Cinecast Episode 184 – Death Lottery

 
The 4 hour barrier is broken as The Documentary Blog’s Jay Cheel joins Kurt and Andrew on the longest Cinecast ever – you know it is even longer than the previous epic length TIFF show. What do we talk about? For starters, Kurt & Jay examine the Let The Right One In remake, Let Me In (*SPOILERS*), in painstaking detail, and how not to process American remakes of foreign language films. Next we move along for a solid hour on Never Let Me Go (*SPOILERS*) which keeps going on the vibe of comparing source material to eventual film adaptation and why you probably should not do that. More Carey Mulligan talk as Andrew skims and sums up Wall Street 2 with out spoilers. Then, a spoiler-free discussion on Catfish follows, although only Jay caught it, so it is more of a discussion on fake/faux-Documentaries, and ‘narrative-ethics’ which leads to more more talk on I’m Still Here, with a little Last Exorcism and The Blair Witch Project to round things out. Next we move along to the avant garde and barely-narrative Cannes Palme D’Or winner, Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives, and a lot of other films we watched: An overview of the “Middletown” documentary series, a bit of Daybreakers-Redux, a bit of Season 6 of “LOST” (you guessed it, with *SPOILERS*), and more avant garde cinema with Last Year At Marienbad. We also debate the finer points of Steve Buscemi and the cast and crew of HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire.” Finally (finally!) at around the 4 hour mark, our DVD picks round out a show that carried us well into the wee hours of the night recording. We hope you enjoy listening as much as we enjoyed chatting. It may be long, but it is a solid and whip-smart show this time around, although we are biased on that front.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

 
 

To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_184.mp3

ALTERNATIVE (no music track):
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_184-alt.mp3


 
Full show notes are under the seats…


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IN-HOUSE BUSINESS:
Jay’s Documentary Blog Podcast
Cinecast Music
Blu-ray Giveaway courtesy of Magnet
– “quick” discussion on Let Me In remake
Dark Bridges Film Fest a success!
Day ONE coverage
Day TWO coverage
Day THREE coverage


MAIN REVIEWS:
Never Let Me Go (**SPOILERS!**) (Jandy’s review)
Wall Street 2 (Andrew’s review)


OTHER REVIEWS:
Catfish (Mike’s review)
Uncle Boonme (Palme d’Or winner) (Bob’s review)


WHAT ELSE WE WATCHED:
Star crash (IMDb)
Chasing Ghosts: Beyond the Arcade (IMDb)
What Just Happened? (IMDb)
Alu Carda (IMDb)
Daybreakers (IMDb)
“Middletown” (IMDb) / (Jay’s review)
“LOST” (s6) (IMDb) **SPOILERS**
The Parking Lot Movie (IMDb) / (Kurt’s review)
Last Year at Marienbad (IMDb)
“Boardwalk Empire” (IMDb)


DVD PICK #1:
        ANDREW:

The Thin Red Line (Criterion) [Blu-ray]
(IMDb)

        KURT:

The Killer Inside Me
(Andrew’s review)

        JAY:

The Thin Red Line (Criterion) [Blu-ray]
(IMDb)

DVD PICK #2:
        ANDREW:

Perrier’s Bounty
(Andrew’s review)

        KURT:

Merry Christmas Mr. Lawerence (Criterion)
[Blu-ray]

(IMDb)

        JAY:

Frozen
(Kurt’s review)


OTHER DVDs NOW AVAILABLE:
Iron Man 2
Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky
King Kong
(1933) [Blu-ray] “Party Down” (s2)
Good
Babies
[Blu-ray] The Oath


OTHER STUFF MENTIONED:
Criterion Cast examination of Last Year at Marienbad (podcast):
Show notes and download

Mexican Horror from the 1960s

Left Field Cinema’s examination of The Thin Red Line (podcast):
Part ONE
Part TWO
Part THREE

In America (IMDb)
Seconds (IMDb)


NEXT WEEK:
Let Me In
The Social Network
A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop
Jack Goes Boating
Cropsey
Waiting for Superman
Twin Cities Film Fest (El Traspatio aka Backyard)


PRIVATE COMMENTS or QUESTIONS?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Bob Turnbull
Guest

Well, it was nice to be part of a record setting podcast for, like, a week – man, you guys blew the TIFF one off the map.

"but it is a solid and whip-smart show this time around"

What, you mean as opposed to the last one? Hmph! Thanks a lot Andrew…B-)

Kurt
Guest

That was me writing that Bob, and hilariously, I have no grasp on how these intros can be interpreted! No slight intended, even though I do clearly know you tease.

Maxime Gérin
Guest

Am I blind or is there no link to download the show?

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Judy Bridgewater. Kazuo Ishiguro. Judy Garland. Guy Maddin.

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/tiff/tiffnew

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Maxine. It's there now.

Maxime Gérin
Guest

Thanks, Kirt! 😉

Maxime Gérin
Guest

Hey, how come my intentional typo in Kurt's name was corrected? It was a humorous response to his typo in mine! It was HILARIOUS!

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

OK, I get the joke Now (and I'm an idiot).

Mike Rot
Member

I am with Kurt on Never Let Me Go, and maybe its a transference of both of us reading the book, but my experience of the film was that it was hitting plot point to plot point without much lingering. I really really like the movie, but I don't love it, it won't be in my top ten of the year. The word I keep coming back to is 'precious', the film is just a bit TOO precious with its themes and its delivery, I kind of want more messiness in it. Still its not without feeling, by the end I felt the drama of the story, but the impression of the film doesn't last with me… and maybe thats why there is still no review here on Row Three… odd considering how many of us claim to love the movie, love the book, most anticipated, yadda yadda, and no one writes about it?

Its better than The Road adaptation, I will give it that.

Marina Antunes
Admin

Shameful admission: I still haven't seen Never Let Me Go. At this rate, it'll disappear before I have a chance to see it.

Jandy
Guest

I have a Never Let Me Go review percolating in my head, but haven't managed to get it written down yet. For me it's less that I didn't love it (I did, and have also read the book; I didn't have the "too-perfect adaptation" feeling with it that I had with Atonement), it's more that I can't figure out how to talk about it usefully without spoiling it, and also I'm not sure I can get across how it made me feel in words. It's in my top ten right now, and high enough up it'll probably stay there.

Jay C.
Guest

Just to clarify, my analogy on the show was more of a way to explain my issues with the ethics of Catfish without spoiling any plot details.

Also, I agree that the film was quite intense at times. The experience in the theatre was a good one for the most part (aside from a handful of moments that made me cringe). Having said that, I do think some of the conversation about the ethics of Catfish are worth exploring and in some ways, founded.

rot
Guest

halfway through this, but a question for Jay

Have you watched any or all of the Criterion boxset for the actuality dramas of Allan King? When you were talking about Middletown I was reminded of this, not so much because it has the same structure, but the one in the boxset I have seen, A Married Couple sounds kind of like Middletown. I have only seen A Married Couple and it is incredible (watch this clip from it http://www.criterion.com/films/27515-a-married-co

Jay C.
Guest

Yes, I just recently picked up the set and have watched A Married Couple, which is awesome.

Bob Turnbull
Admin

I keep forgetting the King set is already out – they seemed to turn that one around pretty quick (and Eclipse has nothing on deck – I keep hoping for another Nikkatsu Noir set). I'm looking forward to diving into all 5 of those.

rot
Guest

are the other King docs as good as a Married Couple?

Mike Rot
Member

My experience of Last Year at Marienbad is EXACTLY that of Andrew's, I have only seen half, did not find it engaging at all. And I love Renais' Hiroshima Mon Amour, but this left me feeling flat.

Mike Rot
Member

on The Thin Red Line outtakes: John C Reilly gets to speak and Mickey Rourke has a scene, but nothing on Gary Oldman. The Criterion blu-ray is the most beautiful I have ever seen. Now my favorite Malick.

Mike Rot
Member

oh and Clooney has an extra scene in the outtakes too. The essay that comes with THIN RED LINE says the use of Clooney and Travolta in minor roles was an effort to subvert the hegemony of the Hollywood star system… and he also subverts the intellectual, making Nolte's character quote Homer, the least sophisticated of the bunch.

Maxime Gérin
Guest

This is a little late, I know…

I'm not sure I understand what separates "The Blair Witch Project" from "The Last Exorcism" conceptually. What makes one found footage and the other a fake documentary? Both films feature documentary crews investigating occult subject matters and ending up dead. Isn't what we see in both films their found footage? In "The Last Exorcism", the introduction of the minister and the interviews in which he states the (ridiculous and illogical) purpose behind the coming exorcism definitely feel edited in traditional documentary mode, but as soon as the trip starts, if I remember well, the footage seems raw and unedited – I could be wrong.

My main problem with these found footage films is that while the initial concept is very novel and could lead to exciting formal experiments, none of the filmmakers working with it seem to be willing to deviate from traditional narrative and structure. Each of the films feels closer to a conventional Hollywood horror film than the one that came before, to the point where I wonder if there's a point in working in this particular genre other than commercial attraction. "The Blair Witch Project" is still, in my opinion, easily the best and most innovative of the bunch (Cannibal Holocaust contextualized and surrounded its found footage elements with purely fictitious scenes, so I'm not sure if it fits the genre entirely), it created an intriguing sub-genre that has yet to see a great film.

Jay C.
Guest

Here's the easiest way I can explain the difference (in my opinion):

There's a post on the documentary blog that draws tons of comments. It's about Ricardo Lopez, the Bjork stalker. He self-documented the creation of an acid bomb which he sent to the singer and then killed himself on camera.

There are two films that people are trying to hunt down on the internet. One is an hour and a half edit of the raw material that Lopez shot during the months he spent making his bomb and going insane. The other is an actual documentary that looks at the life of Lopez and the events that led up to his suicide.

To me, The Blair Witch Project is the equivalent of the raw, edited for length assembly of Lopez's original footage. The Last Exorcism would be the equivalent of a documentary produced from the materials, including interviews, music, titles and so on.

One is presented as 'evidence'. The other is presented as a film.