Mamo #Three Oh Two: The Mamdarin

That’s how Dad did it, that’s how America does it, and it’s worked out pretty well so far – but how far can you push the comic book movie in the post-Avengers world? Team Mamo spoils the holy crap out of Iron Man 3 under the scorching heat of Ben Kingsley’s sunglassed stare…

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo302.mp3

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Matthew Price
Guest

Here’s the link to the article I mentioned at the end of the show (also posted to the box office thread)

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/06/business/media/solving-equation-of-a-hit-film-script-with-data.html?_r=1&

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Apparently Shane Black & Drew Pearce say they cut out around an 1 and 15 minutes of material. They say they almost cut out a whole other movie out of it. So of course, I’m curious what exactly was cut out and how it worked. They talk about a big car chase scene, but I’m more curious about the character moments. Hopefully, it will end up on the blu-ray and DVD, unlike Avengers which had all sorts of material that only came out on the 10 disk section.

Speaking of which that cut material of police and regular people reacting to Avengers fighting definitely makes it feel like more of a war movie that Whedon often referenced in interviews. However, it also I think gives you an idea what Whedon might do with SHIELD of how regular people deal in a superhero world.

Speaking of which, it sounds like Whedon almost doesn’t want too many references to the movies in SHIELD. That he wants the series to work so much on it’s own, while existing in the same world. So I wouldn’t be surprised if the Thor movie is not mentioned at all. If anything there might be a small reference, but I don’t think it would change the plot of the tv show. That said, it seems Captain America 2 follows up with a number of characters from SHIELD and that if there was going to be any cross over it would be there, rather than Thor 2.

antho42
Guest

Is The Substream in temporary or permanent hiatus?

Sean Kelly
Guest

Based on an e-mail Mike Cameron sent to all contributors a couple months ago, the site is on hiatus while they decide “what’s next.”

Essentially, it was getting too expensive (with not enough traffic) for them to continue the site in its current form. It was a bit of a shame, since I developed quite a niche of contributing news (and the occasional review) for the site.

Sean Kelly
Guest

*SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER**SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER**SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER**SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER* *SPOILER*

The official word from Shane Black and Kevin Feige is that IRON MAN 3 essentially does the same with Mandarin that BATMAN BEGINS did with Ra’s Al Ghul. Ben Kingsley was the public face, while Guy Pearce was the REAL Mandarin (symbolized by the dragon tattoos on his chest during the final fight).

More here: http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/JoshWildingNewsAndReviews/news/?a=78890

Even though I was not a regular comicbook reader, I was familiar with IRON MAN through a 1994 animated series, which featured The Mandarin as the primary antagonist.

While I was back on board by the end, the Mandarin switcheroo in the movie did kind of annoy me, especially in how Kingsley’s character was revealed as a buffoon.

Rick Vance
Guest

Iron Man has always been B or C but promoted as A because Marvel is weird about solo titles.

Even in the Ultimates he was a cog in the team machine and given no more or less screen time than anyone else. Then in 2006 they positioned him as the pragmatic guy against both Cap and Spider-Man in Civil War and you can guess how fans took that.

It largely took the movie to create a Tony Stark that people could get behind in a large way which then lead back into the solo comic getting more fire behind it. The focus back towards team focused stuff has since cooled it off again.

Rick Vance
Guest

Isn’t the technology fetishization kinda a core thing with Iron Man? I get doing it wrong but the fact that he would always be updating and altering what he is doing is part of the guy.

Matt Gamble
Guest

Yeah, I doubt Iron Man has ever even been in the top 10 characters/comics at Marvel. The Spider-man and X books pretty much dominate everything, and Avengers, FF and possibly Punisher might be bigger names. Heck, even Deadpool is probably a bigger draw.

Then of course Matt Fraction is turning Hawkeye into the greatest book at Marvel at right. Who knew that was possible?

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Looking it up, apparently Iron Man peaked in 1985 selling an average over 201,000 comics through that year. Note there is no data before 1980, so it could have done better in 60’s or 70’s. The series dipped in the 1990’s and have gone up and down, but was never the big seller it was in the 1980’s.

In comparison the Avengers had it’s biggest year in 1968, selling an average of 276,951 a month. Note there are also a number of years will missing data and there could have been a bigger year.

In the 1980’s Avengers was selling regularly over 200,000, going as high as 241,966 and as low as 201,600 in 1989. Basically Avengers was selling around 30,000 to 40,000 more copies than Iron Man.

In comparison, in the 1980’s Amazing Spider-Man was selling in between 240,683 to 326,695 at it’s high point in 1985. Of course, Amazing Spider-Man was selling over half million copies in the mid-1990’s when both Avengers and Iron Man were dipping in sales.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

To add to that, I found a link where someone linked to the top 50 comics of July 1980 from The Comic Reader. Iron Man #135 was #10 an drop from #8 from the previous month. Meanwhile #6 and #7 is two different Conan titles. Avengers was at #2 but Iron Man was out selling Captain America (at #14 on the list) and The Incredible Hulk (#20).

Matthew Fabb
Guest

All the data I found via the website: comichron.com.

They also have data for Batman & Superman and Iron Man was actually out selling Superman for almost all of the 80’s, with 1980 being the exception. Iron Man was also out selling Batman until from 1980 to 1986.

And that’s it for the data analysts.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I had an eccentric (but lovable) room mate in University who pretty much only read IRON MAN. He talked about the details and themes of that book a lot. Maybe that’s why I found the films so disappointing, as the RDJ / Marvel Studio films only want to brush these issues rather than engage in them in a meaty way (don’t want to deal with alcoholism for fear of turning off the kiddies?)

The film seems more interested in the ‘rich technology fantasy’ and Stark’s CEO/playboy lifestyle than anything else…

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