Cinecast Episode 440 – No Selfies at the Orgy

Weather conditions can always be spotted based on Kurt’s drinking habits. This week it’s a smoky IPA, so guess what’s going on outside. Ergo, guess how often we got to the theater. Luckily it’s the digital age and there are zombies to be thwarted. Bo Mikkelson’s What We Become is this week’s subject of discussion. You might think this is just another low-budget, run-of-the-mill zombie flick, but not so fast. There’s more going in this world than run shoot growl die. Susan Sarandon is back in action along with Rose Byrne and J.K. Simmons in The Meddler. Is it perfect for date night? Kurt’s got the answer. There’s time travel on the mnd as the boys grind the gears of Synchronicity. Andrew goes back to very early Alec Guiness and Alec Guiness and Alec Guiness and Alec Guiness and Alec Guiness and Alec Guiness and Alec Guniess in Kind Hearts and Coronets – a delightfully twisted comedy from the 90s. We do indulge in a little “Between Two Thrones” as well; and it felt good. Also Eyes Wide Shut; what a shock.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

 


 

TIME TRACKS:

See comments for time track listings – thanks to Ultimolee for the extra elbow grease!

 

MAIN REVIEWS:

What We Become
The Meddler

 

THE WATCH LIST:

ANDREW
Synchronicity
Kind Hearts and Coronets

KURT
Eyes Wide Shut

 

RSS AND CONTACT INFO:

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UltimoLee
Guest

Opening:
In-house business: 01:44
What We Become [SPOILERS] 05:30
The Meddler 22:50
The Watch List: 35:33
Next Week: 1:12:48
End: 1:22:13
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I know Kurt will already know this but 10 Rillington Place is definitely not the first serial killer film. First one to pop into my head was Peeping Tom (1960) and that’s not even close. There’s M (1931) and the earliest i could think of was Hitchcock’s The Lodger (1927).

Kurt
Guest

M is more paedophile than serial killer. 10 Rillington place is more what a ‘modern’ serial killer film looks and feels like.

But yea, on the subject of Hitchcock, Shadow Of A Doubt would probably be the better choice than The Lodger.

Matt Gamble
Guest

He murders children in M. The movie is pretty explicit on that point.

Matthew Price
Guest

M is a “modern” serial killer – he’s driven to it by his psychology and not material gain – and yes he also has paedophilic drives, but ultimately he needs to kill them as well. I don’t think The Lodger (which is actually about a mistaken identity and not the Ripper himself) or Shadow of a Doubt (Uncle Charlie murders for money, and to escape capture) are really about serial killers.

Robert Reineke
Guest

The Leopard Man is a serial killer movie too.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

Early Serial killer movies are all apparently named after animals:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bat_(1959_film)

devolutionary
Guest

It’s an easy allegory to make. “Only an ‘animal-like’ human could conceive of such predatory acts!”
Have you seen Chaplin’s Monsieur Verdoux? A mostly black-comedy which depicts and empathizes with him as a farcical serial killer. I’m pretty sure it was viewed in poor taste here, but did well in Europe. He apparently bought the script from Welles.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Dang. I’ll definitely look for that.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

As a big fan of Jacques Tourneur’s Night of the Demon, I should be looking around Youtube for a streaming version of THE LEOPARD MAN, which I’ve not seen.

Robert Reineke
Guest

You should enjoy it. It’s not as good as the other Lewton / Tourneur films, mostly because of the script, but its scares are effective, the atmosphere is thick, and there are some surprising moments of character development.

Dob
Guest

I just happened to watch Lolita. It’s very good (but far from a masterpiece) and way ahead of its time filmmaking-wise. Lot is suggested, little is shown. In certain scenes it works, in others – it flat-out doesn’t. The score is pretty bad and of its time. The opening scene is weak and looked as if lifted from a 1930’s movie. There are amazing stuff inside, but it felt surreal that this film was made in 1961 and a mere 18 years later there was Alien. If you compare both, they look centuries apart.

Andrew James
Admin

A weird comparison, but I totally see your point.

I remember being mostly bored by Lolita. Sometimes when I rewatch a movie like that 20 years later it’s still boring. Other times I go, “what the hell was I thinking!?”

I’ll get around to rewatching this one day. From your description, most likely I still won’t like it much – which is sad because I can’t think of another Kubrick film I’ve seen that I don’t enjoy on some level.

Andrew James
Admin

Coincidentally, Lolita is one of the “Deals of the week” this week on Google Play. HD own = $6 and HD rent for $1.
I think they’re trying to tell me something.

Dob
Guest

Sorry, my English isn’t that good, I apologize if I made it sound as if the film wasn’t worth it. It totally does, I guess I just wanted to say it sadly looked pretty dated.

My biggest issues were the opening and the score.

Andrew James
Admin

If English is your second language, then I say bravo to you sir! English has to be crazy difficult to learn and understand. I think your point is made very clearly.

I do want to check in with Lolita again very soon.

Matthew Price
Guest

all due respect to the language barrier – Lolita is a satire, and I’m not sure how well that translates.

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