Cinecast Episode 416 – List List

Last week we talked about all of the films coming in the next week that we’d have a tough time reviewing them all. As a consequence, we review none of them. Instead, we just glide from this to that, as Moses Znaimer would say, it is flow, not show. We look at our Top 5 Danny Boyle films, and as we are wont to do, talk at length about Sunshine. A medley of Mamet, Soderbergh, Bullock, Sorkin, Halloween horror and various other bon bons are extracted from the candy box. We call these: “shoot the shit” shows and we hope you find something worthwhile in the grab-bag. Note that the show is almost 100% spoiler free this week!

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 

 


 

TIME TRACKS:

See comments for more time track listings – thanks to Ultimolee for the extra elbow grease!

 

SHOOTING THE BREEZE:

Ghostwatch (Andrew)
The Babadook (Kurt)
Room (Andrew)
Our Brand is Crisis (Kurt)

 

TOP FIVE DANNY BOYLE FILMS:

Andrew
Slumdog Millionaire
Steve Jobs
Trainspotting
Sunshine
28 Days Later

Kurt
28 Days Later
Steve Jobs
Shallow Grave
Trainspotting
Sunshine

 

MORE SHOOTING THE BREEZE:

Magic Mike XXL (Andrew)
Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine (Kurt)
Popcorn (Andrew)
Pulse (Andrew)
Ex Machina (Kurt)
The Edge (Kurt)
The Experimenter (Andrew)

 

OTHER THINGS:

NASA’s video of the Sun in 4K Hi-Def

 

RSS AND CONTACT INFO:

show content

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
antho42
Guest

The thing about Pulse, unlike other horror films, it deals with depression; a good one at that. The tape of room is unbelievable scene. So low fi, but so effective. My favorite Kiyoshi Kurosawa film is Cure — his take on the serial killer genre.

antho42
Guest

Also, Matthew Price and Bob have a good episode on Pulse on Let’s Scared Matthew Price:

Nat Almirall
Guest

Can we please have more of Kurt’s a capella instrumentals?

Lee
Guest

Opening:
In-house business: 00:51
Last Of Halloween: 5:47
A bit on Room: 25:59
A bit of Our Brand Is Crisis: 40:20
Top 5 Danny Boyle Films: 54:00
The Watch List: 1:21:28
Next Week: 2:13:55
End: 2:20:40

Sean Kelly
Guest

While Kurt is surprised that ROOM is playing on only one screen, I am not surprised AT ALL.

As a semi-regular patron of the Cineplex Varsity Cinemas, I will say that there have been MANY films that only played at that cinema and never even received a wider release. It’s just the nature of indie film distribution, where increasingly less such films get booked into multiplexes.

That said, ROOM is expanding to about six cinemas in Toronto this weekend.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

In the case of ROOM winning the PEOPLE’S CHOICE award at this year TIFF, I’d expect the distributor would spend a little more time/effort/money to get it in a few more cinemas.

Sean Kelly
Guest

You may think that the People’s Choice would add more theatrical clout to a film, but that’s not always the case.

Just look at the 2011 winner WHERE DO WE GO NOW?, which only had a brief theatrical run at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

Also, the release plan for ROOM was likely already in place long before it screened at TIFF.

Andrew James
Admin

Good point. Never even heard of Where Do We Go Now?.

Sean Kelly
Guest

It’s on Netflix (at least in Canada). I’ll be watching it next month for my TIFF-themed blindspot series.

devolutionary
Guest

I believe there’s a box-office curse on any serious drama directed by David Gordon Green, no matter how good it is. No wonder he switched to comedies.
http://www.boxofficemojo.com/people/chart/?id=davidgordongreen.htm

Kurt
Guest

Which is a shame, considering the 3 punch of George Washington, All The Real Girls and Undertow at the beginning of his career are home runs.

Sean Kelly
Guest

I take issue with being indirectly called an idiot by Kurt.

I don’t care that you think that the Sorkin/Boyle STEVE JOBS film is “important.” A film is not doing its job when you are beginning to fall asleep in the third act.

Kurt
Guest

But I was not falling asleep. The film is wonderfully engaging throughout, for me. Compellingly written, staged, acted, etc. etc.
On the other hand, the MAN IN THE MACHINE doc is mid-grade TV filler at best.

Sean Kelly
Guest

Well Kurt, I DID fall asleep and I am blaming the fact that it has no real cinematic plot structure, other than have the exact same conversations over and over again.

Yes, you love it, but it’s already been established that we have a wildly different taste in movies.

I won’t say that will never rewatch STEVE JOBS, but I will say that it will be nowhere near my end-of-year list.

Andrew James
Admin

“…no real Cinematic plot structure…”

This is just flat out wrong. It takes a conventional bio-pic plot and condenses it into one segment of a man’s life/career and then breaks that down int three distinct acts in which everything over the past 5 years essentially happens all at once. It’s unlike any structure I’ve ever seen and works incredibly coherently and engagingly. You can say you didn’t like the structure, but its incredibly original and to me borders on genius.

 
“…the exact same conversations over and over again.”

First of all, I don’t believe they are at all the same conversations. And even if they were, having the same conversation four to ten years apart is by its very nature going to be a different conversation. The arc between Jobs and his daughter/ex-wife/Woz/Hertzfeld/Scully/Joanna is fairly large and their interactions at each act throughout the film are in completely different contexts considering all that has happened to them (including the simple act of aging) over the previous 4-10 years.

Sean Kelly
Guest

My opinion on the film stands.

Gerry
Guest

I really liked ‘the MAN IN THE MACHINE doc’. I was engaged throughout, and thought it was fascinating, way above TV level.

The only problem is that I fear it may have ruined seeing Danny Boyle’s film for me as I now have too much info on the man.

Andrew James
Admin

Name calling aside, I don’t see how Boyle’s Jobs is sleep-inducing outside of becoming mentally exhausted by the onslaught of things coming at you/Fassbender. The tension and stress and sheer cinema happening in that movie is astounding.

I can understand not liking it for one reason or another, but snooze-fest is simply not in this film’s on-screen vocabulary.

Sean Kelly
Guest

*Yawn*

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I just watched another Jobs doc, The BBC’s “STEVE JOBS: ONE LAST THING” and it’s even worse than MAN IN THE MACHINE.

Gerry
Guest

SPOILER ALERT FOR STEVE JOBS AND THE DOC STEVE JOBS THE MAN IN THE MACHINE XXXXX SPOILER ALERT FOR STEVE JOBS AND THE DOC STEVE JOBS THE MAN IN THE MACHINE XXXXX SPOILER ALERT FOR STEVE JOBS AND THE DOC STEVE JOBS THE MAN IN THE MACHINE XXXXX SPOILER ALERT FOR STEVE JOBS AND THE DOC STEVE JOBS THE MAN IN THE MACHINE XXXXX SPOILER ALERT FOR STEVE JOBS AND THE DOC STEVE JOBS THE MAN IN THE MACHINE XXXXX SPOILER ALERT FOR STEVE JOBS AND THE DOC STEVE JOBS THE MAN IN THE MACHINE XXXXX

Steve Jobs The Man In The Machine dealt presented a man who, despite having only weeks to live and, seemingly, with his Bhuddist faith to lean on, (hundreds of un-work related trips to Japan, which I presume were related to his Bhuddism, seemed to back this up), his family relationships in a good place, hundreds of millions in the bank and personal prestige of enormous magnitude, harassed a Gawker employee who bought an Iphone prototype but returned it without selling it to Apple’s rivals AFTER the man returned the phone.

I might have written this off as a poor soul who only had weeks to live wanting to make another person miserable since he himself was way more miserable with his looming death hanging over him.

However his golden handcuffs policies and collusion with other Silicon Valley firms seemed to indicate some propensity to take personal offence from anyone who was ‘against him’ or betrayed him or had the potential to betray him, in his perception.

Was this related to his being adopted and subsequent feelings of rejection?

Did he initially reject his daughter as a form of ‘abusers repeating the abuse they’ve been subjected to’, i.e. he was repeating his rejection.

That was incredibly fascinating to me.

I’m a huge fan of Danny Boyle and the structure of the film seems clever but, judging from the trailers, Sorkin’s approach seems incredibly on the nose, i.e. Jobs girlfriend informing Jobs in hammy fashion that his daughter is living on welfare despite his millions and Woz telling Jobs what he isn’t in very literal fashion.

Sorkin’s a good writer and you seem to be implying that he dealt with the issues that fascinated me in way more subtle and sophisticated fashion than the trailer indicated.

If this is the case and the film isn’t as on the nose as it seems then I’m really looking forward to it.

How did Sorkin deal with these issues Kurt?

wpDiscuz