Trailer #4: The Dark Knight Rises

If the first three theatrical trailers for The Dark Knight Rises didn’t make your loins ache with desire, maybe the fourth one will. Focusing more on the movie’s action as well as Bruce Wayne’s retirement and subsequent reemergence as Batman, this trailer has a slightly different feel than the others.

What stands out to me is how distinct these trailers make the movie seem from the previous two. If people were worried how another Batman movie could survive without the Joker (of course it could, but hey, I hear this all of the time), I think these trailers do a good job of demonstrating that in Nolan we can trust and all will be well. Except for Batman. All will not be well for him, as most who know Batman lore have already recognized from these trailers.

The Dark Knight Rises hits theaters on July 20. The only question remains: can it beat The Avengers at the box office?

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rot
Guest

remember when movies just had one trailer, I miss that.

Cody Lang
Guest

I love the trailer for A Clockwork Orange. It almost stands alone and works well to promote the film. Same thing with Kubrick’s trailer for The Shining.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

I just miss the days when I could actually make it all the way to a movie’s release without getting burned out on it. I’m already so tired of hearing about The Dark Knight Rises (and I’m looking forward to seeing it, so I’m not uninterested) that I can’t believe there’s still another month of heavy marketing left to go.

Jonathan
Guest

It’s really not that hard to ignore for me if I choose to – but then again, I don’t live in L.A. like you, Jandy.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

Nah, it’s not LA, it’s the internet. If I’d just quit reading blogs, I’d be fine. But then I miss other stuff. I’m just currently annoyed at how easy it is for publicists to get blogs to post about their films practically every day by just trickling tiny bits of middling info. I’m so glad Row Three doesn’t get into that and mostly sticks to just posting the big things (like trailers).

Kurt
Guest

Hard assets (i.e. trailers or the occasional well designed One-Sheet) is generally how we handle the ‘news side’ of things on this site, or things that drive the writers passion (although I didn’t post the SNOW CRASH news here the other day, despite being quite excited that the writer/director of Attack The Block is going to take a run at the novel!)

It was never the intent to be as inane as First Showing or Slash Film with every bit of breathless casting and whatnot.

I’m a big believer in ‘curate’ and NOT ‘clutter.’

Jonathan
Guest

Word.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Attack The Block is taking on Snow Crash?!? Wow… I completely missed that news.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Yup. Expect that process to take 3-5 years, by my guess.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

I read blogs via Google Reader and see the headlines without any of the content. So anything like the Dark Knight Rises, I’ve managed to get this far knowing hardly anything about the movie and having not seen any of the trailers just the a few images. However, I’m one of the few people that don’t have faith in Christopher Nolan in pulling this off.

Goon
Guest

You’re not “The few”. People are sharpening their knives like they’re on Team Avengers or Team Batman prepared for a big comment thread knife fight.

Jericho Slim
Guest

And are already dismissing Spider-Man. Call me an idiot, but I like the Spider-Man trailers a lot. I’m looking forward to it.

Cody Lang
Guest

Yeah I noticed that as well. A lot of people for some reason think it’s necessary to chose sides for films that will be released two months apart. I could (maybe, maybe?) understand if they were released the same weekend which would be stupid, but why chose sides? You’re shooting yourself in the foot. Just go into both films hoping to be entertained. I agree this Team Avengers/Batman divide is silly.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I’m slightly disagreeing (as most audiences will enjoy most) with Cody’s comment, insofar as many people prefer the ‘grounded’ tone of the Nolan take on Superheroes (crime-noir, mostly practical effects, etc.) vs. the bubble-gum CGI flights of fancy (i.e Marvel Studios).

Both The Dark Knight and The Avengers are the heavy hitting aesthetic-philosophies of each side of the current comic-book-super-hero movie divide.

But yea, 80% or more folks will enjoy both styles, so Team Edward / Jacob crap is kinda besides the point. If there is one legacy of the Twilight books/films it is that it brought that ‘take sides’ mentality into explicit verbiage/slang in the culture.

Cody Lang
Guest

I didn’t mean to imply that the films are sort of in the same style or story-telling camp. I agree Kurt some people who enjoyed Avengers will not enjoy The Dark Knight Rises and vice versa. I wasn’t crazy about The Avengers but I still enjoyed it for the most part. I just think people who choose sides or those who wanting Nolan’s film to fail because they like the Avengers have the wrong attitude. Nolan’s grounded take on superheroes should not turn many people off though. Even though The Dark Knight diverges from the previous ways of filming superheroes I think it’s pretty standard and conventional. Nolan and Whedon’s take on the superhero are different in many respects but not that different to justify this weird knive-sharpening avengers vs batman mentality.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

I think it stems from a general tendency in current fanboy culture to treat everything like a zero-sum game. If you love Nolan’s Batman, you must hate The Avengers. If you love Android, you must hate iOS. If you love Apple, you must hate Microsoft. If you love Marvel, you must hate DC. I know not everyone’s like that, but the vocal ones who are make the “vs” tendency kind of ridiculous. And the worst expression of it is as Cody says, the apparent desire for the thing you don’t support to fail. As if for your side to “win” the other side has to “lose.”

Cody Lang
Guest

Agreed Jandy it is absurd. Interestingly enough the apple vs. microsoft divide even penetrates video editors that I’ve worked with you call for blood if you like to use the software made by sony over the apple software. Ridiculous. I can sort of understand the us vs. them mentality if fans were juxtaposing the avengers with say a justice league film. But, Noland and Whedon’s films I believe both can be enjoyed by most of the comic book movie fans without choosing sides.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

It’s interesting, because beyond the DC vs. Marvel fanboys, in general there was a “team comics” attitude for quite some time. That any big comic book movie would bring in more readers and in turn help the medium itself. Perhaps comic book movies have become enough common place that fans no longer see the need for “team comics”?

Kurt
Guest

Or people have stopped reading the comics and and are only watching the movies now. I am suspicious to think that these superhero films are driving up comicbook readership all that much…

Kurt
Guest

As much as young folks playing video games has probably driven down cinema-ticket sales, I’m guessing that it’s driving comic book sales even more…

antho42
Guest

Yeah, most people of my generation (1989; California) do not read American comics. If anyone does, it is usually manga. In fact, it was until college that I met people of my age that actually read American comics. Weird.

antho42
Guest

Another surprising fact about my generation is that girl makes up a huge percentage of the manga readership.

Cody Lang
Guest

The film industry does have some influence though on the way comics are written. When Captain America came out, Bucky Barnes was the new Captain America in the comics and Steve Rogers was going by captain rogers or agent rogers. Marvel killed off Barnes again and then Steve Rogers became Captain America again. Nolan’s films haven’t had much of an impact on the comics. Grant Morrison killed off Bruce Wayne (and then brought him back) and started writing a new series called Batman and Robin with Dick Grayson as the new batman and Bruce’s son Damian (Talia al ghul’s son with Bruce) was the new robin. I enjoyed those quite a bit. The only influence I’ve noticed on the Batman comics from the Nolan is that the joker is drawn a bit different he still doesn’t look like the Ledger version.

Matt Gamble
Guest

Marvel has been far more blatant with it’s connections to the films, the most obvious being the launch of Ultimate Spiderman to coincide with the first Spiderman film being released in theatres.

Comic sales have been awful for probably 20 years now, ever since Marvel and DC collectively killed the market by courting prospectors. Then you have the shift from monthly floppies to trades pushed single titles sales down even further. It used to be top monthly issues would easily top 250K in sales, now 100K is the bar.

That all being said, The Walking Dead has seen a massive spike in sales since the TV show came out so without actually looking back at monthly sales I wouldn’t be surprised if all these movies have helped push sales up some. I know Watchmen had some huge sales figures do to the film, and I’m sure their are plenty of other examples.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

When Nolan’s The Dark Knight came out sales of The Killing Joke and The Long Halloween went through the roof. DC also put out an original graphic novel called the Joker which was clearly influenced by Heath Ledger’s take on the character and once again it was a huge success.

Even the Watchmen which wasn’t exactly a huge movie hit, moved many millions of copies. I remember DC talking about how they shipped out something like 3 million copies after the trailer had come out. The Watchmen is something that defies all logic for DC, as it has sold many times the comic book audience.

That said, when there is a straight direct connection to the material it does well. Like the Dark Knight and the Killing Joke, Batman Begins and Batman: Year One. Something like the Avengers where there isn’t any direct connection doesn’t quite get the same bump. However, the (SPOILERS) reveal of Thanos pumped up sales of the Infinity Gauntlet. Actually, I just checked Amazon.com and that’s Marvel’s top selling graphic novel right now.

Meanwhile, Knightfall Vol. 1 & 2, the series that The Dark Knight Rises is partly based off of is surging up the charts on Amazon.com.

Robert Reineke
Guest

While Marvel’s been blatant about their connections, I don’t know how well that’s translating to sales. DC tpbs are all over the Amazon chart while Marvel doesn’t seem to make much of a dent. You’d think that with a Spider-Man film opening in less than 2 weeks that there’d be some Spider-Man tpbs on the chart.

While Matt is right about how much sales on individual books suck compared to historical sales, it’s worth pointing out that DC and Marvel have essentially flooded the market. Back in the 60s, DC had about 30 books a month and Marvel had about 8. Marvel and DC probably release more than that in any given week these days, and sell a bunch of old stories via tpb and digital constantly. It’s a more complicated picture of the health of the industry now. The big unknown seems to be what digital sales actually are now.

Also, let’s not leave Image out of the blame for the speculator market crash.

Cody Lang
Guest

Yeah I forgot about that Joker comic. There’s always quite a bit of spin-off or one-off Batman comics or series that exist outside the DC comic Batman. I think all of the Nolan films pulled from the graphic novels like The Long Halloween and Batman year one. I wish someone would just go ahead an adapt The Dark Knight Returns by Miller, I think that would be insane and hard to pull-off but pretty cool as well. I read the Knightfall series a few years ago and didn’t mind it. Matt F, do you know how Bruce Wayne got back his ability to walk? I remember there being some things not covered between KF 2 and 3. Anyway, I really liked the first knightfall with Bane wearing down Batman. I thought it was a good concept for a story, and it appears like that’s going to happen for this next film. I’m excited to see what happens.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

For me it has nothing to do with Avengers, as much as I’ve never seen Bane as a very interesting character. Huge headgear and a mumbling Tom Hardy doesn’t make it any more appealing. Also growing up reading comics as a teen, it was the Knightfall event with Bane that literally got me to stop reading Batman comics at the time. I saw it as a really bad gimmick event comic, where they got a new Batman outfit as Bane “broke the Bat”. After DC Comics killed Superman temporary, they were looking for another big event to bring in big sales.

So I’m rooting for Christopher Nolan, but have enough baggage with the material that I’m not sure how it is going to turn out.

Matt Gamble
Guest

Same here, not a very interesting villain coupled with a bad taste for the source material the film is possibly drawing from has left me not all that excited for the film.

Kurt
Guest

The villain may not be interesting for you guys on the page, but from what I’ve seen, Nolan has done an interesting job making Tom Hardy be pretty compelling and cinematic. I’m curious to see what the film does with ‘the soul of Gotham’ which is what this Batman trilogy seems to be about first and foremost…

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Now I really shouldn’t comment since I’ve seen so little footage, but the complaints about Tom Hardy mumbling and not being able to understand what he says, doesn’t sounds like he is very compelling.

Cody Lang
Guest

Yeah the Batman and Bane voice combination might be funny to watch and listen to. Both of the main characters mumbling at each other so no one knows what’s being said. Although I thought Nolan fixed the voice in the last batch of trailers for Bane. In any case to back up Kurt here, I think the look and characterization of Bane is interesting. The mask I believe is pumping some sort of pain killer into his body and I’ve also read some comments made by Hardy and he discussed Bane’s fighting style as being “pure violence.” He said Bane is calculated and surgical with his blows, making sure to hit particular pressure points when attacking and sometimes just ripping people’s jaws off. Sounds brutal. But, I’m a little biased here. I love anything to do with Batman so I’ll probably enjoy the film no matter what.

Rick Vance
Guest

I have seen one good rendition or better said explanation of what makes Bane tick that I quite love and it has gone a long way to make him my favorite Batman villain (and a large chunk of why I am looking forward to this movie)

Since from the material about it I have seen, Nolan understands what makes Bane tick and why he never faded away into his decade like so many other mainstream creations of the 90s.

http://mindlessones.com/2011/01/25/rogues-review-3-bane/

Sample:

“There’s a lot of talk amongst the bat-haters that Bruce Wayne’s had everything handed to him on a plate, but these gals miss one important thing: Bruce actually did it. Sure, his money greased the way on his path to self improvement, it paid for all the batarangs and gyrocopters and all that shit, but the fact is, regardless of his fortune, he succeeded in terraforming himself into the most brilliant martial artist, detective, meditator, motorbike builder on Earth. Suck that one up, Donald Trump. And in all likelihood he would have done it anyway, even without the cash. He’s the latent superhero in all of us, and by golly, if it wasn’t for all the grim obsession, he’s the supreme role model.

And Bane’s a direct, but deeply fucked up, answer to this.

It’s probably no coincidence that Bane first reared his head in the early, Image dominated nineties. He’s the purest articulation of the sinewy, tumescent, bloodmusclesweat tendency that presided over that era. And it makes sense that the ultimate self-perfected (bat)man would, eventually, have to confront a bad guy who embodied the most obvious earthly expression of that ideal. It’s Batman versus his fallen, real world, shadow: Bulk Meat. I mean, afterall, it’s not an easy thing for those of us over here in the infant universe of Qwerq to transform ourselves into a superhero. Most of us struggle to get to grips with one area of self improvement, let alone twelve. We become artists, businessmen, incredibly brilliant bloggers, musicians or, for those of us that need the whole world to know right from the get go how dedicated to narcissistic parthenogenesis we really are, musclemen. In Bane we see the triumph of the literal over the metaphysical, the body over the mind, ego over illumination, the flesh over the self. He makes us acutely aware of all of our limitations in that he symbolises the grotesque, cumbersome boundaries of the physical. In Bane all of Batman’s aspirations are scaled down to one, bloated point. We’ll never be more than a bag of sinews, bones and skin, he seems to argue and, in the final analysis, that’s what will break us.

It’s telling that Bane wears a mask that renders him faceless, in that he’s dissolved his humanity, his personality, in a sea of gristle. The guy’s one big bicep, hard, mechanical and cruel. This is not to say that he’s not intelligent – he’s quite brilliant and calculating, in fact – but his intelligence is in the service of his physicality and its implicit desire to dominate. Everything is geared towards the moment of conquest, the moment of breakage, and in that, like the Flash’s no 1 rogue, Gorilla Grodd, he’s a symbol of genius chained to the animal. There’s something fundamentally Darwinian about Bane. He takes the soul out of the evolutionary process (not that, scientifically speaking, it was ever there anyway) and underlines, with the help of a little back breaking, the idea that self-realisation can only be achieved in the material sphere. The mind is just another tool of domination and control, and enlightenment essentially reduces to transforming the body and it into a fist. In this he represents one of our worst fears as a species – that there is no real spiritual progress, only a refinement of symbol systems and cybernetic enhancements employed by a gaggle of grunting domesticated apes. That in the end, we are, and only ever will be, just the most aggressive, dominant animals on the planet. In my summation, Bane wouldn’t understand the source of his power, the venom drug, as a cheat, he’d view it as just plain good sense. What’s the point mucking about with the weights if you can obtain the kind of strength you need to take down Batman by simpler, more elegant, but necessarily more brutish, means? It’s a straight line from A to B in his head.”

The whole thing is quite a brilliant piece of writing about an imaginary character.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Bane is like an extreme case of a wrestler on steroids. Someone with a huge weak point where the battle ends with Batman or someone cutting the venom going to his brain. He is the Hulk on drugs, with an easy weakness and not the most interesting backstory and overall generally a very bland character.

I don’t buy this bit about how Bane is a reflection of Bruce Wayne. He’s a criminal pumped up on drugs. He was put into a very big Batman event comic, otherwise he would be the b-villain that Batman has to fight before confronting the mail villain.

Rick Vance
Guest

The memories of comics not fondly thought of does not leave the best imprint of characters. Regardless of the quality displayed.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Also while on the topic of superheroes, while Warner Brothers is struggling to bring Superman back as a major film franchise, the animation studio has hit it out of the park again with the Superman vs the Elite straight-to-DVD. It’s based off of the comic called “What’s So Funny About Truth, Justice & the American Way?” It’s an answer to the question of how does Superman stay relevant in today’s modern world. Also at the same time it’s a political and social commentary of George W. Bush’s America and the War on Terror. Like good scifi social commentary, it manages to make it’s points without bringing the president or anything else into the story. I will be very surprised if the new Man Of Steal movie is anywhere as partly good as this or the other Superman animated DVD, All-Star Superman.

Chris Nolan has done a great job with Batman so far, but I think the main key to his success, is adapting some of the best Batman stories that exist. Warner Brothers is stupid not to run with this and let the animation studio have all the success. Which speaking of which, this fall part 1 of the animated adaption of Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns comes out. Part 2 I think is out in the spring. I have more faith in that being an incredible movie than Chris Nolan finding something good from Knightfall.

Rick Vance
Guest

I am still kinda surprised they picked that issue to make into a film because as a comic it is a pretty flimsy defensive attack against against the ‘new’ style of hero that became popular. It then took those completely rote stereotypical characters and didn’t give them any nuance and used them to have Superman grandstand over the whole comic and woe is me until he realizes he is SUPERMAN and trounces them.

Personally I am kinda sick of WB Animation doing nothing but rehashes of popular comics with their Direct to DVD movies. They never live up to the original, they never capture the art style or the power of the composition of the page and they draw such a direct comparison to the source material that nothing else can be talked about. There is no way an adaption of Dark Knight Returns can ever live up to it, because Frank Miller was doing things that were revolutionary and distinct and personal and amazingly well drawn all at the same time.

Nolan grabs elements from interesting stories he has read and puts them into a blender along with his style, and everything else to create a synthesis that is completely new.

I saw Year 100(Paul Pope) in that trailer along with the most basic Knightfall material (even though that story is much more than its single panel claim to fame), there are probably countless more because I think Nolan understand what transfers well and keeps those elements and he fills in the gaps.

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