Cinecast Episode 217 – Capraesque!

 
 
With no Matt Gamble to be heard this week, we decided we needed someone to take the feminine point of view on the Cinecast this week. Row Three contributor Jandy Stone stops by to give some schooling to the boys on the MGM musicals of the 1940s, Yasujirō Ozu and Agnès Varda. We dig into Super 8, that accomplished and elusive Spielbergian zone of nostalgia known as the ‘Amblin Film,’ and whether or not the Rubik’s Cube was popular in small town America in 1979. Do we think it is a Goonies or merely a *batteries not included? Basically, Kurt continually bags on the JJ Abrams whilst confessing to really like Super 8. We also have a look at the state of 3D as the summer gets underway in earnest, and we might not see eye-to-eye on Braveheart. Lots of DVD picks and a few tears are shed as more Criterion titles gently slip through the tight grip of Netflix.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_217.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…



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IN-HOUSE BUSINESS:
– Welcome Jandy (Jandy’s Meanderings)
– “What we watched” naming contest
– Kurt on FilmJunk Podcast
– Andrew on RotCast (coming soon!)

MAIN REVIEW:
Super 8


WHAT ELSE WE WATCHED:

Andrew
Braveheart
Drive Angry
Love and Other Drugs
The Majestic
Withnail and I

Kurt
Hot Fuzz
Days of Heaven
Brain Damage

Jandy
Good Morning
A Streetcar Named Desire
Pusher
Meet Me in St. Louis


DVD PICKS:

Jandy’s DVD Triage

Kurt
Kill the Irishman
Rubber

Andrew
Rubber
Battle: Los Angeles

Jandy
The Concert
Insignificance (Criterion) [Blu-ray]


OTHER DVDs NOW AVAILABLE:
Red Riding Hood
Jackass 3.5
Hall Pass
Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen
The Makioka Sisters
(Criterion)
Johnny Mnemonic [Blu-ray] The Cincinnati Kid [Blu-ray] Point Break [Blu-ray] Hellraiser VII: Deader


INSTANT WATCH NEW RELEASES/EXPIRING SOON:

Jandy’s DVD Triage

Kurt
Harry Brown (new)
High and Low (expiring June 21st)

Andrew
Black Death (new)
Black Dynamite (expiring June 17th)

Jandy
A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop (new)
Cleo from 5 to 7 (expiring June 21st)


OTHER STUFF MENTIONED:
The slow death of 3D (again) – yes!
The Opening Music of Days of Heaven


NEXT WEEK:
Beginners
Green Lantern


PRIVATE COMMENTS or QUESTIONS?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
antho42
Guest

I am looking forward to seeing the Wim Wenders’s ballet movie in 3D. I hear that it is mind blowing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGKzXUWAjnI

Marcos
Guest

Maybe JJ has the M Knight syndrome. Where he does what he wants and there’s nobody around to tell him to stop it.

alechs
Guest

Days of Heaven is a retelling of the story of Abram, Sarai and Pharaoh. Of course this is a loose connection (“She’s my sister”) that isn’t immediately important given how much the story takes off from there.

In regards to Japanese privacy parameters in relation to film; the High & Low commentary had some tidbits about Japanese policemen being intimate community members who knew people on a one to one basis. They would even go as far as doing annual house visits.

Ms Curious
Guest

Stretch your arms wide open and embrace!

Ms Curious
Guest

Oh wow! Just listened to the Podcast! Jandy you did really well, natural and believable! Your hesitancy actually gave your opinions ‘credibility’. I love how you pipe in all of a sudden wth opinions after a bit of a Kurt/Andrew drawl! Kurt your voice is deeper than I’d imagined, but I agree with you about JJ ‘making the film too intense’.

I like the ‘three days (for the footage)’ scenario’. The waiting….gives the edge! The result…mmmm…didn’t get there, fully, at least for me.

My favourite scene is the military scene where the kids are shot in the background, waiting, kids in peril. A lot of excess. Perhaps too much!? I thought so.

And what about the Alien? Nobody helps, nobody assists? Where’s the ephiphany? Where’s the empathy?

Oh yeah, I thought the ‘Train Crash’ sequence was way too long! Too intense! Too much money spent here. That’s my thought. Mmmm…why are the kids smoking? Not that it matters to me as an adult, I’m a smoker. But kids smoking?

Like how you people say…’It’s complicated.’ I loved Andrew’s line of ‘signature image’.

Loved your thoughts on staying for the credits. The editors, costume designers, writers, etc. all count. Every name is a person, we should respect this and stay seated.

You guys/gals are such an incredible team! Loved the Podcast! Thankyou.

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

Thanks, Ms Curious – some of the piping up all of a sudden is due to the vagueries of recording software that sometimes makes it difficult to interrupt. 🙂

Goon
Guest

Rubber is pretty much garbage.

It’s not because it is weird, or because it has some hipster vibe, or because it is some commentary on film. It’s garbage because everything it has to say or add to the discussion on genre is done within the first 10 minutes. After that it is just a slow, repetitive bore.

If you choose to decide that it being a slow repetitive bore is ‘the point’ or an additional commentary on genre film, more power to you, however for me there’s no entertainment value to be had.

It’s like an actual porn film. It titillates, it gives you what you need, you get off, and then you’re stuck with 70 more minutes you don’t need anymore.

It should have been a short. The rest is just fruitless masturbation.

Mike Rot
Member

I haven’t seen Rubber but from the description I get that this would/could be the case. I am sort of done with hipster winking and post-mod conceits.

Mike Rot
Member

@Jandy Good Morning is the only Ozu I have seen too, quite enjoyed it. The one cultural curiosity I took from it was the use of farting… the sound effect is bizarre that they use, totally unrealistic, and they used it A LOT. For the esteem of Ozu and being Criterion Collection there is an inordinate amount of fart jokes in this film.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Goon is ridiculously wrong. If you cannot take pleasure in the absurdity of this film, well, then…go back to your Judd Apatow comedies. Here is where I stand: http://www.rowthree.com/2010/07/11/review-rubber/

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

Mike, I didn’t get around to mentioning it in the podcast, but yes – it’s also probably the only film I’ve seen where I was actually amused by the fart jokes instead of put off. The unrealistic sound effect is part of that. 🙂

Mike Rot
Member

Nothing beats young Brando, there is a reason many of us compare new talent with that particular spark to him: the guy is saturated mis-en-scene, you don’t need a set, or costuming or props, when Brando is onscreen everything else goes into soft focus. I am surprised, Jandy, you didn’t see the greatness in On The Waterfront. Streetcar is solid too, but for me Waterfront is the goods.

Mike Rot
Member

and I LOVE Meet Me in St Louis… seriously Andrew, Kurt, check it out. Mandatory viewing. Though obviously stylistically different, it does remind me a lot of the endless summer of Tree of Life. There is the whole going through the seasons, the threat of leaving the childhood home. I think it is probably my favorite musical, and yes, better than Singin’ in the Rain, which is a close second.

Mike Rot
Member

Meet Me in St Louis was one of the five films I mentioned in the post Escapist Cinema for Recessionary Times (in that long ago time of recession April 2009)
http://www.rowthree.com/2009/04/30/escapist-cinema-for-recessionary-times/#more-12582

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

It’s been a while since I’ve seen On the Waterfront, but I remember feeling like it was too much of an “issue movie” for me, which is something I tend not to like about Elia Kazan movies. Streetcar is Kazan, too, but it’s much more steeped in character and theatricality than any particular social issue (labor strikes, anti-Semitism, etc.). I’m definitely willing to rewatch, though.

Jim Laczkowski
Guest

I’m more in the middle on this one. While I adore absurdest comedies, but Rubber fell “flat.”

I certainly didn’t hate it but I just wasn’t laughing after awhile. I loved the opening prologue, but the cut-aways to the observers were tedious and unfunny especially once we get to the “last guy.” There were some truly inspired moments, but that ending when on FOREVER. I was somewhat thrilled at the idea of a tire killing people, but even that was repetitive especially with its approach to how it kills people. If it had more of a Raimi-style edge in terms of slapstick and camera trickery, I might’ve been more engaged. It seemed to inundate the audience with its postmodern concept when it should’ve just been more ridiculously over-the-top. Overall, I was “run down” about the halfway point… and just grew more and more “tired” the longer it went on. I’m not opposed to seeing whatever this filmmaker does next because I did find moments of Rubber to be truly hysterical. My friend/co-host Patrick laughed ALOT more than I did so maybe it’s another case of comedy subjectivity after all, rather than just simply not getting it. I’d give it a very mild 3 out of 4 at best.

Goon
Guest

Kurt the absurdity is fine but it quickly just rehashes itself. Oooh the rubber tire vibrates and someone explodes. Funny a few times then its just as boring and repetitive as any crappy Jason sequel.

Goon
Guest

This is the only killer piece of rubber that matters:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fpc5vgi9zbM&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1

and its all in 5 and a half minutes. More fun, more absurd 😛

Nick Robertson
Guest

I have a suggestion for the re-name contest: “Notches on the Bedpost”

Mike Rot
Member

seriously, have Jandy on more often, her recommendations this week are solid. Anyone who loves Before Sunrise/Sunset should catch Agnes Varda’s Cleo from 5 to 7… I haven’t heard Linklater mention it but I would put money on the fact that Cleo was a big inspiration for Sunrise.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

We will indeed endeavor to have Jandy on more regularly.

Marc Saint-Cyr
Editor

I totally agree with Jandy and Rot – Cleo from 5 to 7 is wonderful. One of the great city films AND day-in-the-life films.

Marc Saint-Cyr
Editor

Oh, and i also agree that Jandy should be on the show more often. Good job!

Jim Laczkowski
Guest

Two thumbs up to Jandy for her recommendation on Cleo 5 to 7. I just watched it and can’t thank her enough! I’m also a huge fan of Linklater’s Sunrise/Sunset films so I too can definitely see the inspiration as well.

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