Cinecast Episode 436 – Greasy

For the foreseeable future it might seem like Andrew is a little drunk right at the beginning of the show; usually that happens at the end. But the truth is he has just woken up at 4 o’clock in the afternoon. So the graveyard shift is affecting speech patterns and logic, but it hasn’t kept us from the theater. In various capacity between the two of us, we were able to catch Jean-Marc Vallée’s Demolition, Richard Linklater’s Everybody Wants Some and Jeff Nichols’ Midnight Special. So yeah, this one is kind of a love fest all around. In the Watch List we have some great 80s trash, a Richard Gere marathon, some great kid-friendly fare, Kim Jong-un and Robert DeNiro tries not to shit the bed. All this and much much more in the Kurt and Andrew Sunday conversation.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

 


 

TIME TRACKS:

See comments for time track listings – thanks to Ultimolee for the extra elbow grease!

 

REVIEWS:

Demolition
Midnight Special
Everybody Wants Some

 

THE WATCH LIST:

KURT
Long Way North
Oddball
Being Flynn
Shakedown
Staying Alive

ANDREW
– Richard Gere marathon: Internal Affairs, Primal Fear, I’m Not There, An Officer and a Gentlemen
Ran
The Interview

 

OTHER THINGS:

Kurt’s Kidz talk about Oddball

Kurt’s Kidz talk about Long Way North

 

RSS AND CONTACT INFO:

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schizopolis
Guest

Was the opening Sam Elliott from Shakedown?? I just watched it recently. What a lost gem B-action movie!

schizopolis
Guest

After listening to Kurt’s review of Shakedown, I’m in total agreement! I just saw this a month ago and logged it on Letterboxd: http://boxd.it/8U5Jf

James Glickenhaus is one strange 80’s director. I’ve seen The Exterminator, The Soldier and Shakedown, which is his best. The tone is all over the place and overly-masculine. His endings are all set at the World Trade Center.

Andrew James
Admin

Good ear. Yes it was. Kurt saw it theatrically this week and talked about it for a bit on the show.

Andrew James
Admin

And now I see your other comment, so you already knew this. Carry on.

schizopolis
Guest

By the way, Shakedown is currently on HBO Go!

Andrew James
Admin

Comcast figured me out and I no longer have HBOGO 🙁

I can purchase HBONOW if I want to but I already have too many streaming services that I’m paying for.

Just signed up for the free 7 day trial of STARZ just so I can watch Coppola’s “The Cotton Club.”

Robert Reineke
Guest

I’d advise against taking what Kurt said on Kurosawa’s late career financing and his popularity in Japan at face value. For one thing, Lucas and Coppola helped finance Kagemusha not Ran, Kurosawa had French backers for the latter. Second, reports of Kurosawa being unpopular with Japanese audiences are vastly overstated. Ikiru, Seven Samurai, The Hidden Fortress, Yojimbo, Sanjuro, and Red Beard were massive hits in Japan. Kurosawa had problems getting financing for Kagemusha and Ran because 1) he hadn’t had a hit since Red Beard, 2) he was regarded as being unstable after behaving poorly and quitting Tora, Tora, Tora and having attempted suicide in the early 70s, 3) popular tastes had changed in regards to a new wave of Japanese directors in the 1970s (not to mention Jaws and Star Wars), 4) Kagemusha and Ran were very expensive films and not very commercial compared to contemporary tastes, and 5) Kurosawa was old and in ill health and there were doubts if he was capable of helming big, complicated projects like those.

Let’s face it, Spielberg, Scorsese, and Scott are outliers as far as being able to garner blockbuster budgets late in their careers. How many years did it take for George Miller to get Mad Max: Fury Road off the ground?

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

I defer to your expertise on the nuances of Late career Kurosawa, but in terms of George Miller, he raised most of the money for FURY ROAD in the early 2000s to be shot with Mel Gibson, but a blooming desert (2001 was a half-century record rainfall on the continent) and a few $ shy of budget (Due to an Aussie Dollar collapsing against the US Dollar) shut down the whole production, Lost in La Mancha style. This is the reason why the shot in Namibia for the new ones, a piece of desert where it gets world-record low rainfalls

Robert Reineke
Guest

Well. if Miller was a hot, young director I tend to think the delay would have only lasted a year, not a decade. And, we have directors like Dante, Carpenter, and Landis that can’t get studio funding to save their lives. Granted, Kurosawa was more highly regarded than all of those, but it’s not like Kagemusha and Ran made money by the bucketloads either, even if both are highly acclaimed.

Andrew James
Admin

Regarding this weekend’s releases, there isn’t much pinging my radar. Nothing that we mentioned to hopefully open is opening here it doesn’t look like. Meanwhile, THE JUNGLE BOOK is still at 100% on Rot Tom.

Miles Ahead = I LOVE Don Cheadle, but this looks so vanilla safe. I’d rather go see the other trumpet player movie with Ethan Hawke… but I probably won’t see that either.

My Golden Days = getting good reviews, but I saw A Christmas Tale and I had a hard time staying awake.

April and the Extraordinary World = Good reviews but The French equivalent of anime look irritating to me.

Perhaps it’s time to finally pick up my MSPIFF badge and see what’s playing.

Andrew James
Guest

Oh no, I take it back. There’s a Costner movie this weekend. BAM!

UltimoLee
Guest

Opening:
In-house business: 1:25
Demolition [SPOILERS] 4:27
Midnight Special 26:14
Everybody Wants Some 53:44
The Watch List: 1:04:47
Next Week: 2:28:22
End: 2:33:00

mike rot
Guest

I vote also that Hologram for the King as worst trailer, my God. I wasn’t a fan of the book, but that plays like self-satire.

Andrew, were you aware that Jake’s girlfriend in Everybody Wants Some!! is Lea Thompson’s daughter? That made me feel so old when I discovered that. I plan to rewatch Dazed and Confused soon but to me, I consider the two movies equal. As Kurt said, hanging out movies, and particularly enjoyable to hang with these guys. I also found it refreshing after decades of geek culture dominating everything that this was a throwback pre-Revenge of the Nerds, when jocks could be dramatic leads without broad caricature. It felt new again, and the whole working as a team angle, and you sense them feeling each other out on and off the field, I guess the way you were talking about for the first twenty minutes, as relative unknowns, it felt refreshing and fun and funny. Also I grew up in a sports-minded family, baseball team at the house, and this depiction of that dynamic felt so true.

I love Midnight Special but I remember leaving the theater thinking it was a solid 4/5 kinda love, and then I kept thinking about it, and I guess listening to Jeff Nichols talk about his process helped goad a greater appreciation for the craft and what he accomplishes with seemingly so little. I had the same problem with Take Shelter on first viewing, seemed too simple, some impatience on my part, not listening to the movie but more on auto-pilot. Kurt said it best, they are movies that require you to lean in.

schizopolis
Guest

Watched Midnight Special yesterday and fucking loved it. By the end, I definitely saw it as an allegory about parents caring for a child that’s terminally ill. Like Bryan singer uses superheroes as a metaphor for gay people or oppressed minorities in general, Nichols uses a child with powers as a metaphor for special needs children. He uses sci-fi to basically give meaning to something that’s somewhat meaningless. I’m not a parent, but I was kinda floored at the end. My favorite film of the year, so far.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I am with you on so many levels, Schiz – the movie is top to bottom excellent as simple (primal) ideas are articulated with real care and quality. Everything is considered. I doesn’t have to be terminally ill though, although there are a few literal elements in the story that strengthen that, it works well just kids growing up and finding their own path.

mike rot
Guest

Jeff Nichols goes into detail about his personal connection with the story, I believe here: http://www.theqandapodcast.com/2016/04/host-jeff-goldsmith-interviews-writer.html or it might have been in the Leonard Maltin interview.

devolutionary
Guest

The Maltin one briefly touches on it. I’ll have to catch that podcast later.
He also goes into depth in this DGA interview with fellow director Jonathan Levine. https://youtu.be/pNZ81bvQ-bs

schizopolis
Guest

Thanks!! I’m gonna listen to the interviews this week.

schizopolis
Guest

I agree. There are many interpretations and that’s what I love about the mystery. But that reveal at the end hit me like an avalanche when I had the terminally ill symbolism in mind. Especially, the way the boy’s parents end up emotionally. The mother literally sees a long steep stairway and the father gets his moment of connection at the very last frame. I guess watching an 8-9 year old boy physically suffer throughout the film put that idea in my head. It never really occurred to me that it was about finding his own path because he was so young. It works. But, the ending would’ve been less powerful for me.

mike rot
Guest

***********Midnight Trailer spoilers I guess**********************Midnight Trailer spoilers I guess**********************Midnight Trailer spoilers I guess**********************Midnight Trailer spoilers I guess***********

Can someone explain what makes Adam Driver go “I know where they’re heading, it’s remarkable” What did I miss?

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Richard Dreyfuss moment for him?

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