Mamo #207: The Mamo Lantern

Here’s the Green Lantern! And it’s likely to become a season-defining miss for the folks at Warner Brothers and DC Entertainment. Plus: we have a split decision on the merits of the film, one Matt yes, one Matt no. Which was which? And what did our waiter have to say? It’s Mamo verité, straight from the front lines.

To download this episode, use this URL: http://rowthree.com/audio/mamo/mamo207.mp3

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Gord
Guest

Save some money, and get a talented director that wants to prove himself with a big budget. I know this will never happen but my vote is for Duncan Jones or Neil Marshall.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

If people really liked the movie like X-men: First Class & Thor have done, then chances of expanding the audience are good. I’m not so sure about a Green Lantern sequel as they are going to lose part of the audience from those who didn’t like the first one, no matter how good the second one is. They better go for a very lean budget.

That said, I’m looking forward to Bruce Timm’s animated Green Lantern series, because everything that man touches is gold. To the point I wonder if he would be interested and if he could pull off a live action DC movie.

antho42
Guest

The early reaction is that Transformers 3 has mindblowing 3D.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Just listened to the show. On the Tree of Life ‘criticism’ or ‘top list’ being irrelevant. It is a weird point to make, because I can see that point (which you guys sort of do) extrapolated to making lists about art (you use songs, but you could easily use multiplex blockbuster films in there too).

You make lists (or talk about lists) to get a sensibility of whom (or what group) made said list, and I believe Tree of Life (walk in the park analogy notwithstanding) offers that sensiblity. The fact that it is such a personal reaction, well, what film isn’t? If I watch Temple of Doom at Age 8 and at Age 30, there will be a different reaction to the film. If I watch 8-1/2 at 8 or 25 or 60, it is as radically of a different film experience as Tree of Life.

I guess I’m just at a loss to say that criticism or critical thought/review/etc. is irrelevant to the film in the way you say it. Personal criticism/reaction is what I want to read in a review, so by that yardstick, a good review of Tree of Life is as good as a good review of any other film. Insight into the film and the writer of the review: great!

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

…How about Enter The Void. I know we agree on the awesomeness (in the proper use of that word) of EtV, yet it didn’t seem to get the same type of reaction that you guys give to Tree of Life…

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I’ve always treated a Top 10s as ‘what film do you stand behind (i.e. #1) and then 9 others you really, really, really think are good. People only do 10s because the number is round, and too many years of David Letterman.

rot
Guest

How do you not know which film you enjoy more? It seems fairly easy to me, and if it isn’t then it is a tie, but it is rarely the case I like 9 films equally. I am dogmatic from the beginning because I am only concerned with the films that affect me, I don’t care about how the list looks, how a film may age, the films that come strongest to mind go first. If it was a bad year I could see a problem, but I usually have at least twenty great films to work from… making the end of the year list is effortless.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

I’ll go back and forth minute by minute, Mike. It’s especially hard for me to judge between, like, straight dramas and genre films. Which one I like more depends on what time of day it is, what mood I’m in, etc. Also, I have trouble over time as films I just saw I want to put higher in my rankings than things I saw months ago. Then a few months later, when a good amount of time has passed since I saw either, I may switch them back. It’s in constant flux, and I’m never sure if I’ve got it right. So I also prefer the “one best plus some more films I loved” approach rather than strict ranking.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

My lists are almost always in flux, but I’m cool with that.

rot
Guest

yes but at the moment you are making the list, it should be pretty effortless to go “I enjoy this movie more than this movie”. I am not saying for all time, so shall it be, but in the moment, yes.

Perhaps the problem for others is they weigh genre pleasures in a way I don’t, and have to balance equally two kinds of experiences… I have no such equilibrium… whatever it is, it has to stop me in my tracks, destabilize me, shake me up. The pleasures of craft for craft sake are so far down my list of interests, I have no qualms picking a favorite top ten… because they are are top ten most intense experiences.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Absolutely, Rot. The lists if they are published/archived anywhere become a snapshot of the time they were made. If I were to look back 10 years after the fact, I’m sure the ordering and whatnot would be difference, this is the fact that I’m cool with.

No suprise, right? Our relationship to specific films evolve as we get older.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

I still struggle even in the moment of creation, because my mind doesn’t process all movies the same way. It’s hard for me to rank documentaries in with fiction films, for example. Or films that appeal on a cerebral level vs. films that appeal on an emotional level. I can rank two emotional films against each other, no problem, but one that made me feel strongly against one that made me think deeply – much harder for me to process in relation to each other. A film like Certified Copy, which I struggled with while watching but loved thinking about later, growing to appreciate the experience of watching it more in retrospect, versus something like Hanna that was totally visceral and in the moment. (Those two films happen to be next to each other on my 2011 list right now – they’ve swapped places several times.) I can’t rank those with any sense of certainty. I’ve gotten to the point where I just accept the flux and move on, but it’s not as facile for me as it is for you.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

Yeah, I rarely manage to complete top movies of the year, generally as it takes half of a year to catch up on the movies from the previous year. That said, when I do make lists I’ve rarely numbered them as with a few exceptions, I don’t find it very clear cut which movie I enjoyed better. I might like movie x for a,b,c and then movie y for d,e,f and it’s hard to qualify which one I got more enjoyment out of.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

antho42, I came across one review that when summed up says Michael Bay has managed to make a movie that sucks slightly less than Transformers 1, but certainly sucks a lot less than the bad Transformers 2, but it’s still essentially a really bad movie. 😉
Since I still consider Transformers 1 one of the worst movies I’ve seen in the last decade (I never bothered to waste my time on Transformers 2), the reviews need to be singing the praise of this movie to high heaven for me to even slightly consider seeing this on DVD.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I echo your experience, Matthew Fabb. I think I was the only person in the Opening night screening of TF1 that was not having a good time, AT ALL! That movie is like chewing glass for me.

rot
Guest

@Jandy Whether cerebral or emotional or visceral, it is not how it got me to feel, it is the intensity of the feeling I rank. I suppose the problem can arise from how well do you remember the feeling, from say January, but if it is great the imprint will be left and you will remember it. The word that I keep coming back to is ‘destabilized’ – you know the difference between being entertained and being taken out of your safety zone, carried away by an experience. For me, there are not a lot of films a year that do this, so it is easy to limit to that amount and than rank them.

Matthew Fabb
Guest

I waited to see Transformers 1 on DVD, as Michael Bay & the bad reviews and bad word of mouth from friends kept me away. About 30 minutes into the movie, my wife and I were wondering why the hell we were watching this garbage and turned it off. It seemed like a really bad sitcom with Transformers added to it. Curiosity got the better of me and I went back to watch the rest of it. When the Saturday morning cartoon had better plot that the live action movie, it’s a problem, but I really dislike Bay’s action sequences which leaves me with nothing.

As a fan of the Transformers as a kid and having read some really great character driven Transformers comics, I await the day for Bay to leave this franchise and for someone to make a decent Transformers movie.

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