Mamo #282: Guardians of the Internet

We look a three recent releases: Lincoln, which is doing better than expected, and Life of Pi and Rise of the Guardians, which are doing worse. Plus, we inadvertently delve deep into this week’s James Gunn fiasco, and do a bit of plugging for our new podcast, Very Important!

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo282.mp3

20 comments

  1. Spoilers

    I do not agree with Matt Brown. I do not think the film is the about the importance of faith ( the film is too one sided on the atheist side for this to be true), I think the film is about showcasing the importance of fantasy, storytelling, and myth making for humanity.

    • SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER

      I believe the film is actually more open to interpretation than you are suggesting.

      As a religious person, it sometimes bothers me when atheists (which includes my own cousin) ask me why I have faith. Faith is a very personal thing and is actually very hard (if not impossible) to explain to people who don’t believe in it. It is for this reason, I try very hard to avoid conversations about religion with people. Easier to avoid the subject than to risk offending (or being offended).

      From my interpretation, LIFE OF PI tries to answer this “why we have faith” question. Whether or not it’s successful depends on your own personal beliefs.

      Generally speaking, atheists will likely listen to Pi’s father and the “true” story and interpret the film as being more pro-atheism and religious people will likely listen to Pi’s mother and the main story and interpret the film to being about having faith.

      • I should point out that neither of these comments contain spoilers. Your opinion about faith and spirituality vis a vis Life of Pi is not a spoiler for Life of Pi. Comment openly, without fear of censure! :)

    • bextatic

      I’m strongly considering starting everything I ever write from now on with “I do not agree with Matt Brown.”

  2. One big advantage of podcasts, radio or audio plays is that the listener can multitask. I can do mundane things like laundry, washing the dishes, commuting to downtown Toronto and back, or whatever while being entertained by MAMO. Video means I have to give it my complete focus. I’m a busy person and still haven’t found the time to watch last week’s Walking Dead. MAMO has done some video segments with the Substream, but they are small bits that I think are under 10 minutes. When something is 30 to 45 minutes as video, it’s a lot harder to find time to dedicate to it.

    So it’s not just changing the show, but changes how the listening consumes the show and I very much like MAMO as a podcast.

  3. Life of PI wasn’t cheap it cost 120 million to make.

  4. I need one more viewing to determine whether Life of Pi is a masterpiece. Yeah, the beginning drags and the ending has some major problems (i.e, Raja Bell)–but my god is the middle portion freaking, fantastic!

    This film transcends the Oscar-Baity accusations (totally unwarranted, Kurt). Spoilers Spoilers Spoilers:The film ends with a cannibal subplot with Gerard Depardieu. How awesome is that in a kids film?

    • Life of Pi is a kids film?!?! Because it looked to me like an adult drama.

      I agree with Matthew Price, that nothing in the advertising has reached out to me. All the advertising talks about amazing visuals, while showing some very dull visuals with the exception of a slightly trippy whale jumping out of the water.

      I’m surprised the advertising hasn’t tried to sell it with the spiritualism side. Not that I’m sure if that will do much for me anyways being an atheist, but I don’t mind religious movies as long as they don’t try to get overly preachy to the audience.

      • It is a PG rated, family film. For a family film, it goes in so many risky directions. Not even Pixar is brave enough to attempt what Life of Pi accomplishes. Maybe only Studio Ghibli has the balls to do it.

      • Don’t worry Matthew Fabb, the film ain’t religious. It might be spiritual (although one can see it as being secular humanist) and as some have said, about faith– but it ain’t a religious film. It is an existential film.

        • I’ll probably end up seeing it, as I’ve heard enough good things about it outside the lousy advertising. However, I will likely wait for it to be released on DVD/blu-ray or Netflix (since there is barely anywhere to rent DVD’s anymore in Canada). I’m too busy right now and by the end of the month I’ll likely just want to keep seeing the Hobbit in theathres while I can.

          That said, on the flip slide I really would love to see the documentary Chasing Ice, but haven’t been able to fit any of it’s limited screenings into my schedule. I hope it sticks around a bit longer in the theatres.

    • Kurt Halfyard

      I went with my son to go see Life of Pi. (There’ll be a kids-talk-film on that sometime soon). I really liked the beginning portion (prior to the boat) even if they skimmed along too fast to get to the boat. I enjoyed the film overall (particularly watching Irfan Khan do his domestic-Montreal cooking thing) but also interpreted it as a ‘we process things thru narrative, and while we believe the worst in people, we’d rather hear fantasy stories than pragmatic-humanity-sucks stories. Hence Religion. The movie is far more pro-religion than it is against, but it keeps things down the middle enough that if you want to just read ‘story’ instead of ‘faith’ or ‘coping mechanism’ vs. ‘reality’ then you can take any of that away also.

      And it’s not quite Speed Racer, but I did find the CGI transitions between story telling and story-spun to be rather clumsy and cheap looking. That is probalby my personal aesthetic hang-up.

      Over-all I quite like Life of Pi, but 36 hours later, it was barely in my brain anymore.

      To go to Matt’s point, I think Kon-Tiki is a better film also. I liked Kon-Tiki more than he did though.

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