Mamo 430: The Battle of the Decompression of the Lord of the Mockingjays, Part II

Mamo!

What’s with all these Part Is, Part IIs, 13-part Netflix series, and the rest? Well, we already know the answer: money. But the case of the extended cut of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies provides a study in knowing when your movie is too long, just right, or in some cases, not long enough.

Apologies in advance – this episode is noisy, even for us. We’ll try to pick a better spot next time (although to be fair, the pizza was terrific).

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Rick Vance
Guest

The noise was getting to the limit however it did produce Price relating the crash of comics in the 90s to mainstream multi-part blockbusters while a height of Glam Rock Power Ballad decline of the 80s in music was playing on the radio so that was kind of perfect.

Philip Poirot
Guest

Scott Mendelson’s article “‘Hunger Games’ Box Office: Why $101M Weekend For ‘Mockingjay 2’ May Be Cause For Despair” obviously gets the reason behind the downturn of the box office results.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottmendelson/2015/11/22/box-office-why-a-101m-weekend-for-hunger-games-mockingjay-2-may-be-cause-for-despair/

Lifting quotes to Summarize — “I would argue that this (comparatively) brutal domestic downturn confirms my worst fears about the fanbase or at least the appeal to general audiences in regards to this specific franchise. What do the first two movies have that the second two movies do not? The answer is “bread and circuses.” “…..

“The first two films are of course a blistering satire of infotainment and character-centric propaganda. We see how the contestants are dissected and analyzed on national state-sponsored television as if they were modern day glitz-and-glamour celebrities and/or reality show contestants. We see Jennifer Lawrence’s Katniss winning over the audience via a variety of showy outfits, a few flashy moments of battle readiness, and a wholly manufactured romantic subplot with Peeta (Josh Hutchinson). Too much of the discussion centered around the outfits, Katniss’s show pony performance, and which of the two handsome boys she should end up with.” ….
“The final Hunger Games film IS NOT filled with breathless action, a spectacular fight to the finish, and a glorious victory against President Snow.” …. “they also denied us the show-stopping action finale many of us (be it as fans of the movies or when originally reading the books) expected.”
******************
I consider myself among the fan bases of the books by Suzanne Collins. I saw how Suzanne Collins felt ashamed of the popularity the first two books got and saw her readers ironically turn into the culture she was satirizing – Collins completely switched gears and turned the last books into GRIM War Story. AND not unexpectedly, a HUGE PERCENTAGE OF the readers were turned off.

So you are adapting this material into film AS FAITHFULLY AS YOU POSSIBLY CAN. I just don’t see how you can do a better job than Francis Lawrence. Sure he’s not an Auteur like David Fincher, but he’s the best at what he does. Compare every other director that has directed these YA films – nobody even comes close. What happened to the DIVERGENT series?! They were better books than Hunger Games (arguably). If only they could get Francis.

Gerry
Guest

I don’t have a problem with 150 – 180 minute action or fantasy films, if they’re good.

The problem I have is with writers / directors who have a good, well paced, 90 minute film and think ‘hold on, aren’t these films meant to last 150 minutes? Let me change this intro from 10 minutes to an hour’ and I have to sit through the resulting hour long dirge of a first act. (I’m looking at you Godzilla.)

Splitting films into two for no good reason other than as an exercise in cash acquisition really kills films, for me.

I watched Hunger Games Mockingjay 1 and 2 and, despite their interesting politics and Jennifer Lawrence proving yet again what a good actress she is, it was quite the (literally) colourless slog, despite seeing the films over 2 nights. What a good single film that would’ve made.

I liked Divergent because of Neil Burger’s visual style, Junkie XL’s great music, a truly magical scene, and Tris’ arc, but without the first 3 I found Insurgent to be a big bowl of meh, though it did explain one aspect of Divergent that didn’t make any sense to me. (involving beads sewn into eyebrows).

The trailer for Allegiant makes it look a bit nuts but fun, but split over 2 films I’m guessing that won’t be the case, with (based on the trailer) the 4th film ‘Genericbattle-ent’ being a 2 hour battle against aliens.

Will I pay to see The Stand in quarterly chunks? Hell no. I’ll watch it on a streaming service or TV.

Philip Poirot
Guest

I am a little surprised that even Matt Brown is treating Jessica Jones as just a superhero show. Is it not a NOIR? I thought Melissa Rosenberg just decided to put her foot down on Chris Nolan and every other male filmmakers who are still treating female characters as “femme fatales” and “suspicious others” in this genre. She built this story world so successfully that I keep relating to every female character and getting suspicious of every male character and I realize that I’m still in a Dashiell Hammett or Raymond Chandler type world. It’s just fantastic.

Matthew Price
Guest

Jessica Jones is definitely not noir. It’s a detective story, but not every detective story is noir. Noir is not just a bunch of story elements, JJ has very little in common stylistically with true or even neo-noir.

Philip Poirot
Guest

Why not? I don’t get it. I have thrown most of the elements of that genre and it sticks. I know Veronica Mars, Sherlock Holmes or CSI are detective stories – they are not noir. I would love if you can point me towards any material that can help me understand your point, I’d appreciate it.

** Just to clarify by saying Noir, of course I mean Neo-Noir. You can not create a renaissance painting in 2015 as I understand. 🙂

Matthew Price
Guest

“I have thrown most of the elements of that genre and it sticks” respectfully, you have not done this correctly, or else you wouldn’t be having such difficulty understanding my argument. You do not understand what constitutes film noir – saying JJ is noir (neo or otherwise) is like saying Roger Rabbit is noir. Neither is, for reasons which should be obvious.

Philip Poirot
Guest

It is a coincidence that I’ve seen that Roger Rabbit comparison in a comment before. he he. I know what you mean but the other comment was disparaging equating women to toons. I think you have a very strict definition of what Neo Noir is but I am referring to more loose definition of it. The same way a lot of people argue that Dark City, Minority Report, Kill Bill and Inception are Neo Noirs. Even Nolan argued that Inception is a neo noir. These are genre mash-ups?!

Andrew James
Admin

Absolutely. The same way Firefly is a western.

Andrew James
Admin

Jessica Jones is most definitely neo-Noir.

film noir
ˌfilm ˈnwär/
noun: film noir
a style or genre of cinematographic film marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, and menace. The term was originally applied (by a group of French critics) to American thriller or detective films made in the period 1944–54 and to the work of directors such as Orson Welles, Fritz Lang, and Billy Wilder.

And this describes “Jessica Jones” to a tee. Jessica Jones is a private eye with a drinking problem. There is a steamy underbelly of a city in which femme fatales show up looking to pin something on their significant other. To clarify inner feelings and motivations, there is “noir-esque” narration doled out that is absolutely mimicking language, style and tone of noir detective movies of the 40s.

And this quote is exactly every character in “Jessica Jones”:
Film noir encompasses a range of plots: the central figure may be a private eye (Jessica Jones), a plainclothes policeman (the cop guy), an aging boxer (the bartender), a hapless grifter (Malcolm), a law-abiding citizen lured into a life of crime (Trish), or simply a victim of circumstance (survivor group).

I’m not saying it’s necessarily good noir, but it certainly taking a shot at being such.

Matthew Price
Guest

Nope

Andrew James
Admin

Funny. Just about every review or description of the show labels it as neo noir or at the very least having noir elements. This includes the writers and the directors. But Price says no, so it probably isn’t. Except that it is.

Andrew James
Admin

And for the record, I’ll probably finish watching the series, but four episodes in, this show feels like someone trying to bring back “Heroes” in the style of a J.J. Abrams script… and not doing it very well. It’s so full of hand-holding and eye-rolling moments of dialogue by characters who are supposed to be serious and are just not very good at acting or are too hammy for the character they are supposed to be, that I’m surprised this wasn’t a CBS at 7pm show (except of course for the R-rated elements of sex, swearing, etc.).

The ideas are interesting, but it’s not carried out particularly well.

Andrew James
Admin

Ugh. I just got through episode seven (barely). The dialogue and character motivations are just unbearably terrible. It was like an episode of Young and the Restless. Then I realized the writer is the same person who wrote “The OC”, “Step Up”, “Party of Five” and the entire Twilight series. Why am I not shocked?

Nobody talks to each other. Nobody listens. Everyone (everyone) just goes off and does whatever they want on whim making stupid decisions – even when the decisions are not stupid, everyone else thinks they are so they all go off and do their own thing to foil said decisions through deceptions, lies or simply ignoring reason and logic. Dodging phone calls, lying about inconsequential shit and anything in here revolving around a romantic relationship is some of the most vomit-inducing TV dialogue I’ve seen in a long time. Basically everyone is just annoying (including Ritter).

I’m not sure I can get through much more of this tripe.

Andrew James
Guest

I have no idea what that even means.

Andrew
Guest

You’re spot on about BotfA Matt, you inspired me to rewatch it, and I liked it a lot more this time through. And yeah, the sound in this episode is brutal.

Philip Poirot
Guest

I am going to check it out this weekend. I am optimistic after listening to Matt Brown.

wpDiscuz