Mamo #223: TV Nova

Special guest star Adam Nayman, TV critic for MSN.ca, joins us on the podcast to talk all things boob tube in our annual television episode! We wander from the best of HBO and AMC to the most popular of oldschool network, with a stop in Community’s seven non-intersecting timelines, as we survey the current state of the nation in TV Land.

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo223.mp3

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alechs
Guest

I really love this episode. I am not big into tv but I really enjoyed the conversations with Nayman, particularly his thoughts on Parks & Rec and Community.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

I definitely think shows that dovetail into tv and comics occasionally are nice to have. Adam Nayman was definitely a great guess to have on this episode.

There might be no Community convention, but until then there is their panel at San Diego Comic Con. I caught it simply because 2 panels later was Joss Whedon that I didn’t want to miss. I had only caught the first episode and yet with little knowledge of the show, the writers and full cast were extremely entertaining to watch on a panel.

Speaking of SDCC, in one of the panels Bill Willingham who writes the DC/Vertigo comic Fable, refereed to Grim and Once Upon a Time as Fables’ illegitimate children. As a Fables tv show was apparently shopped around to the major networks. Several times they were close to a deal, but the network wanted to do things way too differently than the Fables comic and things fell through. However, since all these characters are in the public domain there was nothing stopping from from doing something different from Fables but still using fairy tale characters.

Goon
Guest

re: who is the single camera comedy pioneer that spurred all this forward:

I think you all need to bow down to Mr. Garry Shandling. That’s where you go.

Goon
Guest

One show I wish could be discussed is Chris Lilley (Summer Heights High) and his latest show Angry Boys. Here’s another single camera/fake doc show, and his shows are both a combination of the nastiness/satirical elements as well as trying to get some genuine emotion in unexpected areas. He’s got characters that are almost pure greed, completely clueless, but then you’ve got Gran or Jonah who have their own nasty elements but are also played with an underlying warmth or sadness that elevates every scene they’re in.

CS
Guest

I completely agree with Price in regards to Prime Suspect and Hawaii Five-O (a guilty pleasure of mine). Both are fairly standard, in terms of format, but are far more entertaining than you would expect. Prime Suspect in particular has been consistently good so far.

Nayman touched on some very interesting points regarding both Treme and The Wire. I will have to pick up that book he mentioned. It seems to hit on some of the theories I have about why mainstream audiences avoided The Wire but praised The Sopranos. Granted The Sopranos and The Wire were both fantastic, but I am pretty sure The Wire would have had a bigger following had the “casting” been different.