Mamo #258: Get Yer Tickets Here!

The summer prizefight continues, and we’ve got great seats. We grab a patio to talk (more) reactions to Prometheus, the various production troubles of The Lone Ranger and World War Z, and the big changes to the pass-and-ticket buying processes at TIFF 2012.

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo258.mp3

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Sean Patrick Kelly
Guest

I haven’t yet played the TIFF package game, since frankly I can’t afford to.

I volunteer for TIFF, I get a voucher (or 2) for every shift that I do, and I see films that way. Worked out pretty fine for the last 6 years or so.

If there’s one thing I’m hoping does not repeat for me this year is another 8 hour wait in line for single tickets. I got a membership since last festival, so I’m expecting to get a more priority place in line.

Cringe
Guest

I never understood why people give a shit on how much a movie cost to make. Who cares it’s not your money? I know everyone’s response is “Well they could have used some of that blockbusters money to go to making good fillms.” And my response to that is, Your an Idiot! Ever since Jaws Hollywood has been trying to make the next big blockbuster, it’s been 40 years and nothing is going to change that.

If think about it, your paying 10 dollars for a product that cost 300 million to make. That’s a pretty good deal even if it turns out to be bad.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

My interesting in movies cost and money it makes all has to do with whether or not they will make more or fewer of the same. Either as a direct sequel, or the success of a director or anyone else involved, or a genre.

World War Z is the first big blockbuster size zombie movie. If it is profitable, perhaps we might see more big zombie movies, even if World War Z turns out not to be that great of a movie.

I enjoyed Prometheus but had my issues with it. I want to see it make a ridiculous amount of money, because I want Ridley Scott to keep making sci-fi movies and for studios to give him huge budgets to do it. I want more smart sci-fi movies and for other directors and producers to point to Prometheus as an example. Even if I hated Prometheus, I would still like to see people taking more risks when it comes to big sci-fi movies. In another thread it was brought up that David Fincher wants to direct Arthur C. Clarke’s “Rendezvous with Rama” but it is stuck in development hell. Part of the issue getting the right script but the other part is finding funding for it. How much Prometheus cost and makes could effect the budget Rendezvous with Rama, as it is very different from Prometheus but I would say has a lot in common.

I’m estastic that Avengers made so much money, as I want more Marvel movies and big Avenger sequels and hoping Whedon will helm Avengers 2. Also I like that Whedon is using his Avengers paycheck to fund his own smaller films and hope to see more of that. I’m hoping these small projects of his are also profitable or at least break even so that he keeps making them.

Doctor Horrible cost Whedon $450,000 and made $3 million that was split up among the core cast & crew. It’s this low cost and good enough return where he felt comfortable enough to invest his Avengers paycheck into 2 movies and now a new web series (Wastelanders).

With all that said, I don’t give a damn how much Lone Ranger costs and how much it will make because I’m a big of a casual western fan and not really much of a Lone Ranger fan. Those involved in the project have solid careers that aren’t like going to be hurt if it bombs.

Sean Patrick Kelly
Guest

I thought I would also mention that I got a letter this week detailing the changes to TIFF membership, with some levels going up in price (the biggest change being Contributor increasing from $300 to $400).

Looking at the chart, it’s Contributor and Principal members that get the biggest perks when it comes to ordering ticket packages (i.e. they’re processed first), though all members get access to the member’s-only line and advanced purchase windows.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Speaking of success and Hollywood following success, World War Z should have been a tv show, looking at the success of The Walking Dead. A different location each time with stories leading up over season. Sure this would have cut out the big action sequences, but to me the interesting thing was how different locations all across the world handled zombies based off of politics or culture. It had some great horror moments in the book but ultimately the reflection on culture and politics is what raised particular stories to be more than just horror stories. Using that as a blue print, it could go beyond what the novel covers.

As a big budget movie, I don’t think 2 hours is long enough to cover enough ground.

antho42
Guest

Personally, I am tired of zombies, and World War Z was a terrible novel.

Kurt
Guest

I so much agree. (I’m not sure how clearly I’ve made my case against that book on the CINECAST in the past, I’m sure I had a big fight with Gamble regarding the ‘veracity’ or the ‘wonder’ or pretty much anything of substance or quality with it’s ‘back-of-the-napkin-storytelling’

I’m not in the least bit surprised that this thing has turned to too difficult to rope into a compelling narrative (or too expensive to do everything) or whatever is the issue here.

Hate to be the Hater here, but I’m happy that there is a PONTYPOOL Sequel in pre-production.

Jordan
Guest

Hi, whenever I try and access the podcast archives, I get an error message on the website and I cannot get the earlier podcasts. Can the site managers help with that as I am currently going through older episodes and would like to continue. Thanks.

Andrew James
Admin

Hey Jordan,

We’re aware of the problem and even know why it is happening. Long story short, we’ll probably be implementing the archives again soon. Can’t speak to the Mamo! shows, but for the cinecast, you can download all episodes with the following URL:

http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_XX/episode_XXX.mp3

Where XX = last two digits of the year
Where XXX = episode number

Matt Gamble
Guest

I for one support our new pharmaceutical overlords.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Old episodes of Cinecast are now XXX rated!

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

They always were, but we usually prefer to not submit to the MPAA for a rating!

Matthew Fabb
Guest

As someone who has slowly gotten individual TIFF tickets, last year getting 4 and thinking about this year getting more, the system is certainly isn’t very easy to navigate. Still unsure if I should buy the 10 or 5 flex package or just wait and see what the movie are available and what I might want to see.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Has the Matts of MAMO seen this article:
http://www.deadline.com/2012/06/moviegoing-falling-fast-among-americans-entertainment-options-study/
In the US only 3% of those survived say they frequently go to the movie. This was at 6% in 2011 and 28% just in 2010. Meanwhile in the UK it’s gone from 12% to 7% to 1%.

For the full chart see slide #7 in this presentation.
http://www.slideshare.net/EdelmanInsights/dert-2012-deckreportmaster-61112-final-for-public

Internet and tv are on the rise in the UK, while internet is on the rise in US while tv shrinks.

Anyways, I thought this was interesting to throw into MAMO’s discussion about the future of cinema.

Jericho Slim
Guest

That’s why I’m always happy with a big movie hit, no matter what it is (Twilight and TF2, I’m looking at you). In my mind, it pushes back that inevitable day in the future when theaters close down for good.

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