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Rick
Guest

I feel like this summer movie season was aware of your milestone and decided to go all over the place to commemorate it.

Thomas Wishloff
Guest

Congrats guys!

Just one question. If you guys invented podcasting, then do you view the marathon podcasts of the Cinecast as an enhancement of what you originally created, or a perversion of the original concept?

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

Stirring up shit, are we Thomas? πŸ™‚

Mark Stevens
Guest

Actually, what the two Matts invented was recording podcasts in the noisiest audioscapes imaginable while knocking back food and drink for good measure. (Have you ever listened to your podcasts with headphones?) Thanks, guys, and onward to another ten years.

antho42
Guest

Long live MAMO!!! Been a loyal listener since 2008.

Voncaster
Guest

On Movie Burnout
I’m the some way with video games, I used to love all sorts of video games and now I’m pretty burnt out on them. The answer I have found is to varry my activities a lot more. I started reading for pleasure, listening to more music, watching tv shows, watching movies, running outside, going to the gym, and visiting art museums. A much much smaller portion of my day or week now is spent with video games. The shorter time I now spend with video games I tend to enjoy a lot more as a result. Any activity that you do over and over can bring on burnout. I’m glad MAMO and the cinecast make it to the multiplexes on a regular basis, but I couldn’t do that.

On Pixar
All I can say is your not alone, if you don’t enjoy Pixar movies. The combination of a 100% CGI world, with 100% CGI characters, stories with a morals, and generally happy aesthetic really turns me off of their movies. I’m not big on other CGI movies for kids either, but the Pixar stuff does not work for me. Some of Pixar’s films received Kurosawa-levels of praise from critics. Which maybe raises expectations too high as well for CGI kids movies.

mike rot
Guest

The narratives we impose on ourselves will be our downfall. As Beckett said: “That’s the mistake I made, one of the mistakes, to have wanted a story for myself, whereas life alone is enough.”

Let movies in.

We have long habits, and the thrill is hard to get, but when it hits, it’s extra sweet.

Ten years! That’s dedication, congratulations guys!

Sean Kelly
Guest

My first experience with Mamo was NOT through the podcast, but instead through a video on The Substream (R.I.P.). I had started going to the site in the fall of 2011 to check out their coverage for the Toronto After Dark Film Festival and I started perrousing the other videos, one of which had the two Matts (I should also add that The Substream was my introduction to Kurt, since he was doing many of The Substream’s Toronto After Dark video reviews).

Of course, Toronto After Dark was also the reason I started listening to the podcast, since episode 225 was highly critical of the festival and I made my very first Row Three comment as one of the defenders.

Of course, I still liked what I heard and subscribed. In fact, I was actually subscribed to the standalone Mamo feed for a few months before I decided that I should also start listening to this “Cinecast” thing I kept seeing getting posted on Row Three πŸ˜‰

I actually still remember the first time I met the Matts in person. I met Matt Price at a random encounter in the lobby of the Bell Lightbox (he recognized me from Twitter) and I would meet Matt Brown a couple months later when I attended the Toronto blogger meet-up for the first time, where he helped me realize that I should change my Twitter handle from @skonmovies to @SKonMovies, since it was being misread as a Star Trek reference (i.e. Skon Movies).

I don’t always agree with what’s said on the podcast (and I admit that I can sometimes come off as a jerk when I give my own opinions), I’ve been listening to Mamo regularly for nearly four years and I plan to keep on listening.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Thank you Matthew Price and Matt Brown for 10 years of great podcasts.

Back in 2005, I was listening to a number of podcasts but MAMO has been the only one that has stuck with me these past 10 years.

I look forward to however long you guys keep this show going! πŸ™‚

Andrew James
Admin

Congrats on 10 years guys. Wowza!

On Inside/Out, while I actually really like the movie, I find myself agreeing with Price on a lot of points. I think the “brokenness” of the brain might’ve been explored a bit harder. It almost went there and then pulled back the reins unfortunately. An entire sequence about the nature of mental health could’ve been absolutely fascinating.

As far as the humor goes, two problems with it: one, it’s too broad and obvious. The plot points and other design elements are so clever (like the marbles as you mentioned), but the humor is obvious. However, and this leads into number two, the humor was good enough that it would have been funny had I not seen it in the trailer fifteen times (the brain freeze, the pizza line, the “positive” line, the parents’ brains, etc.).

Sean Kelly
Guest

Like is said often, humour is subjective and I laughed quite a lot during INSIDE OUT.

filmstache
Guest

Although most of the time these guys go way over my head I still love the show because there is nothing else like it out there. I’m wondering is this the kind of show you can listen to in retrospect?

filmstache
Guest

Oh sweet, I can’t wait. I’m slowly revisiting the Cinecast and it is great as well especially as kurt’s worst nightmare of comic book movies comes to fruition in the present.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

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