Cinecast Episode 299 – Techincally, Literally and Actually

We don’t have much to get into today. Mostly were just shaking in our boots about the expectations for Episode 300. So far we’ve got nothing but we’ll figure out what to do for something at least a little bit different. For today, it’s all Park Chan-Wook and trying to pronounce Mia Wasikowska. Love doesn’t quite do it justice. Be prepared for SPOILERS though. We look forward to the next couple of episodes and Kurt gives brief impressions of his thoughts on Dreamworks’ The Croods, which we’ll talk a little bit more about later this week.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


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Here is the Music Player. You need to installl flash player to show this cool thing!


DOWNLOAD mp3 | 49 MB
if player is not working, try alternate player at bottom of this post

 

 
 
Full show notes and VIDEO version are under the seats…

 


 

~ VIDEO VERSION OF THIS EPISODE ~

To download the VIDEO VERSION (179 MB) of the show directly, grab the URL from the first comment in the comment section below.

 


 

~ IN-HOUSE BUSINESS ~

– Episode 300
– Show notes tweaks

OPENING QUOTE:
Don Cheadle
in
Out of Sight

CLOSING BUMPER MUSIC:
“Summer Wine”
by
Nancy Sinatra

 


 

~ REVIEW ~

Stoker (SPOILERS!)

 


 

~ OTHER STUFF MENTIONED ~

The Servant
Shadow of a Doubt
The Servant

 


 

~ LATER THIS WEEK ~

– Listener interaction
– News and/or Op-eds
– The Watch List

 


 

~ NEXT WEEK’S REVIEW(S) ~


– Spring Breakers
– Olympus Has Fallen
– The Croods
– Upside Down

 


 

~ COMMENTS or QUESTIONS? ~

feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Andrew James
Podcaster. Tech junkie. Movie lover. Student. Also, beer.

9 Comments

  1. I liked the film, but, as I said in my e-mail, while it’s admirable to see an attempt at a neo-gothic thriller/comedy, Park gets really caught up in framing every shot like a postcard. When Tarantino splattered blood over cotton balls, there was a touch of irony to it; when Park does it, it feels masturbatory. Same for the overhead shot of the cake, the vagina-spider, and the ever-obnoxious crying in the shower…coupled with masturbation. And let’s be honest: Nicole Kidman is pretty terrible in the first half.

    And who uses a rifle to hunt pheasants? Much less stalks them.

    Reply
    • In terms of shot selection, I understand what you mean. I felt the same way about SHAME with Michael Fassbender. But for me, the shots in this were terrific. Not so much like a postcard, but much more supernatural in nature.

      Reply
      • Yeah — to me at least, it felt all over the place — I thought it was a comedy at first, and I think there’s a good deal that still is, since it takes him nearly half the movie to establish a consistent tone. Even the sequence where she goes into the basement, though played for horror, felt out of place because I had no idea what it was going for up to that point and for a while after.

        Reply
  2. *SPOILER* SPOILER* SPOILER* *SPOILER* SPOILER* SPOILER* *SPOILER* SPOILER* SPOILER* *SPOILER* SPOILER* SPOILER*

    I had a HUGE smile on my face during the ending of STOKER. There is just something I really like about films with very dark endings. I’m sorry that Kurt considers it horrible, since thought it was wonderful.

    I don’t know if this makes me a sick and demented person or just a fan of genre films.

    Reply
  3. While Spring Breakers has a special screening at the Bell Lightbox on Thursday (which I can’t go to), Cineplex lists the film’s release (in Canada) as March 29 (I expect it to be either at the Varsity or Yonge/Dundas cinemas here in Toronto).

    Reply
  4. The ending works with your take on the movie still Kurt.

    Confined enclosed space (her mind) begins to unravel from the influence of her Uncle and ends with her leaving the space and going out of her mind.

    Also you are correct Matthew Goode reminded me of his performance in Watchmen but unlike Watchmen that tone / performance fits this movie like a glove.

    Reply
  5. Even though Matthew Goode was prominent for nearly a decade now, it’s still weird referring to him. This is because the “Matthew Good” I’m most familiar with is a Canadian rock singer, who was quite popular in the late 1990s (and who I’m still a fan of).

    Reply

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