Mamo #356: The Sound and the Fury

Recorded live on the loud streets of Toronto, Team Mamo discusses Neighbours, which is about neighbours who are loud.

(This podcast was recorded on May 12 – apologies for the delay posting!)

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo356.mp3

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Goon
Guest

I’m not sure which is worse, being stuck in a dead theater for comedy where you’re enjoying things, or being stuck in a raucus one where you’re not enjoying things. It can become a distraction from the film, starting to think about the audience and why you don’t fit in. I walked out of Horrible Bosses a few years ago with the latter happening.

I liked Neighbors well enough. My theater was actually as much into it as I’ve seen from a comedy in a long time.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

On The ubiquity of the Modern Beep — http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27308544

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

OH, and yes. JOSEPH LOSEY is indeed awesome. The Servant is one of my all time favourites, if I didn’t have the boy with me (or a wife to feed at home, on Mother’s Day) I would have totally stayed for that in Cinema 3.

matthew price
Guest

His M really isn’t bad either – the giant store looks like it’s right out of Blade Runner.

Sean Kelly
Guest

“Fantasy land where comedy happens” is actually a pretty accurate description of NEIGHBORS as a whole, which I saw all the way though.

I laughed at many of the jokes, but the over-the-top nature of the plot was bugging me (which is a sure sign that at 32, I’m starting to get too old for these types of films).

Kai in Boston
Guest
Sean Kelly
Guest

I’m sure every movie buff that lives in Toronto has heard about this by now (and I’ve already seen some Facebook comments).

While the kneejerk reaction is obviously “this is awful,” I’m going to just shrug my shoulders. I don’t even sit in the middle two rows.

David Brook
Admin

Odeon cinemas in the UK have done that for years. The seats have a slightly different shape and fabric too, claiming to be comfier. It’s pretty ridiculous, but doesn’t bother me too much because I prefer to sit a little closer to the screen anyway.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

My first thought on seeing this was “no!” But live performance venues, especially for plays, have pretty much always had tiered pricing based on how good the seats are. As moviegoing becomes more of a boutique experience, I’m not surprised that movie theatres want to test that out.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Only for concerts and plays, with a few exceptions, it’s always better to be closer to the stage. It’s harder to qualify which seats are better for a movie.

At first I thought it was going to be the center seats. So the column down the middle. As while everyone has a different preference whether they would like to be closer or further away, no matter what row you pick, everyone tends to want to be in the center seats of that row.

Andrew James
Admin

It would make more sense to charge $2 LESS for the shitty seats way in the back; and $5 LESS for the shitty seats right up in front.

“Choice.” That’s the last thing people need more of these days. ยฉThe Hurt Locker

Matt Gamble
Guest

There is a pricing floor for films. Anything under the floor the theatre would have to cover out of pocket.

Eventually theatre auditoriums will be priced like stadiums, different areas will have different pricing with the “best” seats being the most expensive.

Andrew James
Guest

@Matt Brown Please skip F&F 4 and dive right into Fast Five and Six. Then you’ll see arguably the best director or action sequences quality G today.

Andrew James
Guest

PS Fast and Furious 2 (ie the one you liked) is more or less a “Smokey and the Bandit” remake.
๐Ÿ™‚

LOVE that franchise!

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