Cinecast Episode 228 – Over/Under

 
 
Fantastic show this week. Thanks first of all for the one and only Ryan McNeil (aka Mad Hatter) from The Matinee and the MatineeCast for coming on board this week to fill Kurt’s shoes who is soulfully too invested with TIFF to talk to us right now. With a voice absolutely made for podcasting, Ryan can take Gambles punches with the best of them – or just deflect them altogether. We have slight differences of opinion on Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion, but not before Gamble and I take Refn’s new film, Drive ***SPOILERS*** out for a spin around the block. Ryan has quite the TIFF experiences to share as well including some of the lowlights and highlights of the festival so far and Matt caught an early screening of Brad Pitt in Moneyball. All of this plus DVD talk (Star Wars on Blu-ray!) and some other tangents and film nuggets. Enjoy!

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_228.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…



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IN-HOUSE BUSINESS:
– Welcome Ryan McNeil!


MAIN REVIEWS:
Drive ***SPOILERS***
Contagion


TIFF SCREENINGS:
From up on Poppy Hill (Ryan’s review)
Urbanized (Ryan’s review)
Pearl Jam 20 (Ryan’s review)
Alois Nebel (Ryan’s review)
Keyhole (Ryan’s review)
Extraterrestrial (Ryan’s review)
Dangerous Method (Ryan’s review)
The Artist (Ryan’s review)
The Eides of March (Ryan’s review)
You’re Next (Ryan’s review)
Shame (Ryan’s review)


THE WATCH LIST:

Matt
Moneyball
– “Sherlock”

Ryan
Adventureland
A Face in the Crowd

Andrew
Half Nelson
Red Belt


DVD PICKS:

Ryan
Citizen Kane [Blu-ray] – Incendies [Blu-ray] – Meek’s Cutoff

Andrew
O Brother, Where Art Thou [Blu-ray] – Incendies [Blu-ray]

Matt
Conan O’Brien: Can’t Stop
Hesher
Drac Pack


OTHER DVDs NOW AVAILABLE:
Jandy’s DVD Triage


OTHER STUFF MENTIONED:
New HIGH AND LOW BROW episode!


NEXT WEEK:
Mozart’s Sister
Moneyball
Pearl Jam 20


PRIVATE COMMENTS or QUESTIONS?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

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antho42
Guest

Yes! Long live the Mad Hatter.

alechs
Guest

Connection between Drive and Contagion?
Cliff Martinez did both of the scores. At least one Chili Pepper is doing some amazing work.

antho42
Guest

Spoilers for Drive:

The best scene in the film is the David Lynch style stripper club.
I want more David Lynch style action films.

trackback

[…] a little tough. Despite staying in to chill on Tuesday night, I was up late doing a guest spot on The Row Three Cinecast. A 9am show the next morning wasn’t quite¬†what the doctor ordered. It all worked out though, […]

Goon
Guest

The opening scene is the ONLY decent scene.

antho42
Guest

Goon, you are completely wrong.
Good to Great Scenes:
1. The opening.
2. The Driver and Albert Brooks comedic, first encounter.
3. The stripper club scene
4. The elevator scene
5. The scary scene with the mask.
6. Albert Brook’s first kill
7. Albert Brook’s second kill
8. e.t.c

Goon
Guest

Albert Brooks is horrid in this.

Goon
Guest

You know how in music videos sometimes they cast well known actors and they read crappy stilted dialogue… crappy because well, what do you expect, it’s a music video. The actors don’t seem to give a shit because hey… it’s a music video.

That’s what he’s like in this movie.

In fact a good chunk of this movie just feels like an extended music video for a shitty hipster synth band trying to tap into 80s chic. They’ve moved on from the Napoleon Dynamite-ish 80s chic straight into the douchey Miami Vice gaudy fashion and model-robot pretention zone of filmmaking. It’s there right down to the font selection in this film, hot pink and straight out of hair salon.

Goon
Guest

I mean seriously… scenes like the strip club where they’re all sitting so detached and drugged out like they’re posting for a Vice Magazine shoot, and the Zola Jesus-ish music playing at the party that those characters would probably never would listen to. Very quickly this movie passes an acceptable level of style over substance to the point I was completely detached from the film and fell right into the nitpick zone. The fucking jacket, the closing “human/hero” song. The violence is presented in such a way that again… reminded me of the over-the-top douchebag Vice Magazine sense of retro fashion, shock and aesthetic. And there’s elements of the characterization that I hated for the same reasons I hate Malick so much.

It’s been a long time I’ve seen a film I hated so much that I got the angried up blood feeling, raspy throat, as I watched.

Goon
Guest

I don’t know, I’m more and more getting the feeling this character is a blank slate you can put whatever meaning you want upon, depending on how you look at his expressions. But to me he looks like a braindead hipster, he talks like a braindead robot, the style recalls the Vice magazine idea of retro-hipster chic, so I fall into ‘if it quacks like a duck’ territory and think this film gets infinitely more credit than it deserves as far as any intelligence is concerned. Does anyone think this thing really has anything to say about humanity or interaction, simply by nature of this character being silent? Can you really justify that idea by his actions in this film?

I think at best this film taps into some general idea out there of what “cool” filmmaking is, or what a modern badass is, and I’m just not on board whatsoever. Apparently is a thin moron in a dirty scorpion jacket. This film is as alien to me as that band Wavves and as obnoxious as the public image of Crystal Castles.

Goon
Guest

I keep going… yes, I really have nothing better to do today. Slow work day.

I guess what I’m trying to wrestle out as I prattle the ‘hipster’ word around, referencing Vice Magazine… the element of modern hipster chic I think i detest most of all, is so much of the apathy and emptiness towards everything. and it’s all over Drive.

– He stares at people, expressing nothing in particular. They stare back.
– Kid doesnt’ seem to care that his dad is getting the crap kicked out of him
– The strippers stare at violence, glazed over, who gives a shit
– Guy gets his head stomped in, nobody seems shocked or revolted
– Even at a party the music selection is droning and expressionless

It’s a void. It’s emptiness. But if there’s some artfulness everyone lines up to attach meaning and depth to the great void. Sometimes a void is just a void. I think this is a void, but as you know I think a lot of Malick is like this too. Bow down to the pretty flowery void. Bow down to the blood soaked void..

It’s still a void.

antho42
Guest

Goon,
I hate hipsterdom and nostalgia ( e.g., Die Hard and Ghostbusters are terrible films), but I still like/love the film.

Goon
Guest

I’m gonna have to let the rage go, but yeah, when the story is as meh as this, and I hate the style as much as I do… out it comes.

Goon
Guest

Would you concede there are a lot of people ascribing Gosling’s character as having this massive depth and emotion which makes the silence of the film brilliant. Lot of people saying the silence says more than a decent script ever could etc etc, and I reject that outright.

antho42
Guest

It is not terrible, but it is not a great film.

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