Cinecast Episode 340 – Quiet Cool


In an effort to keep Kurt and Andrew from having a one-sided argument with each other regarding The Lego Movie, Andrew Parker from DorkShelf guest appears on today’s episode of the Cinecast to deliver the counterpoint… or does he? Either way, we all come together for the undying love of “True Detective” and continue our quest through 1984 with one Freddy Krueger. We wrap things up with a brief Watch List, which includes George C. Scott teaching dolphins to talk. Oh, and we do make some room for George Clooney as he directs and stars in a World War II movie. So there’s that; which apparently is not much.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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Full show notes are under the seats…

 


 

~ IN-HOUSE BUSINESS ~

– Show Notes/Time Tracks

OPENING QUOTE:
Will Ferrell
in
Zoolander

CLOSING BUMPER MUSIC:
“Waiting for the Miracle”
by
Leonard Cohen

 


 

~ MAIN REVIEWS ~

The LEGO Movie | Andrew Parker’s review | Andrew James’ review
The Monuments Men

 


 

~ TV REVIEW ~

EPISODE 4

 


 

~ 1984 PROJECT ~

 


 

~ THE WATCH LIST ~

Andrew Parker
The Monuments Men
Quiet Cool (poster)

Kurt
Day of the Dolphin

 


 

~ NEXT WEEK’S POTENTIAL REVIEW(S) ~


– RoboCop
– Winter’s Tale

 


 

~ COMMENTS or QUESTIONS? ~

Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, otherwise feel free to contact us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

Voice Mail: 612-367-ROW3

We’ll call you!:

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Goon
Guest

Hold up one second Andrew.

I NEVER accused you of not having a sense of wonder.

“This movie is a litmus test on your sense of wonder. Not a pass/fail test, but a Sorting Hat test. Whether you lean to the psychedelic/reflective/poetic, or whether you lean to the idealistic/emotive/enthusiastic.”

EVERYONE has a sense of wonder, and it’s not binary to either of those sides, and there are always exceptions to the rule, but I believe in general some lean to more for lack of better term “adult wonder”, and others lean more to what we normally refer to as “childlike wonder”. It’s all about taste.

PGK
Guest

I can’t remember, did you guys like A Town Called Panic? Detention? Just wondering since Lego Movie absolutely is in keeping with the exhausting pace of those two flicks.

Andrew James
Admin

A Town Called Panic was the ONE movie I decided to skip at Midnight Madness at TIFF in ’09. It looked totally not in my wheelhouse so decided that would be the one night I would get some sleep. I probably made the right decision.

Goon
Guest

My guess is Town Called Panic is probably not for you. Detention is a wild card though. You should give it around 20 minutes and then decide whether or not you’re going to stay with it based on that

Kurt
Guest

I enjoyed A town Called Panic until I fell asleep at the 45 minute mark….

ultimolee
Guest

Opening:
In-house business: 0:34
The Lego Movie: 5:00
True Detective Epsiode 4: 58:34
Aronofsky/State of Trailers Tangent 1:21:26
The 1984 Project: A Nightmare on Elm Street 1:34:50
Watch List: 2:17:30
Next week: 2:54:14
Outro music: 2:58:38

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I have a BLU-Ray of Collateral that I would be happy to ship you for your services doing these SHOW NOTES, Ultimolee. Say the word, and email me your addy, and I’ll ship it your way.

ultimolee
Guest

Honestly no need mate plus i’m still in the dark ages with DVD (i refuse to upgrade again 😀 )

Offer much appreciated though.

Gil
Guest

Tina and Freddy… Also the name of the two characters in The Return of the Living Dead.
Conspiracy?

Jonathan
Guest

How about that five minute long shot in this latest episode of True Detective? Astonishing.

Jonathan
Guest

Now that I’m reading about it, it’s actually six minutes. And the director confirmed that he had planned a few “just in case” moments where they could edit a few separate shots together, but indeed, what we see was all one single shot.

Sean Kelly
Guest

Kurt, let me ask you this….

Would you have rather have a Darren Aronofsky Noah’s Arc movie or…THE WOLVERINE (of which he was the original director)?

Sean Kelly
Guest

And Noah has a budget of $130 million

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

I’d rather have seen Aronofsky make an $80M adaptation of FLICKER, the Theodore Roszak he bought the rights to, or a live action americanized remake of PERFECT BLUE (The Satoshi Kon film he bought the rights too). Noah has very little interest to me of all the start-stop projects (like Wolverine and The Fighter) that he’s been attached to over the years.

Sean Kelly
Guest

BTW, the NOAH test screenings were for alternate cuts made by the studio (who were afraid to anger religious groups). It was just reported this past week that the Aronofsky’s original cut is what’s going to be released (and there were zero test screenings for that cut).

Rick Vance
Guest

Because Kurt skipped over it I will answer the reason as to why the message of the LEGO movie is a bullshit cop out.

Saying that there is no wrong way to do it is ridiculous as a message to be teaching people who haven’t even gotten out in the world yet and is the dangers of the current method of everyone gets a ribbon / trophy schooling etc etc.

Learning requires the making of mistakes which implies there is such a thing as the wrong answer.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

You’re my hero, Rick! Agreed. AGREED. There is too much ‘self esteem’ building in todays western culture, too much of a good thing rapidly becomes poison.

Rick Vance
Guest

I find the assertion that you can’t compare things because one is so good ludicrous. The only way to determine if one thing is that good is if it favorably compares with all the other stuff around it and does it better. They are both movies with a pretty similar goal for audience that is enough to compare them, hell the fact that both are movies is enough to compare them. It is just like the comment Corey made to me in the other thread about being spoiled on too good of CG. That is the reality of the situation they have to deal with the best animated movies just as they have to deal with other movies looking better in general.

I would also argue that there are people out there who are doing fantastic animation other than Miyazaki as well the trailers for SHORT PIECE the Otomo lead anthology project looks astounding, and there is another example shockingly close to the LEGO movie from 5 years ago.

This movie is incredibly fast paced, incredibly referential, with a total bubblegum pop feeling, luscious animation and level of detail and it was Takeshi Koike’s REDLINE a film if I am not mistaken Kurt also greatly enjoyed.

Mashing up references or as Kurt calls it remix culture is still alive and well it is just all about the final product, what you pull together is less important that what the final product of all those things look like, You’re Next is another pretty obvious example that is pulling from a bunch of sources but succeeds so incredibly well because of what the synthesis looks like on screen.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

I did enjoy Redline, but for different reasons, it was unabashedly shallow and goofy. The Lego Movie tries really , really hard to both be super high energy, and also smart and emotional…I think it fails to achieve this. Redline does its sugar rush ‘all-in’ speed quite well. (I still have to get a BLU ray copy of SUMMER WARS…)

PGK
Guest

Redline is actually super episodic and has a pretty lackadaisical pace for the most part. It’s kinetic bursts rarely last longer then a few minutes (its constantly cutting away from the race to stoic conversations between gangsters or bureaucrats for instance).

Love it, but definitely very different to the hyperactive pace of The Lego Movie.

Bowenarrow
Guest

Joking I was saying to a friend that there needed to be more Police Academy movies. When I looked up to see how many there actually were I saw the first one was released in 1984. Would you consider adding it to the 84 project or would you rather revisit other films?

Rick Vance
Guest

As someone who greatly enjoys the Herbert novels (Frank only) and all the enjoyment of the film I take from my foreknowledge of those books, I can not understand how someone can only like the movie.

The books do hold up greatly at least for most people it is the first 3 that do.

Kurt
Guest

I like the first book well enough, the sequels I have no time for however. I find that this kind of stuff when ultra-sequalized or serialized tends to bore me fast. The first book is a clean, if dense, standalone novel.

Robert Reineke
Guest

To sidetrack from the Lego movie debate, I’d like to suggest that people take this opportunity to watch John Frankenheimer’s The Train since Monuments Men seems to be so disappointing.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

I’ve been meaning to watch THE TRAIN (it’s one of the few holes in My Frankenheimer viewing!) for years, but cannot seem to get a good copy. Criterion should get on that.

Robert Reineke
Guest

I’m really surprised you haven’t seen it Kurt as it’s right in your wheelhouse. I think it’s one of Frankenheimer’s best films.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

I’ve been trying to get a hold of this film for the better part of 5 years. Obviously not life-or-death-hard, but It’s been on my radar for some time. I think I shall wait for the BLU-RAY, that is unless a rep-house screens it.

Also been meaning to pick up the Criterion BLU of Seconds…

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

Ooooh. There is a BLU coming in June, 2014 to coincide with the films 50th anniversary.

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=230123

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