Cinecast Episode 317 – The Golden Pan


Large helpings of hero cookies go out to our man Ryan McNeil of The Matinee for filling in for Kurt while he’s covering the festival circuit. Get to know Ryan a little bit better as we turn the tables on him by forcing him to answer his own set of “know your enemy” questions. Then the show sort of organically evolves into a little bit of a MatineeCast like format – complete with star ratings and souvenirs. Andrew and Ryan drool over a few of the TIFF titles that were recently released and answer some logistics questions from a listener. Then it’s on to The Watch List with some Netflix streaming series, Tony Scott and some really bland narration.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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[mp3player width=560 height=76 config=cinecast.xml file=http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_13/episode_317.mp3] DOWNLOAD mp3 | 111 MB
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Full show notes are under the seats…

 


 

~ IN-HOUSE BUSINESS ~

Episode 91 of The MatineeCast (Stoker)
– “Know Your Enemy”

OPENING QUOTE:
Dennis Farina
in
Get Shorty

CLOSING BUMPER MUSIC:
“Holding Out for a Hero”
by
Bonnie Tyler

 


 

~ REVIEWS ~

I’m So Excited
The Way Way Back

 


 

~ SOME TIFF TITLES ANNOUNCED ~

Original Post

– Directorial debuts (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jason Bateman, Keanu Reeves)
– Midnight Madness
– Making TIFF cost-effective (email)

RYAN’s TOP THREE MUST SEE:
Gravity (dir. Alfonso Cuaron)
12 Years a Slave (dir. Steve McQueen)
Can A Song Save Your Life? (dir. John Carney)

ANDREW’s TOP THREE MUST SEE:
Under the Skin (dir. Jonathan Glazer)
Dallas Buyers Club (dir. Jean-Marc Vallée)
Philomena (dir. Stephen Frears)

 


 

~ THE WATCH LIST ~

Andrew
 – “Game of Thrones” rewatch
 – “Orange is the New Black”

Ryan
 – Only God Forgives
 – True Romance
 – Story of Film

 


 

~ OTHER STUFF MENTIONED ~

– Ghost Graduation
– “Community”
AirBNB.com or CouchSurfing.org

 


 

~ NEXT WEEK’S REVIEW(S) ~


– The Hunt

 


 

~ COMMENTS or QUESTIONS? ~

feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Sean Kelly
Guest

While I have films in mind, I don’t officially pick films for TIFF until after the schedule is released in late August. I volunteer for about a quarter of the festival and this year I also lose a day because of a wedding. As such, I don’t want to waste time and pre-choose films, only to find that I can’t fit them into my schedule.

Over the years, I’ve mastered the art of the single ticket purchase, since I redeem volunteer vouchers to see my films. Essentially it all comes down to keeping all options open.

For every film screening I schedule, I make sure also choose up to four alternate picks in roughly the same timeslot, so if my first pick is off sale, I can just choose the next pick without thinking twice. I’ve gotten into a habit of putting together a very detailed spreadsheet each year, which takes MANY hours to put together. However, it’s worth it and (combined with arriving bright and early on the first day of single ticket sales) I usually get most of my picks.

On the subject of Midnight Madness, it is still something I’m getting used to. I made a mistake last year going to a MM screening after being awake for 18 hours prior and I ended up dozing off during the film. It’s also annoying when a screening is delayed for some reason.

With this year being the 25th Anniversary of Midnight Madness, I might actually put in more of an effort to see more than 1-2 midnight screenings.

Finally, DON’T buy a gala ticket if you want to see celebrities on the red carpet. The ticket holders line and the red carpet are on opposite ends of the building.

Sean Kelly
Guest

BTW, single ticket prices are WAY up this year.

The regular adult ticket costs $23.50 for a regular screening and $45 for a premium.

Makes me even more glad I get vouchers.

Markus Krenn
Guest

About the story of film documentary..
I was so close buying it twice already. The plan is to watch it with the wife, so she would get some basic knowledge of movies.
Would that work?
I tried my best in the last few years, but her greatest achievement so far is, recognizing that Moonrise Kingdom and The Royal Tenenbaums are from the same director, because they “are similar in style” (her words) (despite the fact she didn’t like either one).
So for those of you who seen the documentary, would it be good for a total newbie?
Or any other helpfull suggestions on that matter?

Sean Kelly
Guest

The Story of Film focuses heavily on foreign films, many of which you probably never heard of before. As such, a complete newbie might not be interested.

I actually saw Story of Film theatrically when it played at the Bloor Cinema (over the course of two months) last fall. I personally quite enjoyed it.

Nat Almirall
Guest

It’s on Netflix (in the US at least), too. Cousins does tend to make some broad and dubious claims, but it’s worth a watch to trace influences and, as Sean says, get a good primer for many foreign films.

My fiancé, though, does tend to nod off when we watch it, so you may be better served just to watch the movies listed in Roger Ebert’s “Great Movies” list.

Markus Krenn
Guest

“…many of which you probably never heard of before. ”

That’s a very bold and somewhat insulting statement.
German television did a great job educating me on french, italian, czech, russian, danish, norwegian and asian cinema. All those rainy sunday afternoon, that’s alot of movies shown on free tv, when i grew up.
I may have a blindspot for anything from spain. I’ll give you that.

Sean Kelly
Guest

What about obscure African films?

I’m being honest in saying that there will be A LOT in A Story of Film you have likely never heard of. This is coming from someone with a degree in Film Studies.

Markus Krenn
Guest

I’m about to find out now.
45$ at my local store.

ultimolee
Guest

I wish i’d recorded it, in the UK the price is $53/£35

@Sean Kelly isn’t that the beauty of the thing, discovering more films to waste you’re life away watching until the end of time? 😀

Although i discovered Touki Bouki and hated it.

Kurt
Guest

That is $45 well spent. I cannot wait to watch this again. I enjoyed the heck out of it, even if much was familiar, there were so many pleasant diversions and idiosyncratic ideas offered here….It’s definitely a worthy ‘film-primer-in-a-box’

Kurt
Guest

Ousmane Sembene is hardly obscure, he is kind of the Godfather of African cinema. And he is the one that gets the most focus in Story of Film.

Sean Kelly
Guest

Touche

Matt Gamble
Guest

Walk up to 10 random people on the street and see how not obscure he is.

markus krenn
Guest

But to 10 random people even Jean-Luc Godard would ne obscure.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Those 10 random people would probably not be watching THE STORY OF FILM AN ODYSSEY. This doco, although quite accessible, is geared thru and thru for art-film nerds. So that is the context from whence my comment was coming from.

Matt Gamble
Guest

To the average filmgoer Godard is obscure. A fair share probably have heard the name, a decent amount can probably claim Breathless as one of his films, but that’s about it.

For a quick comparison, on IMDb Breathless has 35K votes, North by Northwest has 146K votes, Shawn of the Dead has 258K and Avatar has 585K votes. Sembene’s most popular film on IMDb, has 1900 votes. His next most popular has over 700.

But no, he is “hardly obscure”.

Markus Krenn
Guest

So far i’m two episodes/chapters in and i’m loving it.
But you may have been right Sean. There are quite a few films i’ve never heard of. But i guess their numbers will decline while we move up the timeline.
At least my wife didn’t fall asleep and watching it semi-intrested, even if i had to explain to her what a superimposition is.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

My kids started watching around the 1920s-1930s section. It’s compelling viewing right up until the end.

ultimolee
Guest

Oh god Mark Cousins’ voice :screamingsmiley:………here’s someone who explains it perfectly

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBr52ewUkAE#t=1m55s

but it’s a must see series for any big film fan. Just mind some of the spoilers

Nat Almirall
Guest

Yeah, he ends every sentence with an upward inflection like a ditzy college girl. Outside of that and his seething hatred of Hollywood and weird insistence that art cannot be commercial, it’s a really interesting series.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I didn’t see this at all, he’s focusing on innovation in cinematic language, and tracing the origins of this to certain films. It’s less a ‘hatred’ towards hollywood, and more a hatred towards many of the ‘standard narrative on how film came about’ -> His highlighting chinese actress Ruan Ling-yu as kind of the pre-Method Actor, 40 years before Brando was a bit of a revelation to me, I want to see some of those chinese films, or at least give the Stanley Kwan/Maggie Cheung biopic a shot.

Nat Almirall
Guest

Yes and no. If it were just “the standard narrative” that he disliked, he could just say that; instead, he defines the status quo in terms of Hollywood, so that every time he criticizes filmmaking, makes a negative comparison, or just wants to hurl a downright nasty comment, it’s always directed toward Hollywood (and always vague — I don’t recall him citing a single specific movie, from Hollywood or otherwise, that does something he regards as “standard”).

Kurt
Guest

I know he keeps coming back to the Bauble, but there is a lot of praise for 1920s Hollywood in the doc, all the way up to Busby Berkely. I didn’t see outright hate (althought everyone is kind of pissed at the treatment that Orson Welles and Erich von Stroheim got from the system as directors (not as actors)).

I always interpreted it as merely that there is a lot of cinema not already in the conversation.

Sean Kelly
Guest

I’ve started watching Orange is the New Black over the last couple days. Even though there’s a lot of cliched and unlikeable characters on the show (the pervy prison guard is the worst), it’s so far been watchable enough that I’m now 3 episodes in.

Kurt
Guest

I have a feeling I’ll binge-watch this show in August.

Goon
Guest

You need to binge watch Enlightened first! Ahem, Mike White, Laura Dern, ahem.

Kurt Halfyard
Guest

Don’t get me started on the number of prestige shows I have to get to: The Sopranos, 6ft Under, Justified, In Treatment, Bored to Death, Orange is the New Black, Hjeleford, etc. etc.

Goon
Guest

You can knock out Enlightened in under a day, and it’s better than most of the shows you have listed there, and more up your alley to boot.

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[…] episode can be found here. Any comments about how wrong I am, whether Mark Cousins’ narration is engaging or boring, […]

Kurt
Guest

Fun Q&A with Cousins (to get used to his Irish lilt):

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