Cinecast Episode 281 – Bromancing the Stone

Welcome to the next evolution of the Row Three Cinecast; and it is good. We call this little something, “video”. That’s right, this week Andrew and Kurt decided to try a little experiment and go face to face, using the higher bandwidth and Google technology that the 21st century has afforded us and actually video chat live for listeners viewers to see in all of its potential folly. You can see the embedded video of the entire show below or head over to the Tubes of You and watch a much larger (and potentially scarier) version of the show. Unfortunately, Spielberg did not succeed in figured out what exactly he wanted to do with his latest picture, Lincoln. We discuss what is good (even great) and how the high points are completely undermined, at length – beware of SPOILERS! After this it is on to a most difficult grading task with this weeks homework and a very short (and very positive) segment on The Watch List which includes the “in theaters now” mention of the very divisive HOLY MOTORS, a time traveling romance, the excellence that is always Frankenheimer/Mamet and a revisit of an older Coen Brothers movie that gives away a big joke in the one-sheet. So the experiment turned out most triumphantly and you can look forward to more of the video versions of the show from now on.

 
As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

All the goods are under the seats…


show content


 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_12/episode_281.mp3

We also have a video version this week!

 

To view/edit the full show notes, please visit the Wiki:

 


 

~ SHOW DETAILS/SEGMENT TIMES ~

Opening:     :00
In-house business/voice mail:     1:20
LINCOLN (SPOILERS!):     7:59
Homework Grading:     42:17
The Watch List:     1:15:15
Homework Assignment:     1:54:58
Closing thoughts/Next week:     1:57:50
Outro music:     2:02:49 – 2:05:34

 


 

~ FIND US ONLINE ~

Andrew: Twitter | G+ | Letterboxd | Pinterest | about.me
Kurt: Twitter | G+ | Letterboxd
Matt: Twitter | LetterBoxd | Where the Long Tail Ends
RowThree: Twitter | G+ | Letterboxd | Pinterest

 


 

~ COMMENTS or QUESTIONS? ~

feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Sean Kelly
Guest

I watched a couple minutes of the video and have to say it’s an interesting idea. Reminds me of the TWIT Netcast Network (http://www.twit.tv), which streams live shows daily, before releasing them as both audio and video podcasts (actually the new Cinecast intro reminds me of TWIT as well).

That said, I’ll probably stick with the audio (though using Google Hangouts for possible panel discussions might be interesting).

Andrew James
Admin

Reminds you of TWIT? Hmm. Must be a coincidence. I’ve never heard of that show. 🙂

The Het
Guest

In my voicemail I mistakenly said that they constantly showed Brad Dourif’s 12″ cock in the movie, Shadowboxer. I meant Stephen Dorff’s 12″ cock. Sorry for the confusion.

antho42
Guest

Wow. Kurt is now on the anti-Ang Lee camp. What is next, Rot coming to the conclusion that Noah Baumbach s a sub-par filmmaker.

PS– Kurt, do not forget to watch The Skin I Live In.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I feel that Lust, Caution was the turning point for my relationship with Ang Lee for which all enthusiasm for future projects was gone.

(and yes, I consider myself a big fan of Hulk, Ride With The Devil and Brokeback Mountain even though they don’t quite have the perfect-cinemaness(tm) of The Ice Storm, EatDrinkManWoman and CTHD)

antho42
Guest

I do not know, Kurt, I find your argument to be very irrational. I mean, you still watch new Danny Boyle’s films even after his misstep with Slum Dog Millionaire. You also still watch new Michael Winterbom’s films even though you did not like 9 Songs.

And it is not like Lust, Caution is a complete hack/Oscar-baity film. Lee always tries to do a different type of film (he never plays it safe); he is bound to release a complete misfire with his approach to filmaking.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I agree that Lee never plays it safe (we’ll ignore Taking Woodstock for the moment), nevertheless I have just not been interested in what he has been playing.

In terms of SlumDog, well, I was immediately interested in 127 Hours after, and likewise with Winterbottom (who has since made another bad film: the TV-doc version of Naomi Klein’s THE SHOCK DOCTRINE is not good at all) yet most of the other films he has been making have looked interesting, or appealed to me otherwise.

What I’m saying that this is no particular ‘formula’ to how I filter what I’m excited about and what I give the benefit of the doubt to. It’s a simple case-by-case basis.

Consider that I wouldn’t touch WarHorse with a 200km pole (and still won’t), but I did manage to work up the will to bother with Lincoln.

I’m a conundrum.

Gerry
Guest

I thought The Skin I live In was a bit meh.

Almodovar re-treaded ground he covered in Talk To Her, which I liked much more, plus I saw the ‘surprises’ in Skin coming from several miles away.

I thought his best recent film was Volver. (Generally I’m a huge Almodovar fan).

Re the video feed, you should provide it as a download.

Andrew James
Admin

Yes, love Volver. Skin I Live In is my favorite Almodovar film at this point though.

As for providing the show as a download, ask and you shall receive. It will be live within the hour for download on iTunes or whatever podcast hosting service you use (I think).

Gerry
Guest

What do you think about Almodovar covering the same ground / theme as he did in Talk To Her?

Since Hollywood has generally axed mid budget films I’m reliant on the output from other countries to fill the interesting film gap.

When people like Almodovar start covering the same ground, maybe because he’s running out of ideas, that’s not a good thing for me.

You should make all podcasts available as video and audio. I’d like to see Gamble bust a blood vessel when he goes off on one, rather than just hear it.

Andrew James
Admin

I’ll respond to the Almodovar stuff later. Gotta cruise for Thanksgiving feast.

As for the show, I’ve discovered lots of goodies. All future show are as of now, planning to be in both audio and visual format. Video format will from here on out be live and available on RowThree as a YouTube video almost immediately.

Andrew James
Admin

Taking a bit longer than I thought. It’s a huge file and my network speeds at work aren’t exactly blazing. It will be up soon though.

Jandy Hardesty
Guest

Re: Robert’s homework. The William Castle series at LA’s Cinefamily two years ago is still one of my favorite moviegoing experiences ever. So you get an A from me. 🙂

Jandy Hardesty
Guest

Not only is Kirk Douglas still alive, but he’s been a guest at the last two TCM Festivals. He speaks with difficulty since his stroke a few years back, but he can still be understood, and he’s got a great attitude about life, his career, and everything. We saw him introduce 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea this year and Spartacus last year, and it was pretty tremendous. I think he’s also done guest appearances for retrospectives at the American Cinematheque over the last year or two, but I haven’t been to any of those.

Sean Kelly
Guest

Why do you have to be so specific! I thought up of a GREAT bullet removal scene, but I can’t submit it because it’s not a SELF removal.

Nat Almirall
Guest

Kurt, have you ever actually been to the Alamo Drafthouse? I’ve never had a problem with the servers interrupting the show — they’re discreet, silent, the orders are written on paper stubs and then placed in a notch on the table in front of you, and the tiers are spaced so as to not have them walking in your line of sight. And the food is good.

Kurt
Guest

No, I’ve not been. I’m sure judging by their ethos that they are as discreet as possible, but as a movie patron, I get distracted just having someone get up and go to the washroom, or have the theatre employees come thru the auditorium to check off their chart that the movie is in focus or whatever, so I imagine that I am particularly sensitive to this. I have been to the CarolinaCinemas in North Carolina which has in-cinema service where they use a very dim glow-stick at the end of the aisle to have the server bring food when it is ready to the patron, but no, I have not actually experienced it having never been in any of the drafthouse locations.

One other thing. Other than popcorn, I find the SMELL of food highly distracting…this includes hotdogs, nachos and NewYorkFries in the auditorium.

Nat Almirall
Guest

This guy. This guy. Seriously.

Aren’t you also the one who defends the theatre-going experience? I don’t think the AD experience is as disruptive as you’re characterizing it.

Kurt
Guest

I’m not characterizing it that way for EVERYONE, this is my own personal tick or hang-up. The above comment was completely my preference.

There is a cinema in toronto that has a film program that allows ZERO food into their screenings. While I’m certainly not for a blanket policy against eating in the cinema, am happiest when it is just beverages (Wine and Beer are a plus!) I’m happiest with no rattling food wrappers or extreme odours in the audience, but I’d never FORCE a cinema to adopt this policy when they are in the business of selling junkfood.

Sean Kelly
Guest

I rarely get food at the movies and when I do, it’s usually finished before the film even starts (or, in the case of popcorn, within the first half hour).

Nat Almirall
Guest

I thought that odor was part of the theatre — are you telling me your Canadian movies don’t have the mandatory lap dances?

Kurt
Guest

There are some theatres on Yonge St. that do that, Yes.

Matt Gamble
Guest

Kurt, I have it on good authority that when you sneak in pine nuts and Chinese food that you eat with your mouth open.

Andrew James
Admin

I love the smell of older theaters. This is part of the reason I dig on these theaters that don’t offer the “ultimate” experience these days. The big corporate monstrocities with their HUGE screens and stadium seating and volume turned up to 12 are fine for some people. I like the discreet, older theaters with arcade games in the lobby and the hideous carpeting with planets and stars and stripes in trippy colors. I like the 80’s feel of going to the theaters. Ya know, because that’s how old I am.

Andrew James
Admin

As for food in theaters, there are theaters in this area that do that. I don’t mind. People go there specifically for that experience.

If I’m going into a theater KNOWING that that is what they do there, I’m fine with it. I’m going there because I too want to order a pizza and a pitcher of beer. No different than watching a movie at home – except the huge screen and people serve me the food rather than cooking it. I’m all for it as long as that’s the reason I chose that theater on that particular night/day.

Jandy Hardesty
Guest

Agreed with Nat on this point – I was apprehensive the first time I went to the Drafthouse, but you barely even register the wait staff coming and going because they’re really good at what they do and also the spacing on the seats vs. the walkways are such that they’re never in front of the screen (as opposed to people getting up to go to the bathroom in a regular theatre).

I love the themes they have for the food, too, that go along with the movies they’re showing. Like when I was there last, the Coens True Grit was playing and they had a southern/western meal centered on “true grits.” They put thought into it. Obviously, none of this may affect Kurt at all given his personal disinclination for food and odors on theatres, but for anyone else out there unsure about the Drafthouse experience, it’s pretty amazing.

I just hope the rumors of them opening one in LA come true sooner rather than later.

Kurt
Guest

There were (are) rumblings of an Alamo-Toronto. I spoke with Tim League on two different occasions in August/September this year and mentioned that there is an abandoned 30-plex cinema (Former AMC) just outside the Toronto to which he laughed both times….TOO BIG for sure.

There are other derelict cinema houses in toronto though, so I hope it happens. God knows that folks in this city love going to the movies, but there is also a LOT of competition in this city for booking rights and such. I’m happy to see Non-Cineplex cinemas thriving (as we are on very small step from a corporate monopoly in Multiplex Screens here) however, and they usually get my business if the experience is good (The Bloor, Lightbox, The Royal, The Revue, etc.)

Sean Kelly
Guest

Despite some controversy over its management, the Humber Cinema in west end of Toronto has been getting a lot of business from me since it reopened in early 2011.

Heck, I’ve even been neglecting the Cineplex Queensway cinema, which used to be my primary cinema, but I now only go to it periodically (the last time being in June).

Jay C.
Guest

Just have to chime in on Kurt’s no food policy.

What you are about to read is an eyewitness account.

On multiple occasions during TIFF I have sat beside Mr. Halfyard as he has chowed down on a number of food items from various take out containers (often emitting a delightful combination of odours). I’ve also sat beside him as he’s fiddled with some sort of snack food contained within a “crinkly” wrapper (it was during The Master and it seemed like it was a bag of nuts or some other healthy snack alternative). Luckily, he was gracious enough to have saved me a seat that night so I was too in love with him to care much.

In short, it sounds to me like there’s an exception to Kurt’s no food rule…it only applies to people who eat food that he doesn’t like (or finds morally reprehensible) and it doesn’t apply to himself as long as it’s convenient for him to chow down in a crowded theatre. Festival scheduling is no excuse! BOOM! EAT IT HALFYARD (just not in a theatre).

Do you deny these claims Mr.Halfyard? DON’T WAIT FOR THE TRANSLATION, ANSWER ME NOW!!!!

Sorry Kurt! Gotta call you on that bud! 😉 I’m now entering the witness protection program forever.

Kurt
Guest

GUILTY as charged by Mr. Poutine-Boy.

but in my mild – now exposed a 6-tonne hypocrite – defence: It was the final screening of of the Toronto International Film Festival on a 5 film that day bender. Yea I had some granola bars (in crinckly packages) and my hunger overpowered me, this was a klaxon-code-red hunger emergency – so I did actually die from lack-of-calories at the end of an intense festival.)

BTW, Granola bars don’t really have that much odour. But could send someone with peanut allergies into anaphylactic shock.

Sean Kelly
Guest

BTW, this reminds me of the time when Forest Whitaker happened to sit beside me and my cousin when we went to see AMERICAN GANGSTER and my cousin (who was the one sitting right next to Whitaker) told me how disgusted he was of how Whitaker ate the fries he had.

Jay C.
Guest

Just want to make something clear…I only eat poutine at the drive in. I think being outside opens up a whole new set of rules (or lack thereof). Just want to clear my name on that one.

In the end, it’s not that big a deal. I just felt like I had some insider info and wanted to make you out to be the Ted Haggard of cinema food consumption.

Kurt
Guest

I have had failure moments. Either of the Mamo Matts could expose me eating a magnificent (and odourific) feast of an entire order of 12-Bones Ribs with Grits, Succotash and other sides at a mediocre remake of Red Dawn (not the current one, the Aussie one from 3 years ago) ActionFest.

Friends have also known me to smuggle potato chips into the cinema. I do that in a silent zip-lock bag (no crinkle). Occasionally i have POCKY, those Japanese tiny pretzel-stick covered in chocolate which might just be the idea movie snack. Comes in a box (like candy cigarettes), easy to eat in the dark, and not messy as the bottom portion of the pretzel is not covered it chocolate. Also goes well with coffee.

I’m not a total food nazi, but Nachos/Hotdogs/Fries drive me nuts in the cinema.

Jay C.
Guest

I absolutely love Pocky. I don’t eat it in the theatre simply because I want to be able to focus 100% on savouring the Pocky sticks.

Gerry
Guest

Kurt,
pot, kettle, dirty. (Apparently)

Goon
Guest

I’ve also bore witness to Kurt with this. I remember some sort of noodle dish he was plowing through during Hard Core Logo 2.

Rot
Guest

Yeah I was between Jay and Kurt at the show, definitely noodles.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

TIFF rules — the exception to the rule.

Matt Gamble
Guest

Jandy, their might be some competition for Arclight coming to LA sooner than you think.

Rick Vance
Guest

Pizza or Fries > Most other food served at movie theaters no wrappers, nothing hard or crunchy just delicious and quiet (most of the time).

JohnO
Guest

Wow. Major disagreements on “Lincoln.” I thought Spielberg dialed back a lot of his reliance on sentimentality. So many scenes go without score. And I never thought they were sanctifying Lincoln. All the scenes with his family showed his incompetence in dealing with his wife and son. The political stuff showed that Lincoln was very much a pragmatist, when he’s often thought of as a idealist.

I also loved that they focused on a month long period in lieu of trying to cover his entire life. This is not “Ray” or “The Iron Lady.” There’s so much more sincerity here.

This sits comfortably at my #2 for the year. Right behind “The Master.”

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