Tribeca/Lionsgate Announce VOD Service

We had a long talk the other night about HBO breaking away from cable and moving to their own subscription-based service. CBS recently announced something similar with their “CBS All Access” service (anyone need an instant “Twin Peaks” fix?). Is this the way TV and movies are moving for good? Obviously Netflix is here to stay, but what I mean is, with all of these off-shoots, rather than paying a hundred bucks a month for cable, will we be shelling out a hundred bucks a month (or more) for several different streaming platforms? Though in my utopia there would be one service with everything I could possibly want and I’d be willing to pay a premium price for it. But it’s unlikely this will ever happen and with Hulu and Amazon and Netflix already going strong, the future seems to be an ala carte selection of various video on-demand services that you’ll have to navigate to separately. But I digress…

The latest “media conglomerate” seems an unlikely pairing at first whisper since when I think Tribeca Film Fest I think of artier, more thoughtful dramas and Lionsgate conjures thought of people having their limbs sawed off while evil clowns stand by laughing. But of course those are both generalizations and not altogether true. The Tribeca/Lionsgate VOD service has been dubbed “The Tribeca Short List.” Possibly a little misleading to some as some sort of shorts program; but no, this will be a highly curated list of titles from festivals around the world as well as critically acclaimed and prestigious films from the Lionsgate and Tribeca. The list of titles are to be replenished and refreshed each week.

Launching in early 2015, this sounds like a way to see the newest The Hunger Games movie as soon as possible while at the same time making it possible to hunt down all of the festival titles you heard about on podcasts and blogs, but know will never see the light of day (or the darkness of the cinema). In other words, depending on the launch titles announced and price point, I’m kind of digging this idea; count me in!

Here’s a cut and paste job from the press release on Monday morning:

Vancouver, BC, Santa Monica, CA, and New York, NY – October 20, 2014 – In a move to offer premium content to a growing online audience, Lionsgate (NYSE: LGF), a premier next generation global content leader, and Tribeca Enterprises, a diversified global media company which owns and operates the Tribeca Film Festival, have partnered to launch a subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) service, the two companies announced today.

The service, called Tribeca Short List, will encompass a prestigious selection of Lionsgate and Tribeca titles as well as critically-acclaimed films drawn from around the world. The films will be curated by Tribeca and leading voices in contemporary culture and refreshed on a weekly basis. The service is slated to launch in the first half of calendar 2015.

“The launch of the Tribeca Short List service unites two powerful brands and underscores our commitment to collaborate with blue-chip partners around the world to deliver premium content to online audiences,” said Lionsgate Chief Executive Officer Jon Feltheimer. “The Tribeca name resonates with movie aficionados everywhere, and our service will encompass a highly curated, diverse and prestigious portfolio of quality films.”

“We are pleased to join with Lionsgate, a world-class brand synonymous with innovation and exciting, quality entertainment, to create a highly curated experience that disrupts the ‘more-is-more’ model in today’s streaming on-demand landscape,” said Jane Rosenthal, CEO of Tribeca Enterprises. “Tribeca Short List aims to be a service where you can see films you never got to watch, forgot to watch, and want to watch.”

The new service will be based in New York and will be led by a General Manager and a Board of Directors comprised of Lionsgate and Tribeca executives as well as an Advisory Board that encompasses some of the leading names in American entertainment and culture.

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Kurt Halfyard
Admin

So will NETFLIX just dissolve and fracture if everyone and their brother starts a specialty streaming service?

Matthew Fabb
Guest

I think this scenario is one of the reasons that Netflix started to make their own content. So that even if the major studios or networks break off to their own service, at the bare minimum they would have still have content that no other service would have.

Robert Reineke
Guest

I’m surprised that Warner Bros and Disney haven’t gotten into the game yet. Those two would threaten Netflix’s streaming model.