Cinecast Episode 210 – Like Porridge

 
 
This is the cinecast at its most casual (and for our show, that is saying something.) Kurt and Andrew tongue bath Takashi Miiike’s Chanbara epic 13 Assassins after Andrew caught it on the big screen at the Minneapolis/St. Paul International Film Festival. As a stalling tangent, there is an awkward and wacky conversation on time travel paradoxes and taboo sex in Back To the Future. Gamble saunters in late (diva) but then proceeds along with the whole gang to break down the multitude of reasons why we love Jay Cheel’s debut feature documentary Beauty Day. Kurt gets a little too excited about catching Chungking Express on the big screen. Gamble raves more about A Game of Thrones. Drew shuts down Feng Xiogang’s disaster-weepy epic, Aftershock. Not much love for Kim Ji Woon’s I Saw the Devil, either. But the fit hits the shan in another one of those Matt/Kurt arguments, this time, Brian DePalma in light of the Blow Up Criterion Blu Ray. It’s going to be a party tonite, a party tonite, I know…

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


 
 

 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_11/episode_210.mp3

 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…



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MAIN REVIEWS:
13 Assassins


WAITING FOR MATT TO SHOW UP:
– Andrew on The Rotcast with James and Dave
– New High and Low Brow episode at WhereTheLongTailEnds
– Unraveling the paradox of Back to the Future


MPLS. FILM FESTIVAL:
Aftershock


OTHER REVIEWS:
Beauty Day


WHAT ELSE WE WATCHED:

Andrew
Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back
I Saw the Devil

Kurt
Chungking Express

Matt
– “Game of Thrones” (ep. 2)


DVD PICKS:

Kurt
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] – Blow Out (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]

Andrew
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] – El Topo / Holy Mountain [Blu-ray]

Matt
El Topo / Holy Mountain [Blu-ray]


INSTANT WATCH NEW RELEASES/EXPIRING SOON:

Kurt
Cry Freedom (expiring May 6th)
Brewster’s Millions (expiring May 11th)

Andrew
The Scent of Green Papaya (new)
Urban Explorers: Into the Darkness (expiring Apr 30)

Matt
Marwencol
Saxondale


OTHER DVDs NOW AVAILABLE:
The Scent of Green Papaya [Blu-ray] Bob Dylan: Don’t Look Back [Blu-ray] Daylight [Blu-ray] Human Planet [Blu-ray] Blow Out (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] Machine Girl [Blu-ray]


PRIVATE COMMENTS or QUESTIONS?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Goon
Guest

re: Alan Partridge. The Coogan box set has the single season and special of “Knowing Me Knowing You” and both series of “I’m Alan Partridge” among its 13 discs. Considering the price of the set and how much they’d go seperately… you may as well get the set. Saxondale is in there too. Coogan’s Run… Tony Ferrino Phenomenon, etc.

Matt Gamble
Guest

Isn’t that set less than $200 too? It really is a steal considering everything in it.

Antho42
Guest

Yeah, Amelie is a complete homage to WKW’s films. The last scene of the film borrows from the ending of Fallen Angels. Matt Gamble might like Fallen Angels ( its pretty much a genre film) .
Amelie’s ending:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhrYfJIkqPU
Fallen Angel’s ending:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyCBWSD7MwU&feature=related

I agree with Andrew, Faster was complete shit. Except for the the first head shot kill, the movie was completely unremarkable, and took itself way too seriously.

Blow Out will make a great Movie Club Podcast discussion with The Conversion and Blow Up. Blow Out and The Conversion are both pretty much a reinterpretation of Antonioni’s film (which is awesome).

Jandy Hardesty
Admin

Yeah, Amelie is a complete homage to WKW’s films.

I’d say Kieslowski, too. Especially Red.

Antho42
Guest

Not a fan of remakes, but I’m actually looking forward to Miike’s remake of Harakiri ( my favorite samurai film). It must be good, since it is competing in the main Cannes competition.

LeeH
Guest

Good pod guys, loved the De Palma discussion/hatefilled fight.

13 Assassins is indeed awesome but Chungking Express is one of the most overated films of all time. Days Of Being Wild and In The Mood for Love are WKW best for me.

Ashes of Time isn’t worth wasting 100minutes of your life on.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

WOW. That is dramatically close in the Amelie / Fallen Angels comparison. I must watch Amelie again to see if there are any other connections.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

THE CONVERSATION is in my top 10 all times film, easily my favourite Coppola (yes, it trumps Apocalypse Now and Godfather, handily, I might add…)

antho42
Guest

The murder sequence in The Conversation is pure cinema! I still prefer Blow Out though. The concert scene with The Yardbirds — the one that inspired the Nick Cave sequence in Wings of Desire — is astounding.

Goon
Guest

Matt, I got it for 125 dollars CDN

CS
Guest

I really enjoyed Beauty Day as well. I completely agree that Ralph’s personal relationship with others is what is really fascinating. While I understand Kurt’s point for wanting more footage with the daughter, I thought she was in it for just the right amount of time. I found the film was far more interesting when Ralph was talking about his daughter than it was the other way around.

Hoping to catch 13 Assassins in the next few months, tried to get tickets to it at TIFF but was unsuccessful.

David Brook
Admin

Goon & Gamble: Have you guys seen the new series of Alan Partridge web shorts that came out recently? They’re not as good as the actual TV series, but they’re still pretty damn funny: http://www.fostersfunny.co.uk/alanpartridge/

They’ve also announced a movie.

MrRTJL
Guest

Back to the Future: no infinite loop unless Marty 2 delayed Marty 1. Since Marty 2 never interferred with Marty 1 there can be no change to history. This is a moot point given that the Back to the Future form of time travel is instantaneous: influence the past, instantly effects the future. Had he interferred with Marty 1 he would have then delayed himself instantaneously.

Matt Gamble
Guest

It helps to talk to someone who has read the books as there is a ton of stuff that is playing in the margins that the show makes no effort to explain for novices (the relevance of the stag killing the dire wolf for example).

Dragons and dire wolves don’t mean its a fantasy show? Yeah it isn’t showing off magic and orcs left and right but the show isn’t pandering to a mainstream audience so I don’t know why you’d knock it for that.

There also isn’t a bit of melodrama in the show at all. Almost every second of the show so far has been about developing characters and showing their motivations for future and past events. Its also heavily invested in cause and effect with its plotting, which is also something melodrama doesn’t have. Not to mention the show is layered in nuance rather than batering you with bathos like a melodramatic soap opera would.

Matt Gamble
Guest

You don’t have to read it to understand what it is going on. But the show doesn’t spend much time explaining many of the minor details the exact moment that they appear on screen.

For example, which of the houses are represented by the dire wolf and the stag. Or why the term “Winter is coming” holds such meaning and so on and so forth.

The show forces you to think and examine the minor details that are going on because they have relevance to the grand scheme of the plot as it developes, as opposed to most TV which holds the hands of viewers by carefully leading and lingering over every plot point and bit of foreshadowing. And for me this is a very good thing.

mason
Guest

My “new to Netflix Instant” recommendation would be the 1998 comedy “Safe Men”, from writer/director John Hamburg (I Love You, Man). Just take look at this cast: Sam Rockwell, Steve Zahn, Michael Lerner, Paul Giamatti, Mark Ruffalo, Josh Pais, Harvey Fierstein, Michael Showalter- some of them before they were famous. Very funny and worth a look.

Jim Laczkowski
Guest

I’m beginning to sense that I agree the most with Kurt, and the least with Gamble as time goes on (The Conversation is also in my top ten all-time favorite films as well). It’s important to disregard Matt on this one – DePalma is a great filmmaker and everyone who appreciates great cinema should own the Blow-Out Criterion disc.

Jim Laczkowski
Guest

Here’s my question about Back to the Future: Marty went back in time to 1955, then he met his parents. Now – wouldn’t Lorraine and George totally fucking freak out when they see their teenage son, as they raise him, begins to resemble the Marty that helped bring them together in 1955? At one point in time, like once Marty hits his teens, one of them could have said “our son looks a lot like that guy that helped us out when we were in high school.”

Or did they just assume that Marty went back in time to help them out in the past, and in the present-day they are fully aware of what Marty did to bring them together in the past? I was more confused by some of the moments after Marty returns and sees the changes in his parents.

rot
Guest

I was watching Back to the Future last night, and what struck me was that in 1985 the cinema off of the main Hill Valley public courtyard overlooking the prestigious clock tower, was showing porn: XXX Orgy American Style. I suspect the motive for doing that was to show how badly times have changed, the virtuous fifties versus the vice-ridden eighties, but still, that is kind of weird for this kind of film, took me back a bit, as the camera lingered on it behind Marty when he is talking to his girlfriend.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Back to the Future is riddled with these sorts of oddball production design easter eggs.

rot
Guest

Also it is insanely easy to nitpick the film, it is not that well thought out, and incredibly convenient.

Regarding Andrew’s paradox, what he is neglecting to see is that Marty in the Delorean would arrive at the clock tower ten minutes from then (in the past) but Marty overlooking the parking lot is (relative) in the future (ten minutes)… same person, same trajectory just at different points in time. They could not meet anymore than you could meet the you of ten minutes ago (there is no time machine involved between clock tower to parking lot)

rot
Guest

I was sick last week, so only now getting to the DePalma debate.

For a very long time I hated DePalma, for much the same reason I feel comparably (around these parts) less enthusiastic about Tarantino: because so much of it is re-purposing that it becomes distracting and ultimately more about this than any particular story (art for art’s sake). For whatever reason I have watched a lot of DePalma in the last couple of years, some of it for the first time, some of it rewatch, and my opinion of his work has changed somewhat.

I love Carrie, I love Femme Fatale, I love The Untouchables… but I also hate Sisters, hate Casualties of War, hate Black Dahlia, hate Mission to Mars, hate Redacted. I totally get Gamble’s hate for DePalma, when he is bad he is terrible.

I have ordered Blow-Out, have yet to see it.

To me DePalma is an ornamental filmmaker, the same way that Morricone scores are ornamental… they want to be observed as crafted objects, want you to get giddy at the thought of making something more than functional, something that revels in the possibilities of the medium and its sordid history. He paints a bullseye on his chest, it is easy for him to fail. His films are over-saturated in melodrama, more Douglas Sirk than Hitchcock. It is daring you to flinch, to be jaded, to laugh. I don’t know, I have kind of gone soft on DePalma this last year. Occasionally he gets it right.

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