Super Ticket Episode 8 – Rowgue Three

Mamo and Cinecast unite to form the Super Ticket! We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us. We are one with the force, the force is with us.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and may the force be with you!

 


TIME TRACKS:

Opening Crawl: :00
Welcome/Roll Call: :37
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (SPOILERS!): 2:11 – 1:29:22
Goodbyes/Plugs: 1:23:10
Outro music: 1:27:52 – 1:29:50

 

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Andrew James
Podcaster. Tech junkie. Movie lover. Also games and guitar. I dig music.

16 Comments

  1. An interesting bit of trivia about ROGUE ONE is that Forest Whitaker’s character of Saw Gerrera is a veteran of the Clone Wars and was previously depicted in the 2008-2014 animated series.

    Of course, the film doesn’t allude to any of that.

    Reply
    • Yeah we all saw it too. I was saying that I didn’t really love it, but I also would have thought it a cop-out by just showing her from the back. I think maybe just the name drop earlier in the film is good enough – we didn’t really need to see her at all.

      Reply
  2. Thank god I only saw the teaser trailer and avoided all other trailers and behind-the-scenes footage. The film met my expectations and more. I really dug all of it, EXCEPT the final minutes. It felt so contrived. That scene quickly reminded me of the reported re-shoots that I completely forgot about reading.

    I’m with Kurt. I didn’t leave the theater thinking “where were the interesting characters?”. For me, this was a WWII classic film. Part Army of Shadows and part Hell Is For Heroes. I only saw low-level underdog characters that were never meant to be the A-team. Then, forced into a scenario to take matters into their own hands. I loved Diego Luna’s performance. To me, the only similarity between the Jyn & Rey characters are that they both are female lead characters and both “Mary Sues”. They have exactly the same scene in separate films where their respective male leads watch them in awe during a fight sequence. A well-intended concept, but in the end, I find more regressive than progressive. Fury Road does it way better.

    Other than that, the weakest link wasn’t the characters. For me, it was most of the “Star Wars” callbacks, especially certain CGI human characters.

    Reply
    • See, I was thinking that if this were a classic WWII film (which they were clearly going for in a lot of ways), I think it would be even more of a bore. It’s the fact that they are Stormtroopers and AT-ATs and laser blasters and we know what’s at stake (from the reference point of future films – specifically Episode IV) that makes it interesting. If this was just a rag tag group of guerrilla fighters trying to get plans for a Nazi tank or underground bunker or something, it would just be boring specifically because there is no connection to any of the characters and no chemistry between them.

      And the main difference between Jyn and Rey? Simple. Felicity Jones and Daisy Ridley. There is no contest in terms of charisma and character building and likability. Ridley’s performance was one of my favorites from 2015 and Jones was fine but was a bit of a wet noodle.

      Reply
      • We definitely saw a different film because I didn’t find any of it boring. For me, characters don’t have to go a specific way, even in the Star Wars franchise. For me, the serious tone of the film warranted the appropriate amount of humor and charisma from the characters. I totally embraced the tone of the film, especially the scenes in the city in Jedha. It felt like a real occupied city in WWII drama films. Full of dread, which is unlike anything I’ve seen in Star Wars. I could see fanboys hate it because it lacked the fun of Mos Eisley, though there was still some fun. But if you remove all the fan service scenes, Rogue One is almost a different genre because it’s tonally different.

        Gareth Edwards isn’t known for his relatable and charismatic characters. I think he just treats them differently within the story he’s telling. Here and in Godzilla, I found his characters effective because they react truthfully to the environment and situation they’re in, instead of being bigger than life. His characters fit the themes of his films.

        Reply
        • It’s been a few days but my feelings straddle somewhere between you two. I fear the Film Junk boys have tainted my impressions even they though they typically don’t. I liked the inconspicious first half an “some” of the fan service but it really felt like the studio reshoots muddled it for the worse. The tonal shifts in the 3rd act mar the continuity. Definitely don’t need all-amazing characters for this film but considering Jyn Erso is the only one with backstory, she didn’t seem fleshed out at all. I need to see it again to cement my thoughts.

          Reply
  3. I don’t think it’s a stretch at all for Diego Luna’s character to go from deciding not to assassinate one character to then trying saving the same person’s daughter, especially since she is the only one left to prove a certain message exists. Also, saving her would prevent her capture that could reveal the rebel base. There are many viewpoints that support his action. His possible attraction to her never crossed my mind as one of the motivations.

    Reply
    • I’m with you. I don’t think it was a stretch either. It made sense; and for me it just came down to him having a gut feeling on doing “the right thing.”

      That said, after his change of heart, why not shoot the Mendohlson character? That would have made more sense.

      Reply
      • That’s a valid point. My only reason would be that assassinating Krennic wasn’t his mission. Accomplishing his original mission would automatically be suicide for the him and the group, since they have no ship to escape with. I assume Cassian’s decision was to spare Gallan and find away to return to base with Gallan and/or Jyn and convince the council that the Death Star exists. Killing Krennic would be a lose-lose scenario. Capture or death to Cassian and his team. Krennic would just be replaced by another ambitious Imperial officer and Gallan would be alive to finish the Death Star.

        Reply
  4. I thought Jyn’s arcetype was pretty obvious and it was weird to me that they took all agency from that in the last moments.

    In classic Western tropes she watches the bad guy do in / kidnap her parents, then in the final confrontation with him she doesn’t even get the cool moment and the guy gets to kill him for her.

    Reply

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