Cinecast Episode 170 – There is Smelting

 
A lengthy show this week, mainly due to Kurt finally fulfilling his promise to Andrew to start watching TVs LOST. If you are bored to tears by Lost talk, skip the first half hour of the show. If you are a fan or aficionado, there is a newbies (Spoilerific) take on the first (and a bit of the second) Season. The main review, and a wonderful three-way discussion is had, is Vincenzo Natali’s Splice. There is lots of love for the Cronenbergian slash Frankenstein’s Monster type tale, but also some criticisms. Matt managed to catch up with Get Him To The Greek and offers his thoughts, wherein a Rose Byrne love-in ensues (who knew she was Aussie?) Kurt caught an advance screening of Sundance winner Winter’s Bone and agrees that it completely lives up to the hype (John Hawkes and Jennifer Lawrence are both revelations). Finally, Matt teases Andrew and Kurt with some thoughts on Mr. T and welding montages in the new A-Team movie. Andrew espouses on his theory why Pixar’s Up is a lot like Death Proof and there is some tangenting on Jackie Brown. DVD picks and much, much more.

As always, feel free to leave your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_170.mp3

 
 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…


show content



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IN-HOUSE BUSINESS:
Movie Club Podcast is coming up in a couple weeks (The Fall and The Saragossa Manuscript)


MAIN REVIEWS:
Splice (Kurt’s review)


OTHER REVIEWS:
Get him to the Greek (IMDb)
Winter’s Bone (Kurt’s Review)
The A-Team


WHAT ELSE WE WATCHED:
“LOST” (s1) (SPOILERS!)
Death Hunt (1981)
Up
Jackie Brown


DVD PICKS:

Andrew:
Curb Your Enthusiasm (s7)
(IMDb)

        Kurt:
Shutter Island
(Kurt’s review)

        Matt:
Rappin’ with the Rickster


 
 

BLU RAY:

Andrew:
Shutter Island
(Kurt’s review)

        Kurt:
Happy Together
(IMDb)

        Matt:
NOPE.


OTHER DVDs NOW AVAILABLE:
From Paris with Love
180 South
The Cry of the Owl
The A-Team (Complete Series – Limited Edition Box Set)
Family Matters: (First Season)
Tales of the Gold Monkey (Complete Series)
Nip/Tuck: The Sixth Season
Caddyshack [Blu-ray] The Illusionist [Blu-ray] Happy Together [Blu-ray]


OTHER STUFF MENTIONED:
Inception
Agora
Spoon
Micmacs
Grain on Blu-ray releases


NEXT WEEK:
The A-Team
The Karate Kid
Micmacs


PRIVATE COMMENTS or QUESTIONS?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

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Ross Miller
Guest

@Kurt,

I have to admit my heart leapt when I saw in my Google Reader feed the post of this Cinecast where you'd finally started watching Lost! I've been wanting to hear your thoughts on The Greatest Show of All Time (Fact, not opinion 🙂 for ages – waiting on you watching it and talking about it is almost as suspenseful as the show itself!

I had a feeling you weren't going to be falling over yourself for the show but I gotta say I wasn't expecting you to hate on the characters and the backstory stuff. Maybe it's just our viewing perspectives being differently tuned but I don't see how those flashbacks are bad drama. Sure, the categories of the characters aren't really original (criminal on the run, con man, failing rock star, heroic doctor) but every flashback just builds on the characters pasts and, for me at least, helps round them as real people and not just cardboard cutouts of real people. Are you really not caring about ANY of these characters even getting to the end of season 2? You weren't gutted with what happened to Boone and Shannon? I know you said you didn't really like them but that doesn't necessarily mean you couldn't care about what happened to them on a gut level.

I love the character stuff just as much as I do the mystery, although the latter is admittedly what makes you go "I must see the next one to find out what happens!" If you're after more creative ways of storytelling, that stuff happens as the show goes on. The earlier seasons are more to do with establishing characters and the like. With your reaction to the first two seasons I think you'll absolutely prefer season 4 and 5 over any others.

Oh, and don't listen to Matt or Andrew – the WHOLE of season 3 is great (although I have a feeling you'll side with the haters of at least the first half of it :P).

As you might already have guessed from my response and from hearing it from Andrew etc – I hold my hands up to being a Lost apologist. Even the clunky or "off" stuff I still find interesting and compelling in any way I can. Some say biased – I say I'm just passionate 🙂

Look forward to hearing your thoughts on the rest of the show as you make your way through it.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I really liked the actor Ian Somerhalder in the criminally underrated RULES OF ATTRACTION, and he appears to have not aged a day between that film and Season 1 of Lost. I had no issue with Shannon & Boones' initial set-up, but the show had real trouble filling in their back stories, and they had so bloody little to do on the island (the Sayid/Shannon relationship was BELABOURED at best, mostly laughably unlikely) I was glad they simply got rid of those characters. Now if only they could oust the Junkie Musician and his Aussie Fledgling mom. Every time the story switches to those characters (and in particular their flashbacks) I find myself either rolling my eyes or getting drowsy. There is ZERO remorse when any of these characters (and I mean the whole bloody lot of 'em) fail or die, because they are so poorly developed and put through the 'melodramatic-soap-opera-cliff-hanger-plot-ringer' again and again, they are puppets to the unfolding mystery. And -make no mistake- I like that mystery very much, it singlehandedly is making me plow through the show. The moment of Locke and Jack looking down in the opened Hatch, and all of the 'star into the void and the void stares back into you' promise was pretty swell. But it is all isolated moments. And the characters do not even sweat the crazy ass collection of supernatural stuff on the island until the writers get back to each thread. It's a weird thing. I guess I wish there was more panic in the show, more cold sweat kinda stuff. But that is not happening at the moment. Further reveals about each character simply make everything look less likely and more 'writer 101-ish.'

I'm holding out for Season 4 when the series 'hits its stride' according to the hardcores.

Ross Miller
Guest

Well I guess we just look at storytelling in different ways in terms of character development. To me the flashbacks are great ways to fill in the blanks. These people crashed on an island and we only had hints at what there past was (Kate's handcuffs, Sawyer's letter etc) but I love how they jump back into their lives and allow us to see not just how they got on the plane but why and what type of people they are.

Don't get me wrong I love shows like The Wire and The Sopranos where, perhaps, things are played out a slower pace that allows you to soak in more but for me they don't instill the kind of emotions for the characters that Lost does. For example, when a character died on The Wire I didn't feel sad, I just took it as "that's life" (and maybe that's that show strives to be as realistic as possible). But whenever it happens on Lost I feel a sense of real loss within the context of the show. These characters really matter.

(I'm surprised you don't like Charlie – he's one of the best characters IMO. So well played by Dominic Monaghan).

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Yes, we are clearly the opposite here. For me, seeing the lost of more 'grounded' and less 'crazy life soap opera' people in the more upscale TV shows is far more devastating. Here I just wait for what genre-cliche they are going to pile in next.

Doc marries girl whose legs he miraculously restored!

Cop is shot while pregnant!

Guy is swindled out of Kidney by fake father!

When it isn't cheap melodrama, it's bad racial cliches – The Korean Arranged Marriage and Mobster/Corporate crap, The Iraq War torturer, the African Preacher forcibly turned Drug Kingpin. Ouch -> the more they develop these characters, the less chance of ever being relate-able people.

But the things I'll endure to explore the Dharma Initiative, the Others on the island, Invisible Smoke Monsters, animals living there that have no ecological reason fore being there and the Twilight Zone devils-bargain/poetic-irony that is woven throughout. It's the mystery, not the people, that make the show interesting. I think that was the same for TWIN PEAKS (although many of the characters in there were interesting) or THE PRISONER. (wherein the characters of that show are place holders, but significantly less 'dramatized')

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I really think once they got past the Gilligan's Island (with the new-hook where everyone has a deep dark dirty secret!) origin-aspect of Season 1, they should have moved more into the 'how do we build a new society until we are rescued' in the later seasons, without the flashbacks. That would have been more interested to me, but as Matt says, the show seems to delight in staying in the 'flashback drives the present story' drama. Seems cheap, strangely episodic (like the interminable Law & Order or Quantum Leap) to me, but I soldier onwards on the promise for more tantalizing mystic mystery.

Ross Miller
Guest

Right, and as I said I'm not refuting that the characters are stereotypes but in a way I think that was entirely the aim. To have these types of characters we've all known (the idea of the character originally had to come from SOMEWHERE, right? Why not real life?) and explore them, develop them and make us care about them. I guess since you prefer more grounded-in-reality stuff (and I love that stuff too, mind you) then you're not caring for the characters as intended (I can't believe you dissed Mr. Eko's backstory! He has arguably the best one! :P). And that's fair enough. Both of us are right – it's great that the one show can evoke different reactions in people.

I'll give you an example of how in The Wire I didn't feel a sense of real loss but in Lost I did:

MAJOR SPOILERS FROM THE WIRE AND LOST!

When D'Aneglo Barksdale was murdered in the prison. I was shocked, sure, but did I feel outright SAD or UPSET? No. When Shannon was shot – even if she was far from my favourite characters – I felt like a chunk had been ripped away from the story and it rippled for long afterwards i.e. as it is in real life.

END OF THE WIRE AND LOST SPOILERS!

Characters are the core of the show in my eyes.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I actually liked Hugo's Lottery (again Twilight ZOne episode) backstory, but I wish they told it without all the goofy pratfalls. Played it a bit more real and a bit less comic relief. But I thought the closest to any-way real back-story was Michael & his wife and eventually Walt. Even with the classic twilight zone kid stuff (can seemingly make things happen if he is angry or passionate – from bird killing to backgammon) it feels more real than the bullshit Kate-on-the-Lam story. Wowsers is that not in any way believable.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I think a more telling example of pure real horror in The Wire is when Avon and the gang in season one D'Angelo and Poot off that other little kid in the concrete basement. Ouch, that was devastating and disturbing. The only crazy-ass elements of The Wire that do not feel real is the 'hit-man in a bow tie' and Omar, but since Omar is bloody awesome, Badass Gay Robin-hood of the Hood, it is certainly livable within the rest of the show. Maybe the serial killer plot in Season 5 is a bit much, but then again, it's evoking Stephen Glass and condemning the 'quick and easy' approach of newspaper journalism in the 21st century, so there is that.

Ross Miller
Guest

With regards to Hurley, when you said in the podcast he's in there in a way to be the voice of fans who theorize all day – you're not wrong. The writers have openly said that one of his many functions is to be the voice of fans, throwing in the "Dudes" and "Wait… what?" lines that we would all realistically be doing. I think part of the fun of Hurley is the jokier tone of his story, even though it can get as deadly serious as the rest. If you ask any Lost fan which character is the most fun and the most likeable, chances are they'd say Hurley. He's the character that even if he's not your absolute favourite, everyone likes him to some degree or another.

I think you're in the minority in preferring Michael's story over others 😛 Not that his story isn't liked but he rarely comes top of the list of favourites.

And to me Kate's story is solid – I don't get the hate for her and her backstory. Sure, it's one of the most cliched of the whole lot but the performance of Evangeline Lilly (who, as an unknown and inexperienced actress before Lost, is a revelation) and the compelling writing overcomes that IMO.

Kurt
Guest

I'd hardly call Lilly a 'revelation' – she look great in frayed jeans and can stare meaningfully (and sadly) off into the horizon. But really there isn't much belieavable as a human being in her. Her fugitive on the run stuff is hokey and lame. Her Island love-triangle between Jack and Sawyer is Highschool drama at best. For my money, I'd rather see the Therapist (tail-folk) or Sun get as much screen time as she does. She's a good golfer, so I'll give her that. Beyond that. What? How is she a revelation?

Much of Lost plays into the TV fantasy that the principal players will look great in their 'survivor chic' duds and provide as much skin in the foreground as powder-white beach sand and magical sunsets in the background. These are petty gripes, but I guess the show has to cater to 'pretty' before it caters to 'real.' Which is weird when the show decides every now and again to get actually gory. Part of lost is hamstrung by being a Network TV show. I'd like to see a few of these tee off with a string of curse words every now and again.

Ross Miller
Guest

Heh, I feel like we're having the same kind of conversation that Larry David had with his neighbour in that season 1 episode, funnily enough called "The Wire", where the neighbour says "This is what we call in law a difference in perspective," or something along those lines. You'll get it if you've seen it.

I mean revelation in terms of she's so inexperienced (I think her greatest claim to fame before Lost was the phone sex ad she did or her role as a schoolgirl in Freddy Vs. Jason :P). You don't think she's a great actress? Totally believable in my eyes, even if her story (if you write it on paper) isn't.

I think there's definitely an element of "good-looking people" to the show – I mean let's face it, most guys don't look like Jack or Sawyer and most gals don't look like Kate or Ana-Lucia. But doesn't every show have an element of that to some degree or another?

As for being real, I don't think it's real in terms of taking a step back and looking at it. But in terms of characters I'm sticking to my guns that there stories are well played, believable in their own right (remember, this is taking everything within the world of the show – of course it's not like mundane real life), extremely well acted for the most part and just compelling to watch. To quote Brad Pitt from Se7en – "…I do not agree with you. I DO not."

(Oh and regards to curse words – at least you've got Sawyer's "Son of a bitch!" to get some of your fill 😛 ).

rot
Guest

The hate for the beginning of Season 3 of Lost will never cease to amaze me. That is Lost in full stride (Stranger in a Strange Land aside). I can agree with almost all that Kurt said about the flaws of Lost, but I also agree with Andrew that eventually those flaws cease to matter, and however strange it seems, by the end I did actually care for many of the characters.

To correct Matt, I can't think of a single music montage (outside of musical score) that is done after Hurley's batteries die. Lost season 1-2 seems like an anomaly in lieu of what comes after… a lot of fans pine for the good ole days where characters hung around the beach and things were easier to comprehend, but for me that is the painful part of Lost, and everything I like about the show happens starting right where Kurt is now.

I know I have said this before, but I need to say it again: Mad Men is not that special. Its not bad, its watchable, but I find it incredibly over-hyped for what is a show that comes and goes without making much of an impact on me. I have watched all 3 seasons, and they are slow burns, but compared to The Sopranos which was also slow burn, it offers pretty pictures more than pathos. With the exception of a couple of the female leads, the bulk of the characters are not that interesting, including Don Draper. what it has is style, nostalgia, minimalism, but it is kind of dull. I don't feel compelled to watch the next episode.

Ross Miller
Guest

Although I don't necessarily agree that season 3 is Lost at its best, I still agree with you, rot, more or less that I don't get why it's disliked (nae HATED) so much.

Also I was gonna say what rot said, Matt – there's no many montages like that beyond seasons 1-2.

(rot – remember Kurt is in the process of watching it so don't drop any spoilers and if you do put a spoiler warning. I don't know about Kurt but I hate it when I read spoilers before I've had a chance to see it in the show in question)

Mad Men is a strange one for me. I watched the first 4 or 5 episodes and wasn't compelled to watch anymore. Then about 6 months later after season 3 came out on DVD I decided to go back and watch it again and watched all 3 seasons in less than 3 weeks 😛

I agree with you, rot, to some extent that it doesn't make me desperately want to see the next episode. And that's not because it's slow paced – The Sopranos has a pretty slow pace (or "deliberately paced" as is the fancy way of saying it :P) but I always was like "Oh I'll just put on another one" when I only meant to watch one. It's absolutely gorgeous show to look at and the acting is fantastic. I have to say I disagree about the characters though. I didn't like most of them at first but as it went on I started to care more and more for them (Pete Campbell in particular).

rot
Guest

there are some funny running in slo-mo on the beach montages, but who can dislike that?

I completely forgot about the character of Pete Campbell, hence my point. 🙂

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

It should be (and probably has been) said that the actual score for the show is much like the photography and overall production value -> AWESOME.

rot
Guest

series finale score of Lost is Awesome x10.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

The actor who plays Sawyer is this weird DNA hybrid of Mathew McConaughey and Kurt Russell. I dislike the character (he is ludicrously motivated and written from show to show but the actual look of the actor always makes me smile.

Ross Miller
Guest

@rot,

I think Pete is one of the best characters. He's the most relatable for me.

@Kurt,

Yes, the music is A-MAZ-ING. Michael Giacchino is a genius. His score for Up is utter brilliance.

antho42
Guest

Kurt, if you do not like the characters in Lost, than you should probably stop watching the show. The mystery aspects reaches the Matrix Revolution stupidity.

Matt Gamble
Guest

In 1831 a man was falsely accused of murder. Forced to flee from Canada through the Yukon Territories, he was a wanted, nay, hunted man. He fled in his backwards snowshoes, ever trying to shake the yolk of an ignorant if nice enough mounted police force. This thrilling and oddly compelling tale was recalled in the 1981 film, Death Hunt. Starring Charles Bronson, Lee Marvin, Andrew Stevens and Carl Weathers. Also Angie Dickinson, seemingly on a dare.

See I can do that shit too.

Henrik
Guest

Obviously haven't had much experience with the Lost score, but Michael GIacchino is one of the worst composers working on major hollywood movies in my opinion. I can recall no melody of his, and his The Incredibles score is just part of that tone that irks me to no end, where it's almost telegraphing to an audience, "yes we're having fun, isn't it fun to have fun with us? Just don't tell the kids, they think it's real". His Star Trek score was fucking shit, unfortunately.

Lets just fix this as well:

"This true story is recalled childishly, inanely and overall pisspoorly in the 2006 Walt Disney Pictures film, Cars."

Henrik
Guest

And it's kind of nice seeing Kurt echoing some of the complaints I have always had with Lost. He just has this way of doing it without being called an arrogant anti-american son of a bitch. Although this: "Guy is swindled out of Kidney by fake father!" is even further than I thought Lost went. I can't believe so many intelligent people were able to stick with this bullshit, I guess people really do need their mysteries. It's almost like these people would fall for magic tricks as well, basically what it boils down to is somebody you don't know tells you "I know something you don't", and you're sitting there with your mouth open waiting for him to reveal it, and if it turns out he actually didn't know it, you'll defend him by saying at least he made it interesting!

rot
Guest

It never occurred to me that Lost is like Twilight Zone, not just the title card, the whole thing, but that is exactly right. And like Twilight Zone you have your anecdotes that get played upon, and much of the back stories of the characters are in the realm of the anecdotal, for better or worse. If you require unfiltered human pathos than this is definitely not going to be your thing… this is in the realm of fantasy, has a pulp aspect to it. I will say this though, and it didn't even occur to me until I heard this conversation, some of what seems overly trite and convenient for the sake of storytelling (i.e. the resistance for some characters to spell out what is going on) is, in the wider narrative, justified. I think Andrew says by the end you have a different perspective of the flashbacks and I would agree (these justifications aren't completely spelled out, you need to do the legwork, but when you think about it, they make sense). What seems highly coincidental is not always a case of lazy writing.

Kurt
Guest

I am looking forward to this, but I hit the episode string with the guy from the BALLOON and he, thus far, has the best line in the show, after being interrogated and beat up by the paranoid folks in the Hatch (Jack, Sayid, Locke, Michelle Rodriguez) they finally let him out for a bowl of cereal after 3-4 days in lockdown. His first line of dialogue "Boy, you guys have some serious Trust Issues" -> Bingo, I'm sure the writers all smiled as they wrote that bon mot!

dan
Guest

Kurt, I wouldn't put so much stake in "season 4 is when the show hits its stride." The first two seasons were the best in my opinion. It goes downhill from there. Season six is the worst, with a horrible series finale. And you're right about the flashbacks being terrible filler. When I rewatched the first couple seasons on dvd, I pretty much fast-forwarded through any and all flashbacks and didn't feel like I missed a thing. They're just a waste of time–flat out boring and not very rewarding if you stick with them. **sentence removed for spoiler**. But you're right about the island action being awesome, for the most part. It kept me watching all the way through to the end.

Kurt
Guest

I'm glad that you guys are digging my 'Lost newbie' perspective of the show. I thought everything that I had to say would have been said to death before, considering the obsessive fanbase and whatnot. Glad to have you guys talking with me through this mega-marathon. Almost done Season 2 at this point.

rot
Guest

that said, Kurt, have you seen an episode of Survivor? Its probably somewhat accurate that a bunch of strangers put together on an island would have trust issues.

dan
Guest

Seriously…consider fast-forwarding through the flashbacks, especially if they have anything to do with jack, kate, sun/jin, kate/bernard, or claire. Garbage. Or do this: watch the first couple of flashback moments of each show. If you think it's going to be lame based on your first impression, it probably is–fast-forward through the rest of the flashbacks for that show. You'll thank me later.

rot
Guest

I rewatched the Season 3 opener last night, there is an ease to it that is rarely attained in the show, the characters get to breathe a bit, the score is not bombastic, its the perfect tonal balance… I say again you are all crazy.

rot
Guest

also the mid-season cliffhanger moment of Season 3 is as fist-pumping as the show gets.

Henrik
Guest

Oh. That's fair. I didn't realize you were being bullied, I thought you were defending Cars. I seem to remember the town in the movie being populated by talking Cars though, which more or less negates any sort of actual historic premise.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Andrew, I think I was trying to tell Matt that but got drowned out during the show, I got where you were coming from on the 'towns go to die when the highway system changed.' Nothing wrong with evoking a real-world situation, but it doesn't make it 'BASED ON HISTORY' which was your choice of words -> Note, this is also a major point in PSYCHO and the BATES MOTEL.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I'm not doubting you, I totally am on board. But so what? That makes the film better? I'm sure the film was not written in a vaccuum, and there are some things put in there, but it doesn't change the rather lame (by pixar standards) story and overall vanilla of that film.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

NO, the STORY EXECUTION not the visual look is Vanilla.

I concur, the film (particularly the opening car race) is drop dead gorgeous.

rot
Guest

why does Avatar?

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

THis is not scientific, I think there are about as many lovers and haters of Cars as their is of Avatar. Just maybe they are not swimming in your circles.

I do believe I read somewhere that Disney made more on the Cars merchandise that the bulk of their other films put together, or something to that effect.

John Allison
Editor

"I do believe I read somewhere that Disney made more on the Cars merchandise that the bulk of their other films put together, or something to that effect."

And does this matter at all when talking about the film?

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

It does when we are talking about "PERCEIVED POPULARITY" of the film. Which was the topic above (re: Cars, Avatar, and people hating on them)

rot
Guest

I have Princess Bride on blu-ray at home but haven't watched it yet. Its possible its a bad transfer, or your friend doesn't have the picture fine-tuned (I actually had to look online for specific specs that far increased the quality of image than what the custom settings gave). For me The Fountain and Neverending Story are the only blu-ray I have that the quality is a bit iffy, but the sensation of sharp image does adjust with whatever film you got. Kurt is right, Lost on blu-ray has to be the crispest visuals I have ever seen, but it has to do with what is onscreen and that it was digital. Also stunningly beautiful on blu-ray is The Untouchables, No Country For Old Men, For All Mankind, Che, Days of Heaven, Minority Report, The New World. For grain, Rio Bravo, Chungking Express, 400 Blows are awesome.

rot
Guest

For All Mankind is BETTER… check out the special features where they discuss retrieving this never before seen footage… they are the sharpest images of space ever put onto a dvd, even on regular hi-def its noticeably sharp.

Antho42
Guest

Finish watching the Saragossa Manuscript… All I have to say is that Matt Gamble is a genius( well, only in this subfield) when finding rare gems.

Matt Gamble
Guest

I wish I could take credit for finding it.

Matt Gamble
Guest

I still need to see Metropolis as well.

Kurt
Guest

Yay! Agora opened in my neck of the woods. Been itching to revisit that one since I loved it at TIFF (but was too darn busy two give it the review it deserved!)

If Agora is playing in your neighborhood, go check it out. AWESOME.

Mike Rot
Member

I can't remember what Matt said about Get Him to The Greek but I just caught it and was amazed at how funny it is. I would even go so far as to say its funnier than Superbad, definitely funnier than The Hangover and Forgetting Sarah Marshall. Rose Byrne is awesome in it, (her video about the ring around her dirty posey is a classic). Its also visually pretty impressive, while fairly long the movie goes at breakneck pace. The set-pieces are brilliant though… the swimming pool scene, the way they play that out, what could be a throwaway gag but because they are injecting a bit of drama into it makes it even funnier.

Mike Rot
Member

here is the extended version of Byrne's music video

<object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/_J3zClnL_Ho?fs=1&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_J3zClnL_Ho?fs=1&hl=en_US&quot; type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object>

and here is the 1st 5 minutes of the film, with Russell Brand's hilarious African Child music video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFHOzarT78Q&p=1F98

David Brook
Admin

Really? I hated that movie, I didn't find it funny at all. I found all the satire too blunt and unimaginative and the songs irritated the hell out of me. The Dirty Posey song worked, but I didn't buy Brand's at all.

I do hate Russell Brand though which didn't help.

Mike Rot
Member

the songs are what they are, the strength of the film is the dialogue, I can't believe you didn't find it funny… practically everything worked for me, what surprised me was how quickly and consistently the comedy was… the only parts that were weak was when they tried to inject drama, the love story, the dad angle, but the whole road movie storyline was so much fun.

I used to listen to Brand on BBC, and he can be hard to listen to for any length of time but in here, he was great… P Diddy steals the show though, him running down the street high on the Jeffrey is funny.

David Brook
Guest

Maybe I was in the wrong mood, but I felt like it fell flat. P Diddy was good and the Jeffrey scene was pretty funny, but Brand and Hill didn't click for me and I just found it all a bit dull.

I did watch it with a notoriously hard to please friend though and I can always tell when he hates a film, which generally sours the viewing experience for me too.

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