Cinecast Episode 294 – Gennero-ic

Matt Gamble makes a brief appearance in this episode where he extols upon the virtues of teen witches (and Emma Thompson.) He is also rather confident he knows something about Oscar. Kurt believes only a fool bets against Abe-Frakkin-Lincoln and Matt can Argo-fuck-himself. Andrew discusses the Teal n’ Orange edition of Officer John McClane and his adventures in Mother Russia as Daddy Car-crusher. Another Take this Waltz debate ensues. Kurt also caught an early screening of Park Chan-Wook’s Stoker and despite being under a gag-order, encourages people to flock to the cinema for this unusually stylish blend of Hollywood and Korean aesthetics. A fun and eclectic Watch List including old school mega-epics (Frankly, my dears, we don’t give a damn), Ricky Jay on Henry David Thoreau and dramatic Steve Martin, early Cameron Crowe flirtations ghetto blasters and the IRS troubles, and ends with Andrew trouble with tribulations in his Blindspotting adventures that lead to just a re-watch of Star Trek II.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


show content

 


 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_13/episode_294.mp3

 

#DieHard #Spon

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…

 


 

~ SHOW DETAILS/SEGMENT TIMES ~

Opening:     :00
Intros:     1:03
Oscar talk:     1:55
The Watch List:     24:18
Next week:     1:32:57
Outro music:     1:36:12 – 1:40:13

 

OPENING QUOTE:
David Schwimmer, Matthew Perry, Matt LeBlanc
in
“Friends”

CLOSING BUMPER MUSIC:
“Ode to Joy”
by
Ludwig Van Beethoven (Sir George Solti)

 


 

~ OSCAR TALK ~

– Oscar pool
– Matt on radio Cities 97
– Our picks and other thoughts on this year’s show

 


 

~ THE WATCH LIST ~

Andrew
A Good Day to Die Hard
The Spanish Prisoner
Star Trek II: Wrath of Kahn
Say Anything

Matt
Beautiful Creatures
Take this Waltz

Kurt
Stoker
Gone with the Wind

 


 

~ OTHER STUFF MENTIONED ~

Movie Club Podcast (Another Earth, Mr. Nobody, Bellflower)

 


 

~ NEXT WEEK’S REVIEW(S) ~


– Snitch

– “Academy Awards”

 


 

~ FIND US ONLINE ~

Andrew: Twitter | G+ | Letterboxd | Pinterest | about.me
Kurt: Twitter | G+ | Letterboxd
Matt: Twitter | LetterBoxd | Where the Long Tail Ends
RowThree: Twitter | G+ | Letterboxd | Pinterest

 


 

~ COMMENTS or QUESTIONS? ~

feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
DavidM
Guest

I never agree with Andrew James on anything ever… however…

Take This Waltz was excruciating and just embarrassing for all involved. So overmannered and photoshoot cutsey, and the unbearable dialogue never once rings true. How anyone could possibly defend the ridiculous ‘soulful’ rickshaw dude is beyond me.
The shower scene tries for a no-big-deal vibe, but the way it hits you over the head with it, it becomes a LOOK-THIS-IS-A-BIG-DEAL scene. God, every single scene in this is a colossal failure. The film is insufferable.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Nobody defends that character. He is a very undeveloped, asinine character that provides a catalyst for Michelle William’s characters inner conflict. I stand by that this is kind of a contemporary Toronto Madame Bovary. The ending of Take This Waltz suggest immediate pleasure and ‘freedom’ for William’s character, but not necessarily a deep, lasting happiness. Only that her relationship with the quite nice, if clueless Seth Rogan (Chicken tonite, again?) was doomed due to her unwillingness to abandon her wishes/desires for ‘something more.’ (An rather undefined something more.)

Goon
Guest

“(An rather undefined something more.)”

Polley intentionally leaves Margot’s reasons to be a mystery, and it’s one of the best choices she made. The scene where she finally tells Lou why she’s leaving is so brilliant. She has her dream, then rouses Lou, and then you don’t see ANY of her reasons to him, it’s entirely Lou’s reaction to it.

Goon
Guest

David, if you think neighbor boy was supposed to be “soulful”, you’ve failed at watching this movie far beyond Andrew. that’s just a thoroughly blatant misread.

DavidM
Guest

What are you on about? The manly rickshaw dream boy, the free-spirited, understanding, cool guy ripped from some women’s romance story? The guy’s a stock character, not a recognisable human being.

Goon
Guest

To quote Kurt

“Nobody defends that character. He is a very undeveloped, asinine character that provides a catalyst for Michelle William’s characters inner conflict. ”

Rogen and Williams are the protagonists. You are meant to empathise with Rogen as well as with Williams’ raging guilt. The character of Daniel remains exactly as he was introduced, his character is meant to push the buttons of a very introverted character, from being a dick at the old fort, to pushing her buttons with the drawings, to the popcorn (by the way Andrew, that aquatic center, and a lot of aquatic centers! have a refreshment stand. This is the pool at Trinity-Bellwoods Park in Toronto, a very large park. PS, how the holy fuck did you ever make the connection to eating popcorn as a hipster thing? You’re insane.), following through all the way to the sexual adventures at the end.

At one point late in the film when you realize her freakout by the stove is not with Rogen but with him, he literally fades into the background and disappears with the film. His character is not a true love interest, he’s the escapist/catalyst fantasy which allows her to leave. her character bluntly doesn’t like being between things. He gives Williams something to immediately jump to rather than her extreme fear of getting out of her relationship and being on her own.

Which is why at the very end of the film when she’s on the scrambler, alone, it’s a victory for the character. She got out of a decent but flawed relationship that was crushing her (the chicken for dinner every day thing is a brilliant metaphor for monogamy), she went through the relationship cycle all over again (displayed visually in the film with the sex montage), fun and FAST, tying into the Scrambler scene, going fast through a circular cycle, but by the end she’s experiencing the chaotic ride by her own choice, with freedom, not crashing into anyone, and she’s still smiling.

Daniel’s character is also defined as he is so the viewer (especially one who has been cheated on/wronged) can cast themself in Rogen’s shoes, and see Daniel as somewhat of a villain, the interloper, and he is purposefully thus cast as being hunkier/sexier… and that sex scene goes as far as it goes, in a way to put the viewer who has been wronged in the past through a nightmare scenario. “here is your ex, without you, with a sexier new person, having the best sex of her life.”. And this is usually the reality, when a person moves on to a new thing the sex life often is coocoobananas, compensating or overcompensating for the years of “having chicken for dinner every night”. Daniel and Margot have chicken, and sometimes they’ve got steak, and sometimes they have both chicken and steak. Do you follow?

Dude, you’ve completely failed to watch this film. There’s so much going on and you’ve missed it all apparently.

DavidM
Guest

Dude, stop taking this trite, furiously empty drivel seriously.

Sean Kelly
Guest

People have the right to interpret a film any way they want to.

Goon
Guest

There’s even awesome subtle stuff going on in Take This Waltz about the changes going on with the characters>

At the start of the film the house is in the start of a paint job, red and yellow. Williams is in a red shirt:
comment image

At the end the colors on the house are the same, still red and yellow, but reversed, and Williams is in a yellow shirt:
comment image

Sean Kelly
Guest

I WAS going to watch the Oscars at home (and possibly join in on the Row Three chat), but I decided earlier this week to get ticket for the (now sold out) free broadcast at the Bloor Cinema.

Should be fun.

FYI Kurt, CTV is streaming the Oscars this year, so you might not need to locate a TV.

Goon
Guest

If you’re talking about your pathetic response, I won’t. I’ll take it as a forfeit and asmission you didnt pay attention, though.

Sean Kelly
Guest

Kurt, the tagline “Your Federation Station” was used by CityTV, which owned the Toronto broadcast rights for all the STAR TREK series from TNG onward.

That said, Space (which still plays Star Trek reruns BTW) and City used to both be owned by CHUM, until the company was bought out by Bell and City sold to Rogers.

While on the subject, the cast of TNG is going to be in Toronto in a couple weeks for Toronto ComicCon (aka Fan Expo Lite). I got a ticket for their big Q&A panel (sold separately from the convention).

Kurt
Guest

Ah, Good old Mark Dailey. I remember that now!

Sean Kelly
Guest

May he Rest In Peace.

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