Mamo #358: X7

Can you believe we’ve already used the title “X-Mamo” for a show? Of course you can, there’s been like a bazillion of these things. What is the state of the longest-running in-continuity superhero franchise? Mamo travels through time…

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo358.mp3

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26 Comments on "Mamo #358: X7"

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Goon
Guest

Gotta agree with Brown, the 1 on 1 character conversations in the X-Men films is why its my favorite superhero franchise. X-Men, the Raimi Spider-Man movies, the scenes with Alfred in the Batman movies , and to some degree the Hellboy movies all grab me in the discussions they have within those scenes. The Disney/Marvel films are always using 1 on 1moments to just push plot along or spew quips, which is still entertaining, but I gravitate to the movies reaching for emotional investment and to show us that these characters care about each other beyond a means to achieve a common goal.

Kurt
Guest

One might argue that as a generally good rule of thumb for popular narrative cinema in general. Considering someone like Quentin Tarantino structures his entire filmography of scenes of basically two people talking to each other, and that is what makes his films so compusively watchable.

Matthew Price
Guest

I like the smaller scenes as well, but Singer’s approach/rhythm/way of engaging his actors all seems off to me. Oh, and I know this is sacrilege, but I don’t and have never felt that Stewart is particularly good in these films. He just looks the part, but acting wise he’s just a TV actor trying to fit into a movie role.

Andrew James
Admin

*stage actor

Matthew Price
Guest

He’s not doing stage acting. He’s doing tv acting.

Kurt
Guest

Stewart is a bit inconsistent as an actor (Toy Soldiers anyone?) but he is in FULL STAGE MODE in David Lynch’s Dune, and it’s wonderful.

Sean Kelly
Guest

Patrick Stewart is great in anything he is in (coming from a somewhat biased Star Trek: TNG fan :P)

Rick Vance
Guest

Its not Lost or Bond it is COMIC BOOKS

This is the first movie that jumps right into the deep end like it felt walking into a grocery store and pulling a random issue off the magazine rack.

The different feeling between this and Marvel is a fantastic thing.

Rick Vance
Guest

What do you guys specifically think someone coming into that movie blind wouldn’t get that isn’t minutae that doesn’t matter to the overall movie?

Rick Vance
Guest

Because you wanted to know.

Bishop the guy with the Rifle has the mutant power of being able to absorb and release energy. (hence why he was sitting in the middle of those 3 Sentinels and not melting)

He is from a separate dystopian X-Men future and was smashed into this one because he is cool.

Also I find the Kitty Pryde thing hilarious because my bet on the reason they did that is the character who has that role in the original story is such a pandora’s box of continuity that they wouldn’t even dare opening that can of worms.

Secondary Mutation good job everyone!

Andrew James
Admin

Funny. This was my question from the Cinecast. What is the “big black guy with red veins'” power? To look angry and shoot a gun?

Thanks for clarifying.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

He was basically absorbing energy and then using it to power his weapons. That is why before a battle someone else on the team would hit him with some sort of energy boost. It’s too bad the movie did a bad job of explaining it.

Also one of the times that he is killed, it’s from several Sentinels shooting energy blasts at him until he can’t absorb any more energy and blows up.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Here’s a crazy giant info graphic showing who made up the X-men line up from 1963 to present day:
comment image

I read X-men as a kid and teenager in the late 1980’s and the early 1990’s and the line-up was rarely the same. X-men was one of those comics that you would look at the heads of the characters in the left hang corner to find out who was in the team. Plus Marvel was often switching out characters from X-Men to X-Factor to X-Force and any of the many other spin offs.

Plus then going back to read classic storylines, the 1990’s X-men cartoon, then not reading hardly any X-men until Joss Whedon’s run with a different line-up. So for me, it’s expecting that any line-up especially in the movies will be different from the line-ups before.

Andrew James
Admin

Didn’t see The Shoveler. Infographic fail.

Dave Nandes
Guest

My formative X-men years are the early 90’s, or what appears to be the beginning of the way-too-fucking-many X-men era.

Thus, my emotional response to every movie is always GIVE ME MORE X-MEN!

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