped at the opportunity.

I really liked October Gale when I saw it at VIFF last year. It’s not the darkest of thrillers but it’s a great story of the hardships of working through loss and features fantastic perfomrances from Patricia Clarkson, Scott Speedman and Tim Roth.

During our chat, Ms. Nadda and I talk about her recent fascination with thrillers, the art of on-screen chemistry and the difficulties, especially in today’s landscape, of romances that simmer just below the surface.

October Gale is currently available on VOD and opens theatrically on Friday, March 6th.

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Welcome to Me Trailer

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I’m finally starting to figure out the appeal of Kristen Wiig and all it took was seeing her in a handful of movies where she plays the same sort of character: likeable but somewhat pathetic individuals who, none the less, manage to be less pathetic at the end than at the beginning of their journey. They’re always a little humerous and Wiig is always great but in Welcome to Me (review), Wiig elevates from great to brilliant.

Welcome to Me is uncomfortable to watch. Wiig’s Alice quite obviously suffers from mental health issues and laughing at her antics is a bit icky but the movie somehow tows the fine line between creepy and funny and I came away with a new sense of awe not only for Wiig but for the rest of the cast, particularly Wes Bentley who hasn’t been memorable in years.

I love this movie.

Welcome to Me opens May 8. Fingers crossed it finds an audience that appreciates the genius.

Contest: Win Tickets to see Hot Tub Time Machine 2! [Vancouver]

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Hot Tub Time Machine 2 opens in theatres on February 20th and we’ve got 4 double passes to give away for the advance screening on February 18 2015, 7:00pm at SilverCity Metropolis.

When Lou finds himself in trouble, Nick and Jacob fire up the hot tub time machine in an attempt to get back to the past. But they inadvertently land in the future. Now they have to alter the future in order to save the past… which is really the present, in the sequel from the same team that brought you the original cult hit.

Hot Tub Time Machine 2 stars Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson, Clark Duke, Adam Scott and Chevy Chase.

As mentioned we have 4 double Advance Screening Passes to give away. If you would like to win the passes let us know in the comments your 4 favorite 80’s songs before midnight PST on Monday, February 16. Winners will be chosen from all entries on February 17, 2015.

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Review: Kingsman: The Secret Service

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Director: Matthew Vaughn (Layer Cake, Stardust, Kick-Ass, X-Men: First Class)
Writer: Jane Goldman, Matthew Vaughn
Producers: Adam Bohling, David Reid, Matthew Vaughn
Starring: Colin Firth, Mark Strong, Jack Davenport, Mark Hamill, Taron Egerton, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Caine, Sofia Boutella
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 129 min.


Spy movies have a tendency to feel constricting and demure. Even with all the action and gadgets of Bond, he always feels so serious and like there’s so little joy in his life. I guess that’s part of the appeal of the new Bond – he’s dark and secretive and the movies are gritty. Enter Matthew Vaughn. He seems to have looked at the genre, decided that it’s too boring and stuffy, gave it the finger and set out to deliver an epically rambunctious spy movie that flies in the face of convention, all the while maintaining most of the irreverence offered up by the source material from bad boy comics creator Mark Millar.

This isn’t the first time Vaughn and writing partner Jane Goldman (worth noting a woman has a hand in adapting a successful comic book property – not the first either) have taken on Millar. We all saw how Kick-Ass turned out; Vaughn and Goldman have proven they can aptly adapt Millar’s storytelling style to the big screen and the results in Kingsman: The Secret Service are a clear indication that Goldman and Vaughn should keep adapting Millar properties because the results tend to be spectacular.

Colin Firth goes action star as Harry Hart, the member of a super secret spy organization known as the Kingsmen. A series of events leads the group on a search of a new member and the current members have to provide a candidate. Hart finds his in his past, a young man who goes by Eggsy, newcomer star-in-the-making Taron Egerton, whose father once saved Hart’s life. What follows is a series of training montages as the recruits vie for the single spot on the spy team while Hart and his agency cronies including Mark Strong as Merlin and Michael Cane as Arthur (see the hilarious theme here?) lead the charge against Valentine, Samuel L. Jackson sporting a lisp (in what seems like one of the longest leads to a joke in a movie in some time), a mad genius who is trying to solve the world’s climate problem.

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After the Credits Episode 166: February Preview

*Equal opportunity oogler

Equal opportunity oogler

We know how it happened but we don’t really know how it happened. How is it already February? In a slight state of shock, Colleen, Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd), get off track on Joan Collins and 80s soaps theme songs but along the way we also manage to look ahead to the movies coming out this month!

Other stuff we talk about:

SPARK FWD festival and conference
– NPR: On the Media – episode with Bob Garfield’s outtakes
– Joan Collins on Graham Norton show (I made a mistake, it’s a different show but still awesome)
– “Fifty Shades of Grey” on Say Wah?!

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Review: The Devil’s Violinist

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Director: Bernard Rose (Immortal Beloved, Ivansxtc, The Kreutzer Sonata, Two Jacks)
Writer: Bernard Rose
Producers: Christian Angermayer, Gabriela Bacher, Rosilyn Heller, Danny Krausz
Starring: David Garrett, Jared Harris, Joely Richardson, Christian McKay, Veronica Ferres, Andrea Deck
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 122 min.


Coming into The Devil’s Violinist, I had little knowledge about the project besides the fact that it was biopic of Niccolò Paganini, a violinist and composer I knew nearly nothing about. I didn’t recognize the handsome dark haired actor portraying Paganini but Jared Harris is certainly a great talent and let’s be frank, when have I ever been known to pass up a costume drama? Never, that’s when.

The Devil’s Violinist isn’t so much a biography as it is a drama about a musician who we know for a fact was a talented violinist and composer, a man who lived a lavish lifestyle and who was rumoured to be associated with the devil. Writer/director Bernard Rose takes a very short list of facts and weaves a story of mystery, intrigue and of a tortured artist who sells his soul to the devil, enjoys everything the world has to offer – from women to drugs – and eventually suffers for it.

If you’re looking for a biography on Paganini, you had best look elsewhere. Rose’s take on the maestro is so frivolously extrapolated that The Devil’s Violinist is far more fiction than anything else. I went reading about Paganini after seeing the movie only to discover that, among other inconsistencies, he suffered from syphilis and was later treated for tuberculosis neither of which was mentioned in the movie. As for his involvement with the devil… the movie does seem to get that part right. One can’t call this any sort of biography which leads to the question: why use Paganini’s name at all? My thought is that it adds intrigue and frankly, it’s a great excuse to fill the movie with spectacular music.

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Trailer: Effie Gray

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Funny how these things happen.

Before last week I’d never heard of John Ruskin and then his name came up in a conversation regarding Mike Leigh’s excellent Mr. Turner and here we are, only a few days later, with a trailer for a movie about Ruskin and his marriage to his young wife, the titular Effie Gray.

Directed by long time British TV director Richard Laxton, Effie Gray is written by the wonderful Emma Thompson who also stars in a supporting role but this is the Dakota Fanning show as the talented young actress stars as Effie opposite Greg Wise’s John Ruskin. Julie Walters, Tom Sturridge and Robbie Coltrane also star.

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Review: Selma

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Director: Ava DuVernay (Middle of Nowhere, The Door)
Writer: Paul Webb
Producers: Cassandra Kulukundis, Todd J. Labarowski, Emanuel Michael
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Wendell Pierce, Lorraine Toussaint, Tom Wilkinson, Giovanni Ribisi
MPAA Rating: PG-13
Running time: 127 min.


Sometimes there’s a sense that a movie is succeeding because of its timeliness and little more. It’s why there are instances of multiple biopics vying to be first out the door after a subject’s death but sometimes, it’s a little more abstract than that. That certainly appears to be the case with Ava DuVernay’s Selma which was in production long before the events of Ferguson ever happened but in the wake of that national disaster, Selma is likely to become a rallying cry for change and it’s a damned fine one at that.

Written by newcomer Paul Webb, Selma picks up in early 1965. LBJ is in office and he has a pretty good relationship with Martin Luther King Jr.. In one particular meeting, King pushes for change, namely in the ability of African Americans to vote. Johnson argues there are more important issues to deal with; he has a different agenda. King pushes ahead with the argument and along with the leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the group take action and their next fight to Selma, Alabama. A ripe territory for a showdown.

Du Vernay’s film isn’t simply a retelling of the events leading up to what happened in Selma. It’s also a portrait of a man who has been fighting for a long time. A man who is tired; a man who feels defeated; a man who leads but does not go on alone. Webb’s portrait of King gives the good with the bad. The film shows King to have been a great preacher, a man who could mobilise masses, but it also doesn’t shy away from King’s troubles; his infidelities, his indecision, his feeling of defeat and fighting an unwinnable fight. Mostly it creates the picture of a man who led a movement but who was only human. A man who relied on the supported by the people around him to succeed.

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